Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Noise

  1. #1

    Default Noise

    I always try to be quite while me and my dog hunt due to when I make noise I feel like the pheasants flush way up ahead. I hunt pressured public and have had birds flush on a calm day when you quietly shut the truck door. When hunting thick willow swamps or cattails, I cant always see my lab and don't want her getting too far out. I have thought of the bell but think the added noise will put the birds on alert and flush them to far out. What is everyones opinions about adding a locator bell to the collar?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Lonsdale, Mn
    Posts
    213

    Default

    I have 2 very small labs, both weigh around 40lbs so they are tough to see in cover taller than waist high. I run my e collar and then run a normal collar with 2-3 of their rabies tags on them, the sound of the tags hitting each other is enough I can always tell where the dogs are when in the field and isn't overly loud as to send birds flying to early. Personally the sound of me walking through the cover is louder than the dogs tags on their collars.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    834

    Default

    I was out last week and we had birds pile out on adjacent land as we pulled up and got ready, didnt matter much as it was private. We hunted 4 days killed 12 and probably should of killed 20. I ran silent, beeper and bells depending on how thick the cover was. Had birds shoot over points or birds that flushed within 15 yds. Some areas the birds flushed if you slowed down. I dont consider myself a quite hunter, but have always done well in SD. Will some birds move out cause of the noise yes, will some birds flush as normal yes, so i would say add the bell if it spooks all the birds remove it. Just my 2 cents.
    River - 2 yr old English Setter
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5
    Bella - 4 yr old Brittany
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5
    Ellie - 5 yr old Yellow Lab
    Jazi - 12/30/2005 -- 10/13/2017
    Kaci - 3/23/01 - -10/8/15

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    SW NoDak
    Posts
    218

    Default

    We run French Brits. Smallish dogs. Our first one was a tricolor that was mostly black and brown. In other words, damn near impossible to see in heavy cover. Started with nothing. Went to a bell. Didn’t seem to bother the birds much. That was fine until she went on point the noise stopped. Went to beeper collars. Usually just use the locate function but in heavy cover (cattails, tumbleweeds, high clover, etc) the beep on point function is perfect. Noise is important but just walking cover makes plenty of noise. Take a shot and every bird in the section knows you are there. No need to get so paranoid about noise that you become nonfunctional.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Spring Grove, IL
    Posts
    1,705

    Default

    Most times I take a piece of black tape and take my pups tags to the ring and collar to eliminate the jingling. I need all the help I can get.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    728

    Default

    It's helpful to be able to hear your dog in order to locate him, but don't go overboard. Quieter is almost always better. There's a big difference between a bird hearing a shot & knowing there's something loud 1/2 mile away somewhere, and a bird hearing the constant jingle of a bell, or sound of a person's voice, which allows him to pinpoint you exactly.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  7. #7

    Default

    Quieter always better , I almost always put my dogs training collar on a mile or so away from where I plan to hunt , my vest is on , gun close at hand , dog box and tailgate opened quite , running a tri- tronics Upland special with locate mode and no beep until dog goes on point then Hawk Scream .

    Approaching birds from the less obvious direction / away from parking lot if on public good approach if it will safely work out .

    Always shoot more birds with a couple dogs and 2hunters using hand singnals than a big group making a lot of noise ,

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    461

    Default

    Yup they bust you worse than whitetails. I’ve always had the best luck alone and into a some wind, and absolute silence with the dog. Even then it’s tough.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    198

    Default

    Quiet is definitely better when hunting public, approach the entire hunt like you are on a silent stalk of a big game hunt.

    I have a lab, when training him as a puppy I started with whistle training. 1 whistle meant sit, 3 whistles meant come. Once I introduced him to the E-Collar, which has a shock function and beep function, I then trained him that 1 beep meant sit, 3 beeps meant come. Over the years as my time spent training has decreased and his natural hunting ability has increased, it has more so transitioned into a series of beeps just means you're too far away and move closer to me. Anyways, it has allowed us to be quiet and still communicate with each other. Very rarely do I have to say anything while hunting. If I happen to lose him while hunting cattails I can usually just stop moving for a few seconds and eventually hear or see the busting through the cattails to locate where he's at.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    728

    Default

    Rereading this whole thing. Question was basically, "Will a bell on my lab make smart, public birds (presumably wild) flush far away?" They won't necessarily flush. They may just make themselves invisible. Pheasants can do that - easily. They're masters of evasion & they'll use the safest route possible. They only flush if THAT's the safest route. A bell will no doubt allow them to know precisely where you & the lab are & give them a better chance of evading you one of 100 different ways. 5-10 yards makes big difference sometimes, & the easiest way to gain that extra distance on them is through stealth & confusion. On public land birds especially, quiet is key! No talking. Use hand signals to the dog & to other partners. Hunt "backwards" from the way most people hunt an area. Hunt into the wind. No bells or other jing-tinglers. Not saying you can't shoot some public land birds with a bell on your dog...but most times, your chances diminish.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •