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Thread: S.d. "predator control" program

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    21

    Default S.d. "predator control" program

    Attention pheasant hunters - newsflash.
    This is a pathetic, ill advised, non scientific, knee jerk, moronic idea. One that has been implemented. Massive waste of dollars to boot. Too bad for South Dakota............

    https://gfp.sd.gov/bounty-program/

  2. #2

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    Sounds like a good idea to me, no harm in trying it

  3. #3

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    I think DU or Delta waterfowl (?) did a study on this a few years ago and found it to be effective, but labor intensive. Might be worth a shot, could give some high school kids some spare change and a little outdoor skills. (until their parents deal with the skunk smell)

  4. #4
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    Oct 2016
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    Sioux Falls, SD
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    840

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan swamp collies View Post
    I think DU or Delta waterfowl (?) did a study on this a few years ago and found it to be effective, but labor intensive. Might be worth a shot, could give some high school kids some spare change and a little outdoor skills. (until their parents deal with the skunk smell)
    One thing it's doing is giving people practice cutting tails off road killed coons. I wonder if the study factored that into its results.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by termo View Post
    Attention pheasant hunters - newsflash.
    This is a pathetic, ill advised, non scientific, knee jerk, moronic idea. One that has been implemented. Massive waste of dollars to boot. Too bad for South Dakota............

    https://gfp.sd.gov/bounty-program/
    And what PETA CHAPTER is it that you belong too—

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    21

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    Quote Originally Posted by david0311 View Post
    And what PETA CHAPTER is it that you belong too—
    Funny.
    Hunting since 1974.
    B.S. Fish and Wildlife Management Montana State Univ. 1991
    30+ years in the wildlife management profession.
    21 long guns in the safe.
    2 pointers.
    Pan fried Crusted rooster breasts dipped in honey, broccoli, and garlic fettuccine for dinner tonight. Grilled elk backstraps last night.

    Predator control and bounties are a great 1937 idea.

    Carry on.
    Last edited by termo; 04-10-2019 at 05:08 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Cunningham, Kansas
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    2,303

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    On a number of occasions I have fallen back to mathematics on this forum to explain difficult situations. This is easily one of those. Yes, predator control has been found effective in a number of situations. Those situations had mathematics on their side. These experiments used an extreme effort of predator control on a manageable sized tract of land. The removal overlapped the nesting season and was carefully planned and monitored. The shotgun approach being used will not mimic those conditions and don't do either the hunting of fur-harvesting sports any favors by diminishing the value of one wildlife resource over another. In fact, in many people's eyes it will cast a dark shadow over both pursuits and give hunters and trappers a black eye no matter whether it is slightly successful or not! Management takes proven methods to address a measured problem. This is a political cash cow that will do nothing more than disperse many of the limited funds available for wildlife management out to an effort that is a failure even before it is enacted! Welcome to the Forum Termo!!!
    Trust the dog!

    Troy Smith

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Rolla Mo
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    267

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    I agree with you on the perceived political fallout Troy. I am curious how removal of predators will not benefit the prey species. The time of year they are removed has little impact on their overall population provided they reach a tipping point and are not replaced at a higher rate than their removal. Mathematically it would not matter the timing of the removal, just that the total biomass of mesopredators was reduced. A reduction of predator population individuals in the fall or spring before their own reproduction cycle, has little affect on the number of predators on the landscape during nesting season. I don't agree with the methods, however I can assure you it is very effective after a year like this where the cover has been squashed to drive around South Dakota and shoot coons and especially skunks on their daylight treks during their own mating. I am not advocating shooting them, I can't offer an opinion on their current landscape populations compared to historical records. I can offer that their population is increasing in MO and has done so since the fur crash of the 80's. If you can find me a trapper that made money last year at $6 average for coons, I will kiss your ####. I don't know for sure that South Dakota had intentions to do so, but I feel they might have just been trying to put some gas money in the pockets of their trappers and predator guys. Otherwise, any body that knows anything about trapping knows you currently can't get most to participate in an expensive hobby. Strictly trying to use math to understand the issue. I do agree it will likely give trappers a bad name, Both of them.

  9. #9
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    Jun 2010
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    2,280

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prairie Drifter View Post
    On a number of occasions I have fallen back to mathematics on this forum to explain difficult situations. This is easily one of those. Yes, predator control has been found effective in a number of situations. Those situations had mathematics on their side. These experiments used an extreme effort of predator control on a manageable sized tract of land. The removal overlapped the nesting season and was carefully planned and monitored. The shotgun approach being used will not mimic those conditions and don't do either the hunting of fur-harvesting sports any favors by diminishing the value of one wildlife resource over another. In fact, in many people's eyes it will cast a dark shadow over both pursuits and give hunters and trappers a black eye no matter whether it is slightly successful or not! Management takes proven methods to address a measured problem. This is a political cash cow that will do nothing more than disperse many of the limited funds available for wildlife management out to an effort that is a failure even before it is enacted! Welcome to the Forum Termo!!!
    not an effective plan......no sense in sponsoring more habitat? always another tactic, more bad publicity than it's worth!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Cunningham, Kansas
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    Watermen, I have trapped since 1993. I have read many of the studies on quail, pheasant, and waterfowl concerning predator removal and nesting success. On a small scale, the removal of meso-predators can be successful, however the manpower needed to do this on a landscape level makes this an unreasonable expectation of success. Meso-predators move into open habitat almost as quickly as it becomes empty. That is why the projects that were successful continued their trapping/removal efforts throughout the nesting season. Much of the benefit is from reduction of nest predation, not adult predation, so the important timing corresponds with the nesting season. Another way to look at that is that is also during the time that the overall population is at it's lowest and the loss of a nest or hen may well cost the population an entire clutch or more. On the other side of the coin, any time we devalue a wildlife species, and support the same, we devalue ourselves and our sport. Yes, "modern" America is trending toward better meso-predator habitat and less upland bird habitat. However, these furbearers keep reproducing and have done so the entire time we have lived on this continent. We haven't eradicated any of them sans wolves and grizzlies and this program will have the same end. If a predator control program was going to work, we wouldn't have coyotes in good ole USA with all the effort that has been directed at them over time. It's just a lose/lose proposition. For trappers to be profitable going forward, someone is going to have to supplement them for their work. I just don't think that this is the right way.
    Trust the dog!

    Troy Smith

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