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Thread: crops aren't getting planted

  1. #81
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    The dough and dented numbers for corn are really behind. Not sure what these numbers mean...must be the overall ripening condition...thanks for posting, Bob.

  2. #82
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    Yes, dough and dented are stages. Dented is the final stage. It’s only 8/19. Still have another 6 weeks of growing. I think corn and beans will catch up and only be behind a week or two.

  3. #83

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    Talked two farmers today and both said crops looking great in their area. Both commented on needing heat units and a late frost to make for a good corn crop. One said he thought birds similar to last year and other just said seems like lots of birds if on the roads at the right times you see them. Won’t be long and we will know for sure.

  4. #84
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    SOUTH DAKOTA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION week ending 8/25
    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. August 26, 2019 - For the week ending August 25, 2019, there were
    5.4 days suitable for fieldwork, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short, 3 short, 72 adequate, and 25 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short, 3 short, 71 adequate, and 26 surplus.
    Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 3 percent very poor, 7 poor, 27 fair, 45 good, and 18 excellent. Corn silking was 97 percent, near 100 last year and 99 for the five-year average. Dough was 56 percent, well behind 93 last year and 85 average. Dented was 7 percent, well behind 53 last year and 32 average.

  5. #85
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    SOUTH DAKOTA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION
    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. September 3, 2019 - For the week ending September 1, 2019, there were 5.6 days suitable for fieldwork, according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short, 3 short, 73 adequate, and 24 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 0 percent very short, 3 short, 72 adequate, and 25 surplus.
    Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 2 percent very poor, 6 poor, 27 fair, 49 good, and 16 excellent. Corn dough was 76 percent, well behind 97 last year, and behind 92 for the five- year average. Dented was 18 percent, well behind 71 last year and 53 average.
    Soybean condition rated 2 percent very poor, 7 poor, 32 fair, 46 good, and 13 excellent. Soybeans blooming was 96 percent, near 100 both last year and average. Setting pods was 85 percent, behind 99 last year and 97 average.

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by watermen View Post
    El Nino is holding on and looks to be a wet spring and summer. Most northern guys are planning on beans all ready. Price with tariff war and lack of contract increases is gonna make it tough this year.
    Warm blob in the pacific is forecast to hold on through fall, hip boots may be needed. Can anyone say record rainfall?

  7. #87
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    Week Ending 9/22 SD Crop Report
    Field Crops Report: Corn condition rated 2 percent very poor, 5 poor, 27 fair, 51 good, and 15 excellent. Corn dough was 97 percent, near 100 for both last year and the five-year average. Dented was 71 percent, well behind 98 last year and 92 average. Mature was 12 percent, well behind 64 last year and 44 average.
    Soybean condition rated 2 percent very poor, 6 poor, 31 fair, 48 good, and 13 excellent. Soybeans setting pods was 97 percent, near 100 both last year and average. Dropping leaves was 30 percent, well behind 81 last year and 73 average.

  8. #88
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    Thanks, Bob. The dented number is way behind as well as the mature number...

  9. #89

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    Dented >>> It receives its name because of the small indentation ("dent") at the crown of each kernel on a ripe ear of corn.

  10. #90

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    Dr. Nielson, Purdue University

    Kernel Blister Stage.
    About 10 to 14 days after silking, the developing kernels are whitish 'blisters' on the cob and contain abundant clear fluid. Some starch is beginning to accumulate in the endosperm. The ear silks are mostly brown and drying rapidly. The radicle root, coleoptile, and first embryonic leaf have formed in the embryo by the blister stage. Severe stress can most easily abort kernels at pre- blister and blister stages. Kernel moisture content is approximately 85 percent.

    Kernel Milk Stage.
    About 18 to 22 days after silking, the kernels are mostly yellow and contain 'milky' white fluid. The milk stage of development is the infamous 'roasting ear' stage, that stage where you will find die-hard corn specialists out standing in their field nibbling on these delectable morsels. Starch continues to accumulate in the endosperm. Endosperm cell division is nearly complete and continued growth is mostly due to cell expansion and starch accumulation. Severe stress can still abort kernels, although not as easily as at the blister stage. Kernel moisture content is approximately 80 percent.

    Kernel Dough Stage.
    About 24 to 28 days after silking, the kernel's milky inner fluid is changing to a 'doughy' consistency as starch accumulation continues in the endosperm. The shelled cob is now light red or pink. By dough stage, four embryonic leaves have formed and about 1/2 of the mature kernel dry weight is now in place. Kernel abortion is much less likely once kernels have reached early dough stage, but severe stress can continue to affect eventual yield reducing kernel weight. Kernel moisture content is approximately 70 percent.

    Kernel Dent Stage.
    About 35 to 42 days after silking, all or nearly all of the kernels are denting near their crowns. The fifth (and last) embryonic leaf and lateral seminal roots form just prior to the dent stage. Severe stress can continue to limit kernel dry weight accumulation. A distinct horizontal line appears near the dent end of the kernel and slowly progresses to the tip end of the kernel over the next 3 weeks or so. This line is called the 'milk line' and marks the boundary between the liquid (milky) and solid (starchy) areas of the maturing kernels. Severe stress can continue to limit kernel dry weight accumulation. Kernel moisture content at the beginning of the dent stage is approximately 55 percent.

    Physiological Maturity.
    About 55 to 65 days after silking, kernel dry weight usually reaches its maximum and kernels are said to be physiologically mature and safe from frost. Physiological maturity occurs shortly after the kernel milk line disappears and just before the kernel black layer forms at the tip of the kernels. Severe stress after physiological maturity occurs has little effect on grain yield, unless the integrity of the stalk or ear is compromised (e.g., ECB damage or stalk rots). Kernel moisture content at physiological maturity averages 30 percent, but can vary from 25 to 40 percent grain moisture.

    Harvest Maturity.
    While not strictly a stage of grain development, harvest maturity is often defined as that grain moisture content where harvest can occur with minimal kernel damage and mechanical harvest loss. Harvest maturity is usually considered to be near 25 percent grain moisture.

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