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Thread: Letís hear about opening day

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by jackrabbit View Post
    And I just want to clarify, I'm not saying avoid the local restaurants. Just that a budget trip can be done if you really want to. It is also very enjoyable to get breakfast and coffee with the locals in a small town cafe and enjoy the evening steakhouse and watering hole. Great connections and lifetime friends or potential hunting land can be had!
    I disagree.The farmer in the bar, is not going to invite people out.That being said, this is an informative post.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wichita
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    403

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goosemaster View Post
    I disagree.The farmer in the bar, is not going to invite people out.That being said, this is an informative post.
    I've gained hunting permission a time or two in a bar. In fact, did it last year the night before the Kansas Opener.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    MN
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    252

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    Quote Originally Posted by Goosemaster View Post
    I disagree.The farmer in the bar, is not going to invite people out.That being said, this is an informative post.
    I, and several different hunting friends have all gained access from talking with locals while at a cafe, restaurant, or bar. Is a landowner going to come up to a group of 10 in the first 2 weeks of the season and offer them land for free? No.

    But if you are by yourself or with one other person, act polite, and engage in small talk, often times later in the season, then yes it is very possible. You can build relationships that may not lend to hunting on that trip, but down the road it will. I have gained pheasant access by having a conversation about prairie dogs, because I was more so just curious in them and not interested in hunting them. Which led to, "come out to my place whenever and help us get rid of them." Which led to us being respectful of their land, which in turn led to access to their pheasant land in a few years.

    I've never straight up asked someone if they have land. It is usually the local that asks how my trip is going, and then you are polite, which leads to them being polite, and sometimes offering a tiny bit of land they have to you. Whether it is a small slough, shelter belt, 2 acre patch of wetland they couldn't plant on, etc. I even tell them things like, if you'd like, "I will pass on the first Rooster I see. Or I will only take 1, and be on my way." And while I am dead serious in saying that to them, they usually take that as you being respectful and then the landowner is even nicer..

    All these tactics work MUCH better late season and for solo hunters though.

  4. #34

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    a guy I know has gotten on land by saying it this way--"do you have any land that is so rough you wouldn't put a goat in there?" they of course know he is a pheasant hunter, and asking permission that way...

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Rolla Mo
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    267

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    Quote Originally Posted by jags View Post
    Family group of 8 hunted opening weekend and shot 15 birds, all private land around Eureka. Limits from opening weekend till the close of the season are typically easy. I did not even bother to cash in the remaining 5 days of my non-resident license, I instead chose to chase ducks around the countryside and did very well. Good news is the hunters still came in droves with lots of out of state plates in the area. The fireman's feed fed over 700 people on opening day evening, with hunting reports being very dismal. I did see more birds the week prior to opener while chasing ducks and deer, but from past experience the bird numbers are still very low.....lower than I have ever seen them in 23 years. Last Thursday the farmers were going full tilt on the beans but the rain on Sunday and Monday shut them down. Fields and fields and fields of corn are where the pheasants are hiding right now.
    Firemens feed was always a blast. That place downtown still sell Kuchen and the best Rhubarb pie ever? Birds will be back, might take a few years. Good diverse habitat in the area.

  6. #36

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    One time in a bar, in the soux res. A drunk ice fishŤrman from evergreen, told us about a place on the milk, that has been great for 20 years!! There was only 2 of us then, and i usually hunt solo, but this was one of the few times we got on a really good place, through a bar. What i do, is knock on doors, during the season.I drive an old ford f100, or an 83 bronco, both original.I usually wear a sweatshirt, and i don't look like a hunter.I get on some good land, when i'm hunting solo.I don't approach guys in the bar, but i know they all have ground.You have to have a knack, for getting permission.It's an art...

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    844

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    Back when it was relatively easy to just knock on doors & get permission (mostly because it was easier to determine who the heck owned the land), we'd typically break the ice with, "Well, you probably guessed I'm not here selling Avon." And we'd always wear an orange hat to the door. Worked fairly well, especially late in the season. If the land owner didn't seem overly busy, we'd stop back after hunting to thank them again & offer to bring a cleaned bird or 2 out the next time we were in the area (likely the next weekend). People who let me hunt regularly became actual friends. They got special treatment, although I'm quite certain none of them expected it. Early season was a different story. Most land owners were either "saving it until after deer season" or "saving it for my son-in-law who hunts". My days of getting permission to hunt were before I had a family & had plenty of spare time (and it takes beaucoup time). I no longer have that time, nor the desire to put up with the frustration. These days, I only have to drive 40-80 minutes to be in the vicinity of several good public/walk-in areas for the day, & I'm successful enough that public land is good enough for me (as long as it's available). Haven't paid to hunt yet & hope I never have to. (taxes & donations to conservation organizations notwithstanding)
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  8. #38

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    I never wear orange, unless I have to.What I do, is play the poor rube, and it works.Tennis shoes, jeans, sweatshirt, twins hat, and a 6 pack of pbr. I never pay to hunt, although my dad did 3 times in south dak. These places thar charge 400 dollars a day, are a rip off.I can hunt every day for a month, on 400 dollars!!

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Goosemaster View Post
    I never wear orange, unless I have to.What I do, is play the poor rube, and it works.Tennis shoes, jeans, sweatshirt, twins hat, and a 6 pack of pbr. I never pay to hunt, although my dad did 3 times in south dak. These places thar charge 400 dollars a day, are a rip off.I can hunt every day for a month, on 400 dollars!!
    I lived in a college town & I think nearby landowners got a lot of kids (looking like poor rubes) who violated "safe zone" & trespassing rules regularly (although sometimes the guys who do that look like they're straight out of an Orvis catalog). But I'm pretty sure that the "responsible sportsman" look worked better than "poor rube" would have in my case.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin/South Dakota
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    222

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    Just returned from a long weekend in SD. Finished off some house work prepping for Late Nov trip. But did manage to get out and hunt and see how it would size up for the next trip. First of all just like I seen in July when I was out minimal crops and lots of open fields everywhere. I have some areas that I have hunted for years that have absolutely no crops. I figure my next trip out will consist of hunting the few honey holes that are left and branching out to find some new ground again. Which honestly will be a good thing.... Second is the amount of water I don't know if I have seen this much standing water in all my years hunting in SD. I know one thing if I was a duck hunter still I could have a field day with the amount of ducks we seen this past weekend.

    Regarding the pheasant hunting, it was tough going- weather, wind and low numbers. I am happy I have good dogs because it made all the difference in the world. We were able to find a few roosters to take home but once again we worked for every bird we shot. The cover is absolutely unreal this year with some of it being 5' to 6' tall. You actually can completely loose sight of the dogs in front of you due to the cover.

    Overall the hunting was ok. I haven't hunted this early in the year for probably 10 years. I would say though the bird numbers are low compared to past years. I know the crops are coming out now so hopefully once the corn is down we see some better numbers. I know my next trip will a ton of miles on the boots due to conditions to get the dogs into birds. But as always the dogs and I are up to the challenge.....

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