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Thread: Why farming is the way it is today

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    South Central, KS
    Posts
    538

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    If I've ever had any vitriol in my posts it's not directed at producers - I can't stand Big Ag/ Big Pharma - IE - Monsanto, Dupont, Bayer etc etc.

    I may need to make a tin foil hat but do not like it when very few control the food supply at the top which is what we've essentially switched to - I'd guess that's a lot of others issues as well - that or others that have vented don't know where or how to vent their displeasure at the way things are.


    Here's an interesting youtuber I've found and have been enjoying his videos. I dont know if he tracks his audience (he's posted a video talking about what he thinks the makeup is) but supposedly farmers and non farmers a like enjoy him.

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCp0...lJ1meYAQ6_37Dw

    https://www.mnmillennialfarmer.com/

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    127

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    I don’t take anybody in the ag industry too seriously when they start on about the evils of socialism.
    Last edited by s.davis; 01-19-2019 at 06:45 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    124

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    "Why "farming" is the way it is today"

    If we're talking about the steady drive towards increased yields, maximum production of land, less regard for wildlife and healthy ecosystems, lower requirements needed for man hour and labor ... like so many things it's all about the money.


    I'm from northeast Ohio and recently hunted the late season in Iowa with my young lab and we saw quite a few pheasants. I was very impressed with the comparatively high amount of set asides and crp grasses common in a lot of areas. Many years ago Ohio used to have a fairly good population of wild pheasants but it's gone to hell mainly due to the above mentioned drive of modern and industrial farming practices and land development. I saw and see it all happen first hand. It's very sad. Pheasants aren't the only species to suffer the consequences and decline. Depending on a small percentage of sparsely spaced parcels of public wildlife conservation areas just doesn't cut it in the long run. In a significant way wild pheasants are like the proverbial canary in the coal mine. Pay attention.
    Last edited by huntsem; 01-20-2019 at 02:58 AM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    543

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    Ive heard guys here (Tennessee) gripe when farmers don't have their silage chopped by the dove opener on 09/01/. Its like some think those guys are farming for them to have a great place to hunt. Ive never felt this way but do understand some of the complaints about the quality of habitat that the states (not just Kansas) choose to lease. I certainly appreciate those who take wildlife into consideration. As a person who has bills to pay , I understand that max profits are priority.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    27

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    You want farmers to farm the way they use to then call your congressman and tell them to quit subsidizing grain production. This ought to livin up the discussion!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lafayette, Colorado
    Posts
    315

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    Great post, and thank you for providing wildlife great habitat!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    2,241

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frangler View Post
    Great post, and thank you for providing wildlife great habitat!
    some of the hedge rows and shelter belts have existed for years....some were planted to reduce soil erosion during the dust bowl days...
    so now, today's farmers will go broke if they don't tear out the fence rows and tree lines and farm that extra 40 acres?
    or can't afford the extra 5 gallons of diesel to turn the harrow or planter to farm around habitat......ok, now i know what we are dealing with.

    i know i sure don't buy E-85 at the pump either.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    2,241

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbob131 View Post
    Awesome post!! I always wondered if it wouldnít be smart for a large organization like pheasants forever to buy the necessary equipment to put in buffer and filter strips themselves,rather than ask the landowner to do it himself. Kinda like a crew that did all the necessary paperwork for the farmer, and then did the disking/sowing. Iím sure it wouldnít be hard to partner with the local colleges and high schools. Kids wanting to get in either agriculture or conservation could use it as a coop.Iím sure lots of farmers donít sign up for such programs because all extra work just isnít worth their time.
    exactly, i asked a farmer about a similar deal with PF.......he said he didn't have time for such foolishness.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    374

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter94 View Post

    i know i sure don't buy E-85 at the pump either.
    So just for spite or you don’t like the product ?

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    2,241

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    Quote Originally Posted by McFarmer View Post
    So just for spite or you donít like the product ?
    no, not in spite..........pure E-85 does not get near the same mpg as does even blended varieties.......it sells for only 4 cents pure gallon less where i live. but starting this season it will be mandated to use as a blend in all gasoline, it was regulated in some areas to not be used in the summer months due to pollution factors.

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