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Thread: Why farming is the way it is today

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Wichita,KS.
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    1,193

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    Quote Originally Posted by KSBrittman View Post
    Fesntkilr ,

    Have you had a chance to use a stripper head on your Finney

    county ground ?

    As a producer is there a dollar amount per acre that would make it worthwhile for a producer to use a stripper head ?

    We hunted some ground in Ness county that had a stripper head used on it and it held good numbers of pheasants .
    We hunt a farmer in Ness county who uses a stripper head. Last year it looked like it layed over. Never went in it though.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
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    546

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    Quote Originally Posted by KSBrittman View Post
    Fesntkilr ,

    Have you had a chance to use a stripper head on your Finney

    county ground ?

    As a producer is there a dollar amount per acre that would make it worthwhile for a producer to use a stripper head ?

    We hunted some ground in Ness county that had a stripper head used on it and it held good numbers of pheasants .
    Sir , I assume a stripper head is a combine attachment of some sort? Would you mind explaining it ? Is it for wheat/ milo and leaves more stubble and cover instead of cutting it to the ground? Thanks!

  3. #13

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    Yes a “Stripper head “ is an head goes on a combine that removes grain from wheat by stripping the grain from the plant , seems to be very efficient , the combine doesn’t have to run large amounts of straw/ stem through the machine and it leaves the plant the original height .

    There was a study done at K- state and I think when wheat stubble was over 18 inches brood success goes up and incremenattley for every inch over 18 inches brood succes goes up expidentially.

    There are birds in it ,hunt against the combine tracks otherwise pheasants run like track stars down them .
    Last edited by KSBrittman; 01-18-2019 at 06:42 AM.

  4. #14

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    954C4428-8D76-4A16-B671-869F05211631.jpeg

    Here is an Idea , this is a spot up in Nebraska I hunted moved about 30 pheasants and a wintering flock of Prairie Chickens that had to be at least 50 birds in the flock .

  5. #15
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    Jul 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
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    Excellent idea! Thanks for the information. I have seen milo or wheat stubble that was higher than normal. A stripper head explains it. Do the farmers eventually bale the stubble or mow it off?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Wichita,KS.
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    Quote Originally Posted by esetter View Post
    Excellent idea! Thanks for the information. I have seen milo or wheat stubble that was higher than normal. A stripper head explains it. Do the farmers eventually bale the stubble or mow it off?
    I think they try to drill directly into it. But if it is played over there is to much residue and possible also doesnt dry out. I think you can cut about three times as fast and save money on herbicides, but have to invest in a header specifically for wheat.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Lawrence, Kansas
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    4,127

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    Stripper heads make a big difference in creating pheasant habitat. Back when farmers let wheat stubble become weedy after harvest, these fields were often the best for hunting because they provided both food and lodging, especially the terrace channels. Stripped wheat stubble is at least one step back to that.

    IMO, it's a wacky thought process that leads folks to think they are entitled to go on private property due to the presence of wild game. Wild game does not belong to everybody; it belongs to nobody, but a properly licensed hunter has the privilege to bag a limit.
    Last edited by BritChaser; 01-19-2019 at 01:35 PM.
    - From the office of Colt, Stoeger, Browning & Savage
    - Kansas: Big Cock Country

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    751

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    Fsentkilr, that was a great post and thanks for taking time to share. I appreciate great landowners like you.
    Bilbo Baggins

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    20 miles south of Ft. Worth, Tx
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    Stripper heads are better for upland birds. They are not cheap bits of equipment though and they're really only for small grain cereal crops (think wheat, barley, etc.) So most small operations are not going to buy a stripper if they have a combine and a crop rotation the is the typical wheat/beans/corn combo so prevalent in the plains states like SD. Having PF provide stripper heads for harvest is unlikely just because of numbers. In a county area, everybody harvests at pretty close to the same time and when the time is ripe they want to get done ASAP. PF would need a LOT of stripper heads.

    Now a larger operator that does a lot of small grain work (think custom cutters), well, stripper head makes sense.

    As for farmers/ranchers, OF COURSE their main obligation is to their family and their operation. All the ones I know have a VERY good handle on the cost of operation and how to get maximum efficiency and results. Think precision ag. That's the way it should be. With the price of land, the price of supplies (seed, fertilizer, etc) the price of equipment it's dang hard right now to show a good profit. Crop prices are currently pretty low. It can be tough right now to show the banker a plan that shows cost of operation and net income that will put a smile on a bankers face.

    Is precision ag the best for upland habitat? Probably not. It's just too clean and maximizes land use. However, it is here to stay and the producers need it to do well. All in IMO.

    All that brings me to the idea that while we hunters need to support the producers wholeheartedly, we should also be pressing for more public hunting land AND MUCH BETTER HABITAT on the public land that is currently available.

    Just my .02. I hope all our grandkids can enjoy hunting like we have as we grew up.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Delavan, WI
    Posts
    42

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    Thanks for doing this, as an individual in the Ag business I cringe at a few of the posts regarding farmers on this site.

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