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Thread: Field Bred Springer

  1. #1
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    Default Field Bred Springer

    Besides physical characteristics & family tree full of trial dogs, how do you tell a field bred springer from a bench bred one?

    For example, if a "serious hobby breeder" says the sire & dam of a litter are both field bred dogs, how might that be confirmed?
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  2. #2
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    Lots of pictures with a beak out one side of their mouth, feet out the other side and lots of feathers in between. What do I know, Im just a simpleton.
    Mike

  3. #3
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    You're saying THIS is what I'm looking for??? (Buzz)
    buzz3.jpg
    buzz2.jpg
    buzz1.jpg
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by A5 Sweet 16 View Post
    Besides physical characteristics & family tree full of trial dogs, how do you tell a field bred springer from a bench bred one?

    For example, if a "serious hobby breeder" says the sire & dam of a litter are both field bred dogs, how might that be confirmed?
    I think physical characteristics are a big clue. Field bred and bench Springers look entirely different. Almost like two different breeds. Bench dogs are larger, have longer ears and longer hair. Your best bet is to buy from a proven field bred Springer breeder like FCSpringer on this site. If I was looking for a field bred Springer I would look no further than Ken's dogs. And he's not far from you as he is in the Alexandria, MN area. Here' his web site. http://www.bluerivergundogs.com/ I see from his site that he is having a litter this month.
    Janee's August Breeze - Bree
    7/6/2016
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5

    Godfather's Dakota Elle - Elle
    1X NSTRA Champion
    11/16/2008 - 11/22/2016
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5

  5. #5
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    As a lab guy I feel the bench and field dogs have evolved to nearly 2 different breeds in physical appearance as well as temperament. I think the same has happened to springers. Typically even serious hobby breeder's pedigrees will be stacked with field titled dogs back a generation or so. Dont let one FC\AFC dog back 5 generations in a pedigree fool you as they aren't contributing much to the gene pool anymore.
    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  6. #6
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    The physical characteristics ARE the dead give away. If you can read a pedigree and know the lines that may give you a clue before you even see a picture, but overwhelmingly they are completely different looking animals. Bench dogs are generally bigger/bulkier, longer hair, longer ears, blocky heads and muzzle as can be seen on the left photo vs field Springer on the right. Of course if your buying from backyard breeding then it's always possible you may have both mixed in there.


    Our family had a Bench Springer when I was growing up and she was quite big at 55 lbs.

    benchfield.jpg
    Last edited by birdshooter; 01-03-2019 at 10:45 PM.

  7. #7
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    Great shots of the late, great, Buzz!

    All the comments are spot on; think of a canine comparison between a full back and a wide receiver.

    As for disposition, my limited experience between the two breedings is that the Field Springer is more congenial, but that's from a small set of data.


    Enjoy the search.
    Kis
    For hunters, Fall is the island towards which we swim all year.

  8. #8
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    I have a line on a litter that hopefully will happen about April 1. Breeder that I trust (not a pro). Dam would be Buzz's sister. To me, that's a very good thing.

    Potential sire will be a dog in Colorado the breeder knows well. They say he's field bred, but his pedigree means nothing to me, as it doesn't have the designations FC, NFC, AFC, or anything of the sort. Just normal old dogs.

    So short of trying to research the dogs listed on his pedigree (& basically go by hearsay & what people might remember about the dogs), physical appearance is the BEST I have to go by? And probably meeting the sire?
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  9. #9
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    I would talk to FCSpringer and see if he can shed any light on the pedigree.

    That said, regardless of pedigree there is nothing like seeing dog flesh in person. Some things a pedigree can't tell tell you, such as temperament, demeanor etc..I know it's a long way to travel, but would it be worth it to you to arrange a visit to see the sire in person and maybe even see him work?
    Last edited by birdshooter; 01-04-2019 at 12:04 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdshooter View Post
    I would talk to FCSpringer and see if he can shed any light on the pedigree.
    Yes, I'd really appreciate any input from him. But.....I get why he'd hesitate to give advice on how to buy a dog from somebody he might see as competition. (possibly even the type of competition he'd rather see vanish from the face of the earth)
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

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