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Thread: CRP signup

  1. #1

    Default CRP signup

    I keep hearing about new CRP signup, than I hear that it is probably just lip service and won't result in any more being enrolled(this from farther south). What is happening with the signup in ND? Is it worthwhile to the land owners? Will it result in more or will the loss just continue? Is there anyway to help, such as contacting fish and game?

  2. #2

    Default

    There is a new CRP sign up however the new payments are less than the previous. The best soils get paid more while the worst soils that should be in CRP get paid peanuts. I would expect to see more CRP get taken out as they cannot compete with farmer rental rates.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,303

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brickhouse View Post
    There is a new CRP sign up however the new payments are less than the previous. The best soils get paid more while the worst soils that should be in CRP get paid peanuts. I would expect to see more CRP get taken out as they cannot compete with farmer rental rates.

    The best soils get paid more while the worst soils that should be in CRP get paid peanuts.

    this is the problem, they have it ass backwards.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    NW Iowa
    Posts
    36

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    With commodity prices low, the farmers are still willing to pay rental rates that about insure no profits, they are an optimistic bunch. They just don't want to give-up any ground for when things get good (high grain prices) again. With poor ground that produces little, it shouldn't take a big payment to entice an owner to take that ground out of production and have the government pay the "rent". Highly productive ground should/does demand higher cash rent payments, (farmers can make more, they can pay more), so it will take larger government payments to entice the owners to take that ground out of production. Sure, it makes the most sence to only place the most highly erodible ground in the program (in the interest of saving the soil) and I think there were times when the programs only allowed HEL acres to be placed in the program. Basing the payment rates on soil types allowed almost any ground in production to quailfy. On the current program, I am not sure it is soil type, it may be any ground in production, but the payment is based on a percentage of the county rent average, so now it will likely only be the most unproductive ground being put in. The payment by soil type last time around really took some good productive ground out of production and put great bird habitat where you won't see it enrolling now. I am in Iowa and I am guessing this is how it works everywhere.

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