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Thread: 3 days in South Dakota

  1. #21

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    SD is a great place to hunt. Best success would occur on return visits or when heading to that state with friends or family that has visited there before. Learning curve on most new hunting venues can be steep unless the area is well populated or under utilized or you are just darn lucky.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    20

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    I just returned home this evening from my second trip of the season. Hunted mostly public around Huron. Iíve hunted this area for the past 11 years and have made two trips most years. The first several years the hunting was absolutely incredible! This trip was exactly opposite and as far as bird numbers it was by far the worst. Far fewer while hunting and just a handful each morning while driving/scouting before 10 am. The opener was a bit better for us this year so we were looking forward to our late season trip. Talked to several guys at the hotel and everyone seemed to be struggling. We still had a great time and Iím counting down the days to do it again. Good luck the rest of the season!!
    Last edited by boomer1; 12-03-2018 at 10:23 PM. Reason: Spelling error

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    830

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRITTMAN View Post
    The issue I would have is if SD issues hunter success (birds harvested per hunter) based on preserve data inclusion. That and I guess buyer beware, but then again those that frequent high end guided operations likely do not frequent this site and most likely could care less where the pheasant was born and raised. Their motto is often "let's limit early so we can get back to the lodge".
    I believe hunter success statistics DO include preserve data, since the data comes from surveys sent out randomly to those who purchased licenses. Since preserves, by law, have to release 1 rooster for every 1 shot, they're going to skew the numbers more on "bad" years than on good years, since the clients most likely "get their birds" regardless of the wild bird population. After a few weeks, my guess is that preserve "hunters" are shooting about 100% pen raised birds.

    Yes, to each, his own. I don't care what type of birds a guy likes to "hunt". But I personally don't see the joy in killing a bird that's so incredibly stupid & wouldn't present the least bit of a challenge to a decent pheasant dog. Oh sure, there may be released birds in this world that live long enough to develop defense & self-preservation tactics that begin to act sort of wild-ish. But not in South Dakota. They don't live long enough. I ran into a few birds on a WPA a few years back that had been banded & released by a local conservation group as part of a fund raiser. (Don't know if they were actually released ON that land, or if they just ended up there.) But the 3 banded birds I shot acted NOTHING like a wild one. In each instance I actually saw Buzz chasing the stupid thing through the grass before it finally achieved liftoff. And I've stopped to flush birds in mowed ditches near preserves. They're not bothered by cars. Don't try to escape or even hide most times. And once they realize a springer is on his way, they just try to run down the ditch. These are the birds (as seen on Youtube) that allow a big group of guys, all shouting "Rooster!!" at the top of their lungs & yelling at their dogs, to get within shotgun range.

    Not for me. But....I did get to meet a couple people from that conservation group after I called to inquire about the bands. Anyone who shot a banded bird got his/her name in a hat for a shotgun drawing. I asked them to pick 3 kids of group members & put their names in the hat. And.....I got a little bling for my transmitter.
    transmitter bling.jpg
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    331

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRITTMAN View Post
    Agree most hunters never see a released bird hunting in SD.

    The issue I would have is if SD issues hunter success (birds harvested per hunter) based on preserve data inclusion. That and I guess buyer beware, but then again those that frequent high end guided operations likely do not frequent this site and most likely could care less where the pheasant was born and raised. Their motto is often "let's limit early so we can get back to the lodge".
    The preserve harvest I believe is included in total harvest numbers but SD GF&P does not attempt to hide much when it comes to preserves, what the harvest is and how many birds they release. Preserve harvest numbers have been pretty consistent over the last 5-years while the overall harvest has been more variable.

    https://gfp.sd.gov/shooting-preserves/

    The released bird issue is way more complex when it comes to SD vs. anywhere else. Seems every year some newspaper does a story on it. The pheasant farms like attention and throw crazy numbers out there on how many birds they are sending to SD (which isn't supported by the GF&P data). People who hunt at the preserves go home & help perpetuate a get a limit every day in SD myth that was tough enough to do on public land even in the good years. Guys travels to SD over confident, under prepared and hunt public land only to struggle. Get frustrated and jump on the SD is overrated & tainted by released birds side of the interwebz conversations etc. etc.

    Truth is freelancing on public land is a challenge everywhere but SD is still the best place to do it and some people may pass on that opportunity because of all chatter around the above....
    Chasing Roosters with a flushing dog on public land. As God intended.......

  5. #25

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    Very Well Said!

    I agree!



    Quote Originally Posted by Downtown Bang! View Post
    The preserve harvest I believe is included in total harvest numbers but SD GF&P does not attempt to hide much when it comes to preserves, what the harvest is and how many birds they release. Preserve harvest numbers have been pretty consistent over the last 5-years while the overall harvest has been more variable.

    https://gfp.sd.gov/shooting-preserves/

    The released bird issue is way more complex when it comes to SD vs. anywhere else. Seems every year some newspaper does a story on it. The pheasant farms like attention and throw crazy numbers out there on how many birds they are sending to SD (which isn't supported by the GF&P data). People who hunt at the preserves go home & help perpetuate a get a limit every day in SD myth that was tough enough to do on public land even in the good years. Guys travels to SD over confident, under prepared and hunt public land only to struggle. Get frustrated and jump on the SD is overrated & tainted by released birds side of the interwebz conversations etc. etc.

    Truth is freelancing on public land is a challenge everywhere but SD is still the best place to do it and some people may pass on that opportunity because of all chatter around the above....

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    719

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    Quote Originally Posted by Downtown Bang! View Post
    The preserve harvest I believe is included in total harvest numbers but SD GF&P does not attempt to hide much when it comes to preserves, what the harvest is and how many birds they release. Preserve harvest numbers have been pretty consistent over the last 5-years while the overall harvest has been more variable.

    https://gfp.sd.gov/shooting-preserves/

    The released bird issue is way more complex when it comes to SD vs. anywhere else. Seems every year some newspaper does a story on it. The pheasant farms like attention and throw crazy numbers out there on how many birds they are sending to SD (which isn't supported by the GF&P data). People who hunt at the preserves go home & help perpetuate a get a limit every day in SD myth that was tough enough to do on public land even in the good years. Guys travels to SD over confident, under prepared and hunt public land only to struggle. Get frustrated and jump on the SD is overrated & tainted by released birds side of the interwebz conversations etc. etc.

    Truth is freelancing on public land is a challenge everywhere but SD is still the best place to do it and some people may pass on that opportunity because of all chatter around the above....
    Lots of truth in this post!
    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    24

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    I have been here for 3 days and should of had my limit in an hour each day. Have ended up with 3,1, and 2. I have shot horrible except for the first day. I walked 10.5 miles today and had decent shots at 5 roosters. Itís not the easiest but itís hard to complain when I have had the opportunity. Canít really ask for anything more.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    24

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    Forgot to say all public.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    842

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    I will be heading out with my son on the 14th for a week hunt. We hunt public land and we have aleays done well, some days its easier than others. Looking forward to our trip and hoping mother nature cooperates with us.
    River - 2 yr old English Setter
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5
    Bella - 4 yr old Brittany
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5
    Ellie - 5 yr old Yellow Lab
    Jazi - 12/30/2005 -- 10/13/2017
    Kaci - 3/23/01 - -10/8/15

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2,272

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flushedup View Post
    While I can't argue with your last sentence, the rush of the flush and "warming the ol' gun barrel" is a big part of it. If you want to sit back and be theological, go ahead but there is a reason its called hunting and not sunset watching.

    I can only hope that one day, it will be close to the first year I ever hunted out there, 2010. (which wasn't even the best)
    no.........there are NOT plenty of birds any longer up here...it is very different from what it used to be. you can focus on the sunrise, sets, rolling hills and be nostalgic all you want.......most people drive a considerable distance to have a decent chance at a limit everyday.
    and that experience is dwindling fast.....the pen raised birds being released are not the answer...i say it is foolish to pay to hunt these birds, drive so far and pretend SD is the pheasant capital of the world......habitat is shrinking fast, 300K + of CRP is coming out in next 12 months or so.....with over 200 pay to hunt operations up here it is obvious how the bird population and habitat is trending. farmers will tell you it is not looking good either....it is not going to change, the state officials see the obvious decline, farming and profits drive how the land is used......not a bad thing, just reality...no use fooling ourselves.

    it was fun while it lasted. staying home, saving a lot of money and hunting the same pen raised birds here.

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