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Thread: Dog ranging Out to far

  1. #21
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    Some good points above. Steps that may need to be taken: "Whoa" training, an essential for an upland dog's safety and his master's happiness afield. I leash walk my dog every morning and teach and practice whoa during the walks. I train to whoa on both "whoa" and a short whistle note so as to avoid speaking while afield if possible. I think putting the dog on some kind of lead initially is essential to whoa training, maybe with a spike collar. You might put the e-collar on the dog while whoa training and tone or vibrate him simultaneous with whoaing. Once the dog is 90% whoa trained, use the e-collar to enforce it while afield; first a tone and then immediately followed by a shock if the tone is ignored. Following these guidelines I have had excellent control over my brittanys.
    Last edited by BritChaser; 11-21-2018 at 12:39 PM.
    - From the office of Browning, Colt, Winchester & Savage

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by MAcDonTom1 View Post
    Does anyone know of an e-collar system that you can set up to correct the dog if it ranges out too far? I have a Dratharr that wants to get too far out and flush birds, he'll case pheasant that run I'd like to find a collar that automatically corrects him if he gets out more than 40 yards
    ??? BEFORE YOU RUIN THAT DOG—GET TOGETHER WITH SOMEONE THAT KNOWS WHAT THEY ARE DOING—
    A e-collar is not a automatic training device —it’s only something that should be used by someone that knows what they are doing—and how to use one
    To be blunt—that’s not you

  3. #23
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    Here's the bottom line on this subject. An ecollar is a great tool but used incorrectly will do more harm then good. Correcting your dog with one when he's hot on birds could lead to blinking. It would be similar to a dog put thru rattlesnake avoidence training. Done enough the dog may begin to avoid birds when he makes scent. This is called "blinking". When this happens you have a real problem on your hands.
    Last edited by birdshooter; 11-22-2018 at 08:51 AM.

  4. #24
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    Apr 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdshooter View Post
    Here's the bottom line on this subject. An ecollar is a great tool but used incorrectly will do more harm then good. Correcting your dog with one when he's hot on birds could lead to blinking. It would be similar to a dog put thru rattlesnake avoidence training. Done enough the dog may begin to avoid birds when he makes scent. This is called "blinking". When this happens you have a real problem on your hands.
    Good to have the attitude that the most dangerous thing that you are carrying in the field is your collar, more so than your gun. I've hunted with guys that in my opinion, misuse, and their dogs were pyschological train wrecks. Dogs don't routinely carry tape measures, and have to be taught what 25 yards means. I'm sure there are better methods, but not being a dog trainer, I resort to tone, vibrate, and stop and kneel, and praise to teach her distance and to look back. Imo dogs are like teenagers, they respond poorly to constant yelling and punishment, and end up secretly hating you. I'm still working on the whoa command, and I use "stay" instead when I want her to stop, but I try to hunt in silence with her, so I only use it when she's on point and when I take the trash cans down to the road. I don't know anything about dog training, so I had to resort to applying the same principles that you use when I raised my kids and watch my grandkids. Gotta keep it really simple; stay out of the road, stay close, have fun, stop what you are doing, come. Like raising kids and grandkids, it's a lot of work and it's never complete. Always a work in progress.

  5. #25
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    The real bottom line is a pointing dog shouldn’t be forced to work close
    they have a natural range and you need to adapt to it and understand how to use it to your advantage

  6. #26
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    Apr 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobman View Post
    The real bottom line is a pointing dog shouldnÂ’t be forced to work close
    they have a natural range and you need to adapt to it and understand how to use it to your advantage
    Yes, I know that's the right approach and I'm working on it. When I hunt downwind I let her range out some and she natually hunts back to me. When I hunt into the wind she wants to stay tighter, for some reason. I'm still learning. It's the first pointer I've had, so very different. When I hunt alone with her, which is most of the time, I let her go a little because we are so quiet. In a group when there's a lot more noise, I like her a little closer. Those SD birds are hard to pin down. That I know for sure. She's a French spaniel, and not a far ranging dog. They hunt pretty tight, actually. Very timid breed. Gotta be real careful about how you correct them, or they'll end up hunting behind you. She has presented me with quite s few really close shots, which works for me, cuz my shotgun skills beyond 35 yards are not great. Sure is fun out there. Leaving again tomorrow. Wife won't move there. Darn!

  7. #27

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    Not sure why you would want a pointing dog to only range 40 yards? I have a little cocker and I want her going out about 40 yards in a downwind and she is a flusher! If the dog is pointing why would you need to keep it within that 40 yards?
    To be fair I have seen many pointing dogs at hunt clubs working in what I consider a good range for a spaniel or flushing dog and never could figure out why that is?

  8. #28
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    Apr 2013
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    Default Too far

    Quote Originally Posted by chrokeva View Post
    Not sure why you would want a pointing dog to only range 40 yards? I have a little cocker and I want her going out about 40 yards in a downwind and she is a flusher! If the dog is pointing why would you need to keep it within that 40 yards?
    To be fair I have seen many pointing dogs at hunt clubs working in what I consider a good range for a spaniel or flushing dog and never could figure out why that is?
    Her range really varies a lot with the cover that I hunt and the wind direction. Cattails she naturally wants to hunt close because she wants to know where I am and is always checking back. Thick grass cover she is out farther. Thin cover, which I donÂ’t hunt all that often, IÂ’ll let her go and watch her just for fun. Into the wind she naturally hunts pretty close, downwind she ranges and hunts back to me. I have been really careful to let her hunt and not over-control her. I think that each dog is different within the same breed, and will find their pace and distance with experience. I would say that on average she is within 25 to 45yards 85-90 of the time, just because thatÂ’s where she seems to be comfortable. She does this without a word being said, just the beep of the collar. IÂ’m not one to just let her go and hope that she occasionally pins down that rooster 60 yards in front of me, while flushing five birds for everyone she pins down. Show me a dog that consistently pins down wild South Dakota roosters for a walk in shot, without wild flushes, and I will gladly buy the owner a four pack of Todd the Axeman IPA from the Surly Brewing Company, and a chunk of Wisconsin aged cheddar. Haha

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrokeva View Post
    Not sure why you would want a pointing dog to only range 40 yards? I have a little cocker and I want her going out about 40 yards in a downwind and she is a flusher! If the dog is pointing why would you need to keep it within that 40 yards?
    To be fair I have seen many pointing dogs at hunt clubs working in what I consider a good range for a spaniel or flushing dog and never could figure out why that is?
    Best pheasant dog I ever owned was a little lewellin setter that quartered like springer. Could out hunt any dog alive and never ranged more than 40-50 yds. That's why. I did all of her basic training and after her first season I sent her to Scott Miller. He used to have a 6 week refresher course that he would hold at the end of hunting season. When he had her there he told me she was the best dog in kennel. And he had numerous national field champions.
    Last edited by westksbowhunter; 11-28-2018 at 10:05 PM.

  10. #30
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    Central MN
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    I've stayed out of this as I'm a retriever guy and know little about pointers. Maybe I should have started a separate thread as this isn't geared towards any of the above comments.
    I've always thought the idea of a pointer is a dog that covers lots of property and then points the bird till the hunter catches up. Now I understand why someone might want a HUGE running dog and others may prefer a closer working dog. But ideally if a close working dog cuts sent and is working a bird why would you not just let him go and catch up? Why make him work like a flusher/retriever? Seems like using a crescent wrench as a hammer, it only kind of works. Let him use his natural ability to your advantage.
    PS I have owned a pointer or two and enjoyed them. I would probably still have a GSP if I didn't like playing retriever games in the off season, a guy can only have so many dogs (i think).
    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

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