Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 55

Thread: Know how to ask.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    387

    Default Know how to ask.

    Some folks just get themselves crossways right off the start. This is a dialog from a phone call this morning, 7:30.

    Phone rings

    McFarmer : hello.

    Hunter: do you own land on the west side of the lake ?

    McFarmer: whoís calling ?

    Hunter: *states name*

    McFarmer: yes we do.

    Hunter: can I hunt there ?

    McFarmer: hunt what ?

    Hunter: geese.

    McFarmer: all this land is in a Canada goose refuge.

    Hunter: my buddies hunt geese all around the lake.

    McFarmer: well, I donít know about your buddies but this side of the lake is a refuge.

    Hunter: no, the only waterfowl protection area is south of the lake.

    McFarmer: I didnít say a protection area, I said refuge.

    Hunter: itís the same thing.

    McFarmer: whatever, I guess the answer is no.

    Hunter: oh. *hangs up*

    Letís hear some other landowner stories about how not to ask for permission, or how not to treat the privilege. Iíve had the pleasure of hosting many hunters, deer, duck, pheasant or whatever. Many bird watchers also. People who enjoy the outdoors are some of the nicest folks around. But, itís human nature to remember the bad apples longer than the others. Probably an evolutionary thing.

  2. #2

    Default

    Not surprised—

    Due to my job —had to have public phone access at home—
    Unreal how stupid/rude/ignorant some people are—
    Can’t count the number of times people would call for a point of law—and then they would argue with you —(as in above example)—.
    These calls were especially appreciated at 1:00 AM with the drunk calling and the juke box playing in the back round—
    SOLUTION TO ABOVE—TELL THEM YOU DONT KNOW THE ANSWER—GET HOME PHONE NUMBER-CALL ABOUT 4 30AM WITH ANSWER

    However my immediate turn off was—answering the phone—and person calling -opening with—WHO IS THIS-INSTANTANEOUS P#3%& off-
    ;

  3. #3

    Default

    I handle permission for our land here in Ohio and it is a never ending situation of weird texts and phone calls it seems. Known unethical groups always pushing the boundary and having a different person from their group ask for permission with the plan to then come through and drive everything off our ground. Early on the trick was to always say they had hit one and it ran on our property and could they go recover it. They know my answer is going to be just wait right there and I’ll be up shortly and will to track it with the shooter. Otherwise their recovery just becomes a deer drive. We have a farm that butts up to a wildlife refuge that is awesome waterfowl hunting so I get lots of calls asking for permission there but have a guy that has hunted it for the last 10 years so easy out on that.

    Best thing we have done is get to know the game wardens really well. As a matter fact Sunday night game Worden stopped at my house as there was a truck parked on the property line down the road and he wanted to make sure was someone with permission since he knows no one else should be in there. It was the neighbors boy hunting their property so was all good. Having good neighbors is always key also and thankfully we do for the most part.

    McFarmer - sorry you had to deal with an inconsiderate and uninformed hunter.

  4. #4

    Default

    Flip side is true also. I have run into some rather ornery and down right strange farmers out there. Banjo plays in the background. There were farms that my brother refused to visit or even call during hunting season because the guy was so darn angry or odd. But I get it. Farming can be a very difficult lifestyle often with high stress, loneliness, debt, divorce, family in-fighting (often your business partners) and alcoholism to name a few.

    Hunters also rarely know what prior experiences the landowner has had (recent or long ago) with other hunters. Politeness can be a two-way street.
    Last edited by BRITTMAN; 11-19-2019 at 04:44 PM.

  5. #5

    Default

    My brother was a well known and very well respected state employee Ag Specialist. Much like a farmer in prime hunting country ... his phone rang all the time ... most often in the evening and late evening when it was family time with farmers asking for advise. He nearly always answered the phone and was polite and helpful.

    Eventually he took his expertise private with his clients receiving the attention they needed to succeed.
    Last edited by BRITTMAN; 11-19-2019 at 04:43 PM.

  6. #6

    Default

    Best time to ask is summer time, show up with a friendly hand shake and a pair of work gloves and boots. Fall is extremely busy and stressful time for farmers and ranchers, especially this fall in many areas, combing is late, winter is early. I am guessing most farmers and ranchers with good cover are inundated with request this time of year. best remember that.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    387

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Montana Husker View Post
    Best time to ask is summer time, show up with a friendly hand shake and a pair of work gloves and boots. Fall is extremely busy and stressful time for farmers and ranchers, especially this fall in many areas, combing is late, winter is early. I am guessing most farmers and ranchers with good cover are inundated with request this time of year. best remember that.
    Folks on here talk about helping out the farmer, good deal if it works for them I guess. Myself I can’t think of a job I would trust someone off the street to help with, much less do. Picking up rocks is the only thing that comes to mind.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BRITTMAN View Post
    Flip side is true also. I have run into some rather ornery and down right strange farmers out there. Banjo plays in the background. There were farms that my brother refused to visit or even call during hunting season because the guy was so darn angry or odd. But I get it. Farming can be a very difficult lifestyle often with high stress, loneliness, debt, divorce, family in-fighting (often your business partners) and alcoholism to name a few.

    Hunters also rarely know what prior experiences the landowner has had (recent or long ago) with other hunters. Politeness can be a two-way street.
    I agree, some farmers are not friendly. All it takes, is one hunter pissing them off, and they will remember it, rest assured. I can almost look at a farm, and have an idea of weather U can get on. The nice farms, usually say no.Big farms, will have outfitters, or charge money.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    387

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Goosemaster View Post
    I can almost look at a farm, and have an idea of weather U can get on. The nice farms, usually say no.
    Wow, that’s all I can say. Wow.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by McFarmer View Post
    Folks on here talk about helping out the farmer, good deal if it works for them I guess. Myself I can’t think of a job I would trust someone off the street to help with, much less do. Picking up rocks is the only thing that comes to mind.
    That is sad, here in Montana, I know quite a few folks who help a rancher or farmer, hell, I have helped wire shops, look at electrical problems on my own time....I know lots of locals who show up to help brand and combine....guess that is why we say: Montana, the last best place!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •