Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Prairie chickens

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mineral Point,WI
    Posts
    180

    Default Prairie chickens

    Top on my bucket list is bagging a prairie chicken. Father time's creeping up on me, I'm 80. Am hoping for some suggestions. Have a Lab & Britt. Even consider a well recommended guide. Thanks for any imput / suggestions. Thanks George.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,243

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasty-G View Post
    Top on my bucket list is bagging a prairie chicken. Father time's creeping up on me, I'm 80. Am hoping for some suggestions. Have a Lab & Britt. Even consider a well recommended guide. Thanks for any imput / suggestions. Thanks George.
    best way is to scout and see the daily flight pattern they are using.....field to roost or loafing area to grain field. then set up at that general time of day and pass shoot them like geese.
    walking them up is tough.....finding them is even tougher.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    127

    Default

    There used to be a guy out of Tipton, KS who guided on them. Patterned their movements as described above, and pass shot them from coffin blinds. I hunt them by walking them up, and yes, it’s a low success rate venture. They usually flush wild.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Western Washington
    Posts
    24

    Default

    Check out the Fort Pierre National Grasslands, Iíve heard of people having success out there with Prairie Chickens

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    IaKota
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by s.davis View Post
    There used to be a guy out of Tipton, KS who guided on them. Patterned their movements as described above, and pass shot them from coffin blinds. I hunt them by walking them up, and yes, it’s a low success rate venture. They usually flush wild.
    .

    Agreed. I don't hunt them much, but have had some success. Seems to me that most seasoned pheasant pointers do not do well with chickens as they seem to pressure them too hard. What I've seen on the Grasslands by watching guys that do have great chicken dogs is that they want a big running dog who points and stays staunch at absolute first scent. Then the hunters walk up in front of the dog , upwards of 50 to 75 yards upwind. If they can't find anything, they release the dog to relocate. Rinse and repeat. My dogs do not do well with them..

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    20 miles south of Ft. Worth, Tx
    Posts
    370

    Default

    I've killed a few somewhat north of Tipton, KS.

    There was a ridge with a road that split the high point of the ridge. You could park on the north side, truck out of sight and get on the south side of the ridge. Chickens had a flight path along that ridge. They didn't come every day but if you sat that ridge for a week between about 4 -5, chickens would come by in strings maybe 3 days out of the week. If you were lucky and picked the right spot, you might get a shot or two. They always came from east to west.

    Now...as to cooking Chickens...never had that much success. As my mentor at that time said "Put the chicken in an old rubber boot, baked at 350 for an hour, throw away the Chicken and eat the boot". I don't think he was that far off.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,243

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chestle View Post
    I've killed a few somewhat north of Tipton, KS.

    There was a ridge with a road that split the high point of the ridge. You could park on the north side, truck out of sight and get on the south side of the ridge. Chickens had a flight path along that ridge. They didn't come every day but if you sat that ridge for a week between about 4 -5, chickens would come by in strings maybe 3 days out of the week. If you were lucky and picked the right spot, you might get a shot or two. They always came from east to west.

    Now...as to cooking Chickens...never had that much success. As my mentor at that time said "Put the chicken in an old rubber boot, baked at 350 for an hour, throw away the Chicken and eat the boot". I don't think he was that far off.

    submerge in a strong marinade for 48 hours.....then invite people you don't really like for dinner!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mineral Point,WI
    Posts
    180

    Default

    This is interesting but not encouraging . Thanks

  9. #9

    Default

    I've shot two in my life. Second one to confirm that I hadn't just messed up cooking the first one. We usually get a couple pointed every year here in KS. I'll not shoot another.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    26

    Default

    I've shot a lot of chickens. Mostly in Nebraska but also Kansas and South Dakota. I would never rely on pass shooting due to the success demonstrated in the above posts. Just go to Fort Pierre Grasslands and walk high ground with the wind at your back, yes, the wind at your back, and gradually work your way lower untill you find birds.

    If you're not up to much walking any game dept. staff will certainly give good local advice to a traveling 80 year old who wants a chicken. If you're there in early/mid October, ask game staff for a booming ground location. The males sorta congregate around booming areas in the fall due to the day light being the same as spring. Even fellow hunters on the grasslands will do what they can to help from a polite inquiry. The hardest part will be sorting chickens from sharptails. Good Luck!!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •