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Thread: Nw or sw

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Wichita,KS.
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    1,204

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    5 years ago residents outnumbered nonresidents. Last year nrs outnumbered residents by close to 40 percent. And walkin hunting acres shrunk by what 20? That large of a swing didn't come for the pheasants.
    Last edited by BrownDogsCan2; 12-28-2019 at 06:00 PM.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
    Hunter numbers for quail in Kansas have been steadily declining for more than 50 years. Total days afield per hunter as well. There are about half as many quail hunters as there were 20 years ago in Kansas and they average about a bird and half a day. While quail numbers are certainly falling, the data just don’t support the idea that a bunch of out of staters are sweeping through Kansas hunting quail into extinction, or even meaningfully impacting quail populations.
    In 1965 Kansas sold 9,895 non resident licenses. In 2017 Kansas sold 65,166 non resident licenses. However the decline in quail numbers has more to do with habitat loss than hunter numbers. As far as the decline in upland hunters, rack that up to declining quail numbers and loss of access. Simply can't run down the road a 1/2 mile and hunt like you used to, it is now purple paint.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    NE Oklahoma
    Posts
    384

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    Almost everyone we ran into opening weekend was chasing quail. I hunt quail here. Not up there. We do see some quail but not enough to get excited about. Never bother messing with them.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    167

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    In 1965 160,000 people hunted quail in Kansas. Last year 65,000 did. The quail don’t care if they came from Pittsburg or Pittsburgh.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
    In 1965 160,000 people hunted quail in Kansas. Last year 65,000 did. The quail don’t care if they came from Pittsburg or Pittsburgh.
    Which is exactly why I said the decline in quail numbers has more to do with habitat versus hunting pressure. You must have missed that. Since you mentioned Pittsburg, there are hardly any quail in Crawford County these days. They all but disappeared in the early 90's. It was not uncommon to find 15 coveys a day in the 80's in Crawford and Cherokee counties. We also used to have a good flight of prairie chickens. There were so many we just patterned and hunted them like ducks. I have not seen a prairie chicken in those counties for nearly 30 years. Non resident hunting has put a squeeze on residents. Heavy advertising from the KDWPT and the obsession with deer hunting has forced the residents to take up new hobbies. That is the single biggest cause that has led to more non resident hunters than residents. Not blaming non residents, just stating the facts. The blame goes to the KDWPT. The decline in upland hunters started shortly after non resident deer hunting was opened up in 1995. Combine that with declining quail numbers and leased up land, you end up with hunting being turned into a competition of who can throw down the most money. I consider myself lucky that I got to bowhunt deer and hunt quail and chickens when the hunting was unbelievable. We will never see hunting here again like it was in the 70's and 80's. It was spectacular. Big deer, lots of birds, and you could hunt anywhere you wanted to. Just glad I have those memories that most on here will not get to experience.
    Last edited by westksbowhunter; 12-29-2019 at 10:14 AM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    NE Oklahoma
    Posts
    384

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    Grandad hunted Woodson Co in the mid 60s. Said it wasn’t worth the two hour drive from Wichita unless they had a couple of guys and several kids. One guy would be done in 20 minutes or so. Figured it was 20 to 30 coveys a day easily. Said they’d usually be in another covey before the singles. Would have been something.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by akp View Post
    Grandad hunted Woodson Co in the mid 60s. Said it wasn’t worth the two hour drive from Wichita unless they had a couple of guys and several kids. One guy would be done in 20 minutes or so. Figured it was 20 to 30 coveys a day easily. Said they’d usually be in another covey before the singles. Would have been something.
    Yep that is how it was. You just pushed one covey into another. You would see a covey or 2 driving from one spot to another.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    NE Oklahoma
    Posts
    384

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    Yea his story was he got permission from a guy at Boeing he worked with to hunt a family farm near Yates Center. Drove out there the first time. Spotted a covey in the ditch. Got out and flushed them and let the dogs out. Never returned to the car until they were done. Covey after covey after covey... I think the closet I’ll ever experience to that was the Oklahoma panhandle in 2015-16.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by akp View Post
    Yea his story was he got permission from a guy at Boeing he worked with to hunt a family farm near Yates Center. Drove out there the first time. Spotted a covey in the ditch. Got out and flushed them and let the dogs out. Never returned to the car until they were done. Covey after covey after covey... I think the closet I’ll ever experience to that was the Oklahoma panhandle in 2015-16.
    You know back then you hardly ever saw another hunter or group. Seems like now hunters are every where. Might have been more licenses sold back then but hunting pressure seems to be 10 times more today, with less places to go. Hunting pressure is becoming unbearable.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    NE Oklahoma
    Posts
    384

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    The bobwhite habitat keeps moving west so it’s concentrating hunters in a very well defined area from about I35 to 150 miles west of there.... from northern Kansas down through Oklahoma. Running out of good native habitat. What I saw in the Oklahoma panhandle in 15-16 would hard pressed to be beat by any period ever. Thing is the good stuff habitat wise has shrunk to a relatively small area. The good, uninterrupted stuff...

    Also, the conversion of so much to Bermuda and fescue cannot be ignored. All of the places I had here in eastern Oklahoma when I was a kid are pretty much void of birds. They’re gone and not coming back. That’s just the simple fact of it. Eastern Oklahoma and Eastern Kansas are done for most part. There’ll be little upswings but what many consider good hunting will never happen again in those areas. Like west said.. It’s a habitat thing. I’d also guess that the 50s to the say early 80s was an anomaly. The birds really responded to the farming practices of that era and their high numbers were not natural. Just my opinion of course.
    Last edited by akp; 12-30-2019 at 08:33 AM.

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