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Thread: Help with wild bird shooting

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Indiana
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    52

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    I don't consider myself a particularly good shot. I'm kinda streaky. I'll miss several and then get hot and connect several times in a row. What I think causes me to miss is either not mounting consistently or more likely I put the end of the barrel/bead right UNDERNEATH the birds head/beak. I feel I shoot right under them. It's especially true when I get a straight away flush and see a foot dangling. I know I'm supposed to "Cover it up" but often times don't do it. When I swing thru and make sure that when i swing I'M SWINGING THRU THE BIRD and to it's head? DEAD BIRD.

  2. #12

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    Close your left eye, get a fiber optic bead sight, and go to a longer barrel.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goosemaster View Post
    Close your left eye, get a fiber optic bead sight, and go to a longer barrel.
    I'm shooting with the dominant eye over the rib (left eye) the barrel is 28" long and the M2 does have a very small fiber optic bead. I did buy a larger fiber optic but don't use it because you're not supposed to look at the barrel.

  4. #14

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    If right handed, close your left eye, and get your right eye, looking strait down the barel.Make sure the gun is level, and not canted.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    844

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    If you're shooting 5,000 rounds a year (assuming you're relatively successful), but you just haven't hit a wild pheasant yet (notice I didn't say "can't"), don't all of a sudden go changing the way you shoot. And your barrel is fine. My guess is it's mostly a matter of relaxing. Take a breath. Feet set correctly. Eyes (plural) on the target. Etc. Don't over think it. Your gun & shells aren't the issue. All you gotta do is relax & shoot the way you shoot. I think if you're in a hurry, you tend to not follow through & you also tend to lift your head off the stock to see that puff of pheathers (see what I did there?).

    Another possibility....if you're wearing considerably more clothing while hunting than you do on the clays course, practice mounting the gun in your hunting clothes. Make sure all's good.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by HS Strut View Post
    I don't consider myself a particularly good shot. I'm kinda streaky. I'll miss several and then get hot and connect several times in a row. What I think causes me to miss is either not mounting consistently or more likely I put the end of the barrel/bead right UNDERNEATH the birds head/beak. I feel I shoot right under them. It's especially true when I get a straight away flush and see a foot dangling. I know I'm supposed to "Cover it up" but often times don't do it. When I swing thru and make sure that when i swing I'M SWINGING THRU THE BIRD and to it's head? DEAD BIRD.
    Mike, you have to be able to see the bird, unless it's a dead overhead, oncoming shot, or straight-away climbing bird (hat-tip goldenboy). My guess is that when your brain thinks the tip of your barrel is low, what's really happening is you're lifting your head (seeing more barrel & making it appear low) & actually shooting high. My experience has been (with birds dangling legs that have crash landed further on, or been knocked down w/ 2nd shot) is that a dangling leg doesn't necessarily mean their leg has been hit. I've cleaned lots of these birds that had absolutely nothing wrong w/ their legs. I think they just drop a leg sometimes if they've had a bb whistle through them somewhere. Also, when they're flying, the legs are tucked up & basically almost in line with vitals & stuff (as far as a shotgun is concerned). Straight-aways are just plain difficult if they're over 30-35 yards. Easy enough to hit; tough to kill. Pellets have to penetrate through a lot of crap (literally) to get to the boiler room & their heads/necks are well shielded.
    Last edited by A5 Sweet 16; 10-25-2019 at 09:44 AM.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  7. #17

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    You need to concentrate on the red on their eyes, or the white ring on neck. Try not to concentrate on tail feathers, lots of folks fail to follow thru completely, the tail feathers make up over half the length of the bird, I just focus on their head, this helps me greatly.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Montana Husker View Post
    You need to concentrate on the red on their eyes, or the white ring on neck. Try not to concentrate on tail feathers, lots of folks fail to follow thru completely, the tail feathers make up over half the length of the bird, I just focus on their head, this helps me greatly.
    You cant focus on the head of a bird.

  9. #19

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    D.A. you can't focus period.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    52

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    [QUOTE=A5 Sweet 16;253059]Mike, you have to be able to see the bird, unless it's a dead overhead, oncoming shot. My guess is that when your brain thinks the tip of your barrel is low, what's really happening is you're lifting your head (seeing more barrel & making it appear low) & actually shooting high. My experience has been (with birds dangling legs that have crash landed further on, or been knocked down w/ 2nd shot) is that a dangling leg doesn't necessarily mean their leg has been hit. I've cleaned lots of these birds that had absolutely nothing wrong w/ their legs. I think they just drop a leg sometimes if they've had a bb whistle through them somewhere. Also, when they're flying, the legs are tucked up & basically almost in line with vitals & stuff (as far as a shotgun is concerned). Straight-aways are just plain difficult if they're over 30-35 yards. Easy enough to hit; tough to kill. Pellets have to penetrate through a lot of crap (literally) to get to the boiler room & their heads/necks are well shielded.

    Brent, I would buy what your saying about about lifting my head....thanks for the advice....Your so right about those straight-aways....I've POUNDED birds flying straight away thinking "That's a dead bird" and my dog ends up on an 80 yard retrieve.

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