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Thread: Know how to ask.

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    IaKota
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    1,046

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    I'm also just back from two weekends in SD, where I was trying to help with harvest that isnt going so well as the crops are just not drying. So instead, we did maintenance on equipment, moved equipment around, spread 7 loads of gravel, installed 60 feet of radiant heat in a new shop, etc. I did have a 5 day license to hunt. I hunted Thursday afternoon before anyone else showed up to work. and a couple hours Sunday morning, before I decided to go fishing instead since the weather was so nice. It truly sucked to be that nice out and not be able to turn a wheel in regards to taking the crop out with no drying capabilities..Now, this is a established relationship, but one that I nurture to the best of my ability.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by reddog View Post
    Back in my glory days, I would ask to hunt anywhere and everywhere if I wanted to hunt it. I got turned down some, but I got let go more times than not. Alot of those cold calls,(ill never call or text to ask permission unless the relationship is already secure) turned into life long friendships, or which at this point in time, I have outlived most of those contacts. Plus, almost every piece of ground I earned permission on, is now DNR or federal land. The older I get, the less likely I am to ask, so there fore, I do less hunting and more fishing.. Two experiences stand out, actually 3. One has to do with pheasants.. I asked permission for a couple years in a row and got turned down, then I asked if I could hunt coyotes and that got my foot in the door... for good. But, if I went there when he wasnt busy, I had to take him hunting with me. Another situation centered around asking to hunt a fox on a piece of land back in the early 80s . Knocked on guys at 10:30 am on a saturday. Told him there was a fox out in his section and asked if he minded if I went out to try to get it. His face turned a Heinz Ketchup red, and he started poking me in the chest, saying no, absolutely not, and if you do go I'm going to call the sheriff. I proceeded to tell him that a simple no was sufficient, and Id be on my way. One other "situation" revolved around asking for another fox. About 830 on a saturday, I was met by the lady of the house at the front door, fresh out of the shower, if you get my drift.. She did have a gown on, but it left little to the imagination.. I drive by there occasionally and
    I understand why some farmers are irritated by pheasant hunters asking permission, but not all hunters are pay hunters.You have to knock on doors.Calling is impersonal when you don't know the people.All you can do, is ask, and if you are alone, you have a chance.Leave a 6 pack of pbr, or a steak.That will suffice.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Lawrence, Kansas
    Posts
    4,127

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    Last season I called a someone who owns a piece of land and manages another piece of land, both with good cover grass, both of which abut a crop field I hunt. I left a message with some details, what we (three of us) wanted to hunt, and to what extent, and waited for a reply. He never called back. But he sent a message. The next day we found fresh stripes of purple paint on what we sought permission to hunt on. Very clear response. Oh well.
    Last edited by BritChaser; 11-21-2019 at 11:30 AM.
    - From the office of Colt, Stoeger, Browning & Savage
    - Kansas: Big Cock Country

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by BritChaser View Post
    Last season I called a someone who owns a piece of land and manages another piece of land, both with good cover grass, both of which abut a crop field I hunt. I left a message with some details, what we (three of us) wanted to hunt, and to what extent, and waited for a reply. He never called back. But he sent a message. The next day we found fresh stripes of purple paint on what we sought permission to hunt on. Very clear response. Oh well.
    I've found a few good places, by getting permission on their neighbors land, or in the general vicinity.I get the angry farmer senerio. Sometimes they are not very nice, for whatever reason. It takes years, to get good at getting permission. I used to hunt with this country bumkin type dude, and he was good at getting permission. Sometimes he would talk too much, and screw it up.But yeah, if it's good, I'll leave a few beers, if I have any.They usually don't want birds, so offer a steak.They don't want help on the farm usually. I got a guys truck running one time.That dude has great land!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
    Location
    NW Iowa
    Posts
    17

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    Here in Iowa, where I live and grew up, I have known many of the farmers/landowners all my life, makes it easy getting pheasant ground. When I go out to find prairie dawgs in NW SD, stopping at ranches, you find some of the finest folks you can imagine. It likely helps that I grew-up on a farm and enjoy talking farming/ranching with the folks. After finding a good dawg town (or pheasant filled waterway) I will offer to take the owners out for supper, they usually decline, so they get a gift certificate they can use at the local restrauant/watering hole on their schedule along with a message that we would like to return next year. Have made some great relationships over the years. If the rancher likes you, he will get you in with other ranchers. Be nice and friendly and if you get permission, leave the gates as you found them, don't leave trash behind, let the the owner know how you did and thank them again. Seems very obvious, I guessing this is pretty much what everyone basicaly does that has any success.

    Remember that often the farms with great bird habitat, has that because they and their family are avid hunters, and they worked hard to create it, so don't take the it personal if they don't give permission.

    One post here reminded me of a sign on a ranch in SD, it read "If you have never worked on this ranch, don't ever bother asking to hunt here." If you have seen this guy's sign, you were off the hard surface a few miles.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by remy3424 View Post
    Here in Iowa, where I live and grew up, I have known many of the farmers/landowners all my life, makes it easy getting pheasant ground. When I go out to find prairie dawgs in NW SD, stopping at ranches, you find some of the finest folks you can imagine. It likely helps that I grew-up on a farm and enjoy talking farming/ranching with the folks. After finding a good dawg town (or pheasant filled waterway) I will offer to take the owners out for supper, they usually decline, so they get a gift certificate they can use at the local restrauant/watering hole on their schedule along with a message that we would like to return next year. Have made some great relationships over the years. If the rancher likes you, he will get you in with other ranchers. Be nice and friendly and if you get permission, leave the gates as you found them, don't leave trash behind, let the the owner know how you did and thank them again. Seems very obvious, I guessing this is pretty much what everyone basicaly does that has any success.

    Remember that often the farms with great bird habitat, has that because they and their family are avid hunters, and they worked hard to create it, so don't take the it personal if they don't give permission.

    One post here reminded me of a sign on a ranch in SD, it read "If you have never worked on this ranch, don't ever bother asking to hunt here." If you have seen this guy's sign, you were off the hard surface a few miles.
    Some people can't afford a gift certificate, but that's a nice gesture. I use a camper when I hunt, saves in gas, and chow
    I don't know anything about ranching. You sir, are very lucky to have connections

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    252

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goosemaster View Post
    Some people can't afford a gift certificate, but that's a nice gesture. I use a camper when I hunt, saves in gas, and chow
    I don't know anything about ranching. You sir, are very lucky to have connections
    Anybody can afford a $50 gift certificate to the local restaurant.... Skip your $1 coffee each day for the next 50 days. Don't eat out for the next 6 months, plan ahead and pack your own meals for your hunting trips, lunch at work, etc. There's literally 10 million ways that somebody could save money to purchase a gift certificate to gain bird hunting access. Heck, maybe that hunting access you gained saves you $50 in gas money for your next trip because you don't have to travel as far.

    Reminds me of a coworker who once asked me for $30 to purchase a Christmas Tree for her so when her grandkids come over for Christmas they won't be disappointed. The same coworker also showed up to work everyday with gas station coffee and donuts for herself, and went to the gas station for lunch. That's at least $10 a day right there. You can buy a dozen eggs at Kwik Trip for $0.49, Bananas for $0.29/pound, and make your own coffee at home. A few eggs, a banana, your own brewed coffee would cost you $.04 per egg, $0.10 banana, and maybe $.50 per coffee. Your own (healthier) breakfast each day for less than a buck... Plan ahead and make your own lunches will save you another several bucks. All adds up in the long run. If you can save $10 a day on food every day for 365 days = $3,650 in savings per year. That's $36,500 in 10 years. Now invest it, add in compounding interest, and you have your own hunting cabin or piece of land when you retire. Now found dozens of other areas in your life where you can cut back spending the same way.
    Last edited by jackrabbit; 11-22-2019 at 09:28 AM.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackrabbit View Post
    Anybody can afford a $50 gift certificate to the local restaurant.... Skip your $1 coffee each day for the next 50 days. Don't eat out for the next 6 months, plan ahead and pack your own meals for your hunting trips, lunch at work, etc. There's literally 10 million ways that somebody could save money to purchase a gift certificate to gain bird hunting access. Heck, maybe that hunting access you gained saves you $50 in gas money for your next trip because you don't have to travel as far.

    Reminds me of a coworker who once asked me for $30 to purchase a Christmas Tree for her so when her grandkids come over for Christmas they won't be disappointed. The same coworker also showed up to work everyday with gas station coffee and donuts for herself, and went to the gas station for lunch. That's at least $10 a day right there. You can buy a dozen eggs at Kwik Trip for $0.49, Bananas for $0.29/pound, and make your own coffee at home. A few eggs, a banana, your own brewed coffee would cost you $.04 per egg, $0.10 banana, and maybe $.50 per coffee. Your own (healthier) breakfast each day for less than a buck... Plan ahead and make your own lunches will save you another several bucks. All adds up in the long run. If you can save $10 a day on food every day for 365 days = $3,650 in savings per year. That's $36,500 in 10 years. Now invest it, add in compounding interest, and you have your own hunting cabin or piece of land when you retire. Now found dozens of other areas in your life where you can cut back spending the same way.
    That's actually a good idea.I found a ranch near Roy, Montana that is great pheasant hunting! The owner, is a drinker, so I bought him a bottle of Johnny Walker Red about a month ago. He really appreciated that gift, so every time I go there, I leave some kind of gratuity. These ranchers in Montana, don't Bird hunt.They don't have interest in birds.They are feeding cattle, doing ranch chores, all kinds of stuff . When they see you pull in, I'm sure they are thinking, " great, another hunter ". They get irritated , and they just say no, no matter who you are, or how you approach them.I found a place near Sidney, Montana this fall, that was excellent hunting.I just knocked on every single door I drove by.It took most of the day, I was alone, in my 72 F100 4x4. Now I knew, eventually, that one of these guys would let me hunt.Now these fancy farms, owned by these bushwa types from back East? Don't even ask.No way are they letting a knock on door, guy on.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goosemaster View Post
    Some people can't afford a gift certificate, but that's a nice gesture. I use a camper when I hunt, saves in gas, and chow
    I don't know anything about ranching. You sir, are very lucky to have connections
    Oh!!! Good Lord—You can afford to travel and hunt—but not afford a decent thank you —for those that make it possible!!

    Seems you were the person trying to get people to go to Canada with you—one prerequisite was no “tight wads” —ever occur to you that maybe people like you p@#$ land owners off—and may even lead to making them more liable to lease there land out to reasonable person or group?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,283

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    Quote Originally Posted by david0311 View Post
    Oh!!! Good Lord—You can afford to travel and hunt—but not afford a decent thank you —for those that make it possible!!

    Seems you were the person trying to get people to go to Canada with you—one prerequisite was no “tight wads” —ever occur to you that maybe people like you p@#$ land owners off—and may even lead to making them more liable to lease there land out to reasonable person or group?

    really! don't be a tight ass and expect something for nothing........show your appreciation!

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