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Thread: Heel Blister Prevention Tips and Tricks?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    28

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    Irish setter havocs style 801 I believe really will help.

  2. #22

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    I have worn multiple pairs of Meindls for many years. When new, they fit me fine but as they wear and the leather stretches, they definitely give me more heel issues, as well as toe bang against the front of the toebox. I think they are well made boots but they don't fit my feet perfectly. I used to do survey work in them and with daily use had no issues. But with occasional use I have had problems. If your boot fits correctly you shouldn't need liner socks, vaseline, tape, or any of the other remedies mentioned. I suggest trying a different brand of boot. I have worn Salomons for about 5 years now and love them. They make several lighter models that are more of an athletic fit and much lighter than a leather boot, just as warm, and almost as weather resistant. I can wear these straight out of the box with zero break in and hike for many miles over rough terrain with no blisters. I do lots of hiking and backpacking in the mountains with these and they are amazing. I also have a pair of their winter boots and they are very warm for hunting when snow is on the ground, and a lot lighter than Sorels. I don't miss my traditional leather boots at all and will probably never go back.

  3. #23

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    Yeah, get some wolverine vortex boots. I have some that cost around 150 that are excellent. I've had them for 6 years now.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    461

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    My hunting boot fit is the same as my downhill ski boot fit and my running shoe fit. Any kind of heel lift in any will blister you, and take some of the fun out of the activity. You should try any or all of the suggestions here, but in the end, if you can’t keep that heel in place you might want to talk to Santa about making a change. The size and width of the boot is important, but the boot height also plays a part in how your foot behaves when you are humping it on all different terrain types. I settled into Havocs and Keen Targhees (6” uppers) and Muck Uplanders and Wetlands in cold weather/deep snow. Good luck fixing the problem or finding the right boot. I’ve found that a more flexible soled boot will make that heel stay home, and behave.

  5. #25

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    Some people tend to blister more than others. Best solution to treat is 2nd Skin. A gel pad. I have been using them on the athletes I have coached for over 20 years now. Works great. Then get a proper fitting boot.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    498

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    When I was a kid my father would tell me every time before heading afield - you can ask me to stop 10 times a day to ‘prevent’ blisters and I won’t get mad. We’ll put on dry socks, a dab of Vaseline, moleskin or dust tape and tighten your boots. But ask me to stop ONCE to TREAT a blister that has already happened, and you’re in trouble mister!

    I’ve lived by that - prevention prevention prevention. I know that is not helpful advice for you now that you have them. So in that regard, the company “Band Aid” makes these gel thingies that you stick over the existing blister and it’s surprisingly helpful. They are very tapered down to the edges so it doesn’t ‘roll up’ when you resume movement. But they hurt to take off. Another option are the Dr Scholls ‘corn rings’ - they are made of adhesive moleskin an make a ring around the blister and hold your sock up off it. I have made similar custom ‘rings’ out of moleskin to build up around the blister. Advantage is when you take them off you’re not tearing blistered skin.

    In terms of prevention, I’m a big fan of liner socks as mentioned by others, something slippery like silk or polypro. I know the Cabela’s and wigwam socks mentioned above as well, and will add to that a sock called Wright Sock, which is a similar double sock with a the liner sewn in. Huge fan of those. Changing socks more often helps a lot as well. And yet, boot fit of course. Last trick that I use when hunting pheasants dawn to dusk is to change boots at lunchtime. They’re dry and have different pressure and rubbing points.
    Cheers,
    Dave

  7. #27

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    Go to 2:30 to skip ahead. Alot of good information about boots, not just kennetrecks
    https://youtu.be/SENbp-ZCiLw

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    611

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    Quote Originally Posted by david0311 View Post
    ? Good Lord—Get Rid of the boots and spend some money on a quality boot that fits—why mess around with such an important part if not the most of your hunting gear—JMO
    Exactly. His boots don't fit and the problem will only get worse.

    Good boots are essential. Spend the money and get Russells. Guaranteed to fit, custom made. I love mine.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    461

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    Ya I know your right. With all the footwear out there blisters shouldn’t even be on your radar screen. Find the right boot. No reason to create a sequel to the Revenant in this day and age.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    SW Missouri
    Posts
    1,013

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    Duct tape before the blister starts.

    If you’re too late, duct tape over the blister.

    Just as good as moleskin. And more uses.

    I’m on my never ending search for the perfect boot.

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