Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: Hevi-Shot Hevi-Metal Pheasant Loads

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Delavan, WI
    Posts
    39

    Default

    I just can't get back on the Hevi Shot bandwagon, had too many of their shells fail on my when duck hunting to go back to them. Out of half a case I had 2 instances where a shell didn't go off after a solid primer strike and another where there was an dud that sent the wad halfway down the barrel and the pellets rolled out the end of my gun. Had a buddy shooting out of the same case that 3 more failure to fires.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Knoxville TN
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Joe Hunter That's a lot of good information. Just curious what your thoughts are on lead shells. Typically I shoot a Browning 625 with Carlson Prairie Storm chokes Mod and IC.

  3. #23

    Default

    My group has seen outstanding results with 3" Black Cloud in #4 and #3. After several years use I am a believer.

  4. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MinnHunter View Post
    My group has seen outstanding results with 3" Black Cloud in #4 and #3. After several years use I am a believer.
    Shoot what you like, but I shoot traditional spherical steel loads when using nontoxic on pheasants. Steel shot lethality research conducted on pheasants by Tom Roster showed #2 steel to be more effective (at all ranges) than #6 or #4 steel. Yes, #4 and #6 steel loads will kill'em, but a little extra pellet energy is a good thing on wild pheasants where shots can get on the long side. The research also showed #2 steel resulted in fewer cripples than both #6 and #4 steel. And, Roster speculated that the #3 steel pellet would be a good compromise between pellet count and downrange energy.

    Here are a few of my pattern numbers to show the performance differences I found with my gun/choke between some of the traditional low-cost steel loads and the older Black Cloud loads.

    Patterning results from a 12-gauge 3-inch Remington 870 Special Purpose with a 28" barrel and factory flush Rem-chokes (pattern average of five, 30" post-shot scribed circle, yardage taped muzzle to target, in-shell pellet count average of five, and true choke constriction from bore gauge).

    40 YARDS Mod. (.018" const.)
    Federal Speed-Shok 3" 1 1/4 oz #2 steel (154 pellets) pattern 115 (75%)
    Federal Black Cloud 3" 1 1/4 oz #2 steel (144 pellets) pattern 92 (64%)
    Hevi-Metal 3" 1 1/4 oz #2 / #5 (164 pellets) pattern 93 (58%)
    HEVI-STEEL 3" 1 1/4 oz #2 steel (148 pellets) pattern 100 (68%)
    Kent Fasteel 3" 1 1/4 oz #2 steel (155 pellets) pattern 103 (66%)
    Remington Sportsman 3" 1 1/4 oz #2 steel (152 pellets) pattern 110 (72%)
    Winchester Xpert 3" 1 1/4 oz #2 steel (146 pellets) pattern 106 (73%)

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Joe Hunter; 09-16-2019 at 09:18 PM.

  5. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dakotasj View Post
    Joe Hunter That's a lot of good information. Just curious what your thoughts are on lead shells. Typically I shoot a Browning 625 with Carlson Prairie Storm chokes Mod and IC.
    Thanks for the kind words.

    Here are a few of my pattern numbers from 20- and 12-gauge lead loads, that I’ve shot pheasants with, to give you an idea of the kind of performance you might get from similar loads and chokes.

    Inside of ~40 yards, the No. 6 lead pellet is adequate for pheasants, but when shots start getting on the long side (40 yards and longer) you’ll be better off with the No. 5 lead pellet! Of course, you’ll need to choke your load, regardless of shot size, to maintain adequate pattern density for the typical distance of your shots.

    Patterns from 20- and 12-gauge Browning Citoris with 28" Invector-plus barrels and Briley flush chokes (patterns average of five, 30" post-shot scribed circle, yardage taped muzzle to target, and in-shell pellet count average of five).

    20 GA 2 3/4" RELOAD (BLUE DOT)
    1 oz #6 lead (233 pellets) @ 1200 fps
    30 YARDS – SK / pattern 147 (63%)
    30 YARDS – IC / pattern 168 (72%)
    40 YARDS – M / pattern 146 (63%)
    40 YARDS – IM / pattern 163 (70%)

    20 GA 3" RELOAD (BLUE DOT)
    1 1/8 oz #5 lead (190 pellets) @ 1200 fps
    30 YARDS – SK / pattern 140 (74%)
    30 YARDS – IC / pattern 150 (80%)
    40 YARDS – M / pattern 138 (73%)
    40 YARDS – IM / pattern 147 (77%)

    12 GA 2 3/4" RELOAD (GREEN DOT)
    1 1/8 oz #6 lead (267 pellets) @ 1225 fps
    30 YARDS – SK / pattern 171 (64%)
    30 YARDS – IC / pattern 211 (79%)
    40 YARDS – M / pattern 182 (68%)
    40 YARDS – IM / pattern 195 (73%)

    12 GA 2 3/4" RELOAD (UNIQUE)
    1 1/4 oz #5 lead (210 pellets) @ 1225 fps
    30 YARDS – SK / pattern 145 (69%)
    30 YARDS – IC / pattern 177 (84%)
    40 YARDS – M / pattern 155 (74%)
    40 YARDS – IM / pattern 174 (83%)
    50 YARDS – IM / pattern 125 (60%)

    Hope this helps, good luck!
    Last edited by Joe Hunter; 09-16-2019 at 09:04 PM.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    760

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Hunter View Post
    Steel shot lethality research conducted on pheasants by Tom Roster showed #2 steel to be more effective (at all ranges) than #6 or #4 steel.
    Outside 30-35 yards, steel 2's are so ballistically superior to steel 4's & 6's (even the screaming fast ones), that it's not even funny. Hyper-velocity steel loses its velocity (& energy) very, very quickly.
    I don't shoot steel at pheasants anymore, in lieu of better stuff, but when I did, 3's & 2's performed way better than any smaller sized shot.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Knoxville TN
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Thanks for the information. I typically shoot lead where allowed and the last few years have been pleased with the Prairie Storm #5, sometimes drop to #4 late season. My steel shot choice is usually #3, but occasionally #2. My experience is that I fail to recover fewer hit pheasants with lead than steel.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    235

    Default

    I bought two boxes of these https://www.hevishot.com/catalog/hevi-metal-pheasant/ from Cabelas several years ago to hunt the refuge. Mine are in #5 shot and I think they are 1500 FPS. I haven't fired many of them but they do kill pheasants, BUT if the bird is close it really tears them up and they kick like hell in my 6lb 8oz sxs. Last year I tried some 3" #4 steel Remingtons that worked the same. One of the reasons I bought the hevi-shot is because my SXS is only 2 3/4".
    When the ones I have are gone, I doubt that I will buy more but they will probably last me for a long time.
    P.S. I didn't receive any promotional swag for my comments.
    Last edited by airmedic1; Today at 08:46 AM. Reason: SP
    Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but talent instantly recognizes genius.
    - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •