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Thread: Help with wild bird shooting

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Montana Husker View Post
    D.A. you can't focus period.
    You cant focus on the head of a bird 50 yards away.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Fremont, MI
    Posts
    33

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    LOTS of good tips and advice. Here is a youtube video that also talks about the proper way to mount your shotgun. Of course, as a clay shooter, this should be second nature to you (assuming the gun fits the same as your clay gun).

    Slightly different topic but in response to your third bird. The one that "cackled" but you never saw color...Don't just shoot because of the cackle. The wing beat of a hen can startle us to where we hear the rooster cackle. Be sure of the color before you shoot or you may join the ranks of the accidental hen-killer...

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    846

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    Quote Originally Posted by dekuiper View Post
    The one that "cackled" but you never saw color...Don't just shoot because of the cackle. The wing beat of a hen can startle us to where we hear the rooster cackle. Be sure of the color before you shoot or you may join the ranks of the accidental hen-killer...
    I get the concept, because wing beats can get pretty raucous sometimes.
    But...experienced pheasant hunters...shoot, even if the only identifying thing you have to go on is the cackle.
    I usually almost always never say never, but a cackle is nowhere near the same as wing beats & will NEVER come from the beak of a hen.
    In my 50 years of life, I've NEVER confused wing beats with a cackle. I doubt I'm unique.
    That said, if you can't see color & don't hear a cackle....could be either. Not all roosters cackle, especially later in the season.
    There've been a few times when all I could see was a profile & I knew beyond a shadow of a doubt it was a rooster.
    But I've seen a lot of pheasants in my life & those times are few & far between.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  4. #34

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    I've accidentally shot hens before.Everybody has.Montana had a hen per 3, up untill the 1990's.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    846

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goosemaster View Post
    I've accidentally shot hens before.Everybody has.Montana had a hen per 3, up untill the 1990's.
    Not everybody.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    Free State of North Dakota
    Posts
    45

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    Probably more birds are missed by raising one's head off the stock to see the fall than any other reason. Breaking the stock weld even slightly, virtually assures the shot will go high. Just some food for thought.

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Labs View Post
    Probably more birds are missed by raising one's head off the stock to see the fall than any other reason. Breaking the stock weld even slightly, virtually assures the shot will go high. Just some food for thought.
    That is a great point, thank you for that.Also, tensing up, and pulling hard on the trigger. Also, being in the wrong position.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    28

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    PeteRevv's advice was solid. I don't know what kind of ammo you're using but one thing I've found that greatly improves my success is the velocity of the shot. High speed ammo gets there quicker and reduces the amount of lead. I prefer Federal in Wing Shok or Prairie Storm because its 1500 fps (that's movin' for a shotgun shell). Also, if you are able to, always carry your gun in the "ready" position with 2 hands. Losing a second or two because you only had one hand on your gun is valuable time for a bird to get out of dodge. The simple act of being ready for the bird to flush really helps.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    34

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    Quote Originally Posted by A5 Sweet 16 View Post
    Not everybody.
    If you’ve hunted a lot chances are pretty high you’ve shot a hen by accident.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    846

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbode View Post
    If you’ve hunted a lot chances are pretty high you’ve shot a hen by accident.
    Yeah, I don't call shooting a hen because you were only 99.7% certain it was a rooster an accident. That's guessing & hoping for the best. About the only way to accidentally shoot a hen is to have one move into the path of your shot just as you pull the trigger on a rooster. It happens but is very rare.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

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