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Thread: Upland bliss

  1. #11
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    My dad trained gun dogs for a living for many years. His personal dogs were field trial dogs. Of those one was a FC, another QAA and another was a young male that made the derby list but died at 2 years of age due to unknown circumstances. He had many other field trial dogs but those are the ones that I can remember. He washed out a few due to them just not being able to compete at that level.

    All of his field trial labs doubled as duck dogs as well. There is absolutely nothing like hunting over a dog that is steady, will mark multiple falls, and birds that fall a long way out. Also having a dog that can run blinds for those birds they didnít see fall. So the misconception that field trial dogs canít hunt is just that, a misconception. Iíd much rather hunt over a finished retriever than a meat dog any day. Not to say there is a darn thing wrong with a meat dog but itís just darn nice to never have to leave the blind or walk your dog to the area of a fall and have them hunt the area. You can handle your dog to the bird from the front of your blind.

    I donít do field trials but I do run hunt tests. And my current BLF is a finished dog capable of all the above. Just a joy to hunt with. And the absolute most satisfaction one gets is knowing you trained the dog to that level. Just insist on the same standard while hunting as you do while training and the transition back is nearly invisible.
    G
    Last edited by duckn66; 11-13-2018 at 08:59 PM.

  2. #12
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    Sep 2011
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    Have any of you guys that hunt pheasants with a duck dog ever hunted with a real bird dog? I know it's very common these days to use labs for pheasants but a good setter or pointer will run circles around a lab. My llewellin will find 10 birds to every one a lab finds. No offense I love all sporting dogs. But they call them bird dogs for a reason

  3. #13
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    Nov 2015
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    Quickdraw

    "I know it's very common these days to use labs for pheasants" - Quickdraw. There's a multitude of reasons for that. How does your Llewellin do whilst hunting standing corn (crickets chirping). Two different breeds, two different styles of hunting. My Labs hunt upland birds and waterfowl as well, and are hunting machines. Your statement that your "Lewellin will find 10 birds to every one a Lab finds" is ludicrous and based on what? A hollow argument at best Mate.

    Irishwhistler 🍀🇮🇪🇺🇸

  4. #14

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    Agree with Irishwhistler. That's an incredibly bold statement quickdraw. I have a very difficult time believing your Llewellin would find 10 birds to every one a quality lab finds (I have a golden but I'm guessing your opinion is the same as they are similar breeds). They simply hunt different. My buddy has a brittany that we go to SD with. Comes from top of the line blood-lines and is a hunting machine. Had 2 separate occasions where he hit a cripple and couldn't find them last SD trip, I came over with my golden and he was able to find both birds that his brittany couldn't with my "duck dog". A simple bird down command and he quartered the brush and found both birds very much alive.

    My uncle has a golden that will turn 9 this fall that he has killed north of 600 public land pheasants over hunting mostly by himself. I can't even imagine what that number would be if he were hunting with a "real" bird dog.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by grossklw View Post
    Agree with Irishwhistler. That's an incredibly bold statement quickdraw. I have a very difficult time believing your Llewellin would find 10 birds to every one a quality lab finds (I have a golden but I'm guessing your opinion is the same as they are similar breeds). They simply hunt different. My buddy has a brittany that we go to SD with. Comes from top of the line blood-lines and is a hunting machine. Had 2 separate occasions where he hit a cripple and couldn't find them last SD trip, I came over with my golden and he was able to find both birds that his brittany couldn't with my "duck dog". A simple bird down command and he quartered the brush and found both birds very much alive.

    My uncle has a golden that will turn 9 this fall that he has killed north of 600 public land pheasants over hunting mostly by himself. I can't even imagine what that number would be if he were hunting with a "real" bird dog.
    GROSSKLW,
    Spot on Mate. Apples to oranges on face value, two entirely different breeds and hunting styles. Ye cannot really compare the two. I enjoy hunting over pointers, setters, and Labs. Each have their own strengths. Not questioning the breeds at all, more so, the experience level of Quickdraw for making such a ludicrous assumption. Certainly not a science based argument.

    Irishwhistler 🍀🇮🇪🇺🇸

  6. #16

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    Couldn't agree more. Quality hunting dogs find birds, simple as that. I like hunting over my golden and flushers in general, he likes hunting over his pointer; we both kill a pile of birds and have a blast doing it. I'm sure she finds a few birds mine doesn't because he's working too quickly and I know he finds a few in heavier cover that she passed over because it was too thick for her to go into.

  7. #17
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    No questions the labs ability to find cripple and hard to find dead bird. I bam saying abird dog will find far more birds than a waterfowl dog. I hunt with friends that own labs. When was the last time a lab became the Grand national champion never. W have 500 acres near white lake sd. A couple years ago I took a little ride to check out some new area. Up near Miller I found a nice looking spot. About 10 acre low spot surrounded by cut corn. 3 guys with 3 labs were loading up the truck. They said it's a waste of time no birds in there anymore. They left. Me and my llewellin went in the cover I had my 3 in about 20 minutes. The birds were all holding tight for the point those guys walked right by them. The point is you will see a lot more game with a good bird dog. I t would be even better if you had a lab as well.

  8. #18
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    QuickDraw you have obviously never hunted pheasants with a good lab. I have lots of photos to back up my lab as a pheasant hunter. A lab isn’t just a waterfowl dog. A good lab is well rounded and can do it all. ‘

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quickdraw View Post
    Have any of you guys that hunt pheasants with a duck dog ever hunted with a real bird dog? I know it's very common these days to use labs for pheasants but a good setter or pointer will run circles around a lab. My llewellin will find 10 birds to every one a lab finds. No offense I love all sporting dogs. But they call them bird dogs for a reason
    A good pointer will run circles around every bird dog out there and find more birds as well. But only because of the amount of real estate being covered.

  10. #20
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    Nov 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quickdraw View Post
    No questions the labs ability to find cripple and hard to find dead bird. I bam saying abird dog will find far more birds than a waterfowl dog. I hunt with friends that own labs. When was the last time a lab became the Grand national champion never. W have 500 acres near white lake sd. A couple years ago I took a little ride to check out some new area. Up near Miller I found a nice looking spot. About 10 acre low spot surrounded by cut corn. 3 guys with 3 labs were loading up the truck. They said it's a waste of time no birds in there anymore. They left. Me and my llewellin went in the cover I had my 3 in about 20 minutes. The birds were all holding tight for the point those guys walked right by them. The point is you will see a lot more game with a good bird dog. I t would be even better if you had a lab as well.
    Seriously? You are going to argue your assertion on the abilities of Labrador Retrievers as an entire breed comparative to Llewellins based on a three dog anecdotal accounting as assessed by yourself. Seems less than an objective study. Way less than scientific to reasonably reach any such conclusion. What were the ability levels of the 3 Labradors in your sampling? Were they titled dogs trained and handled by pro's or advanced amateurs? Were they out of great bloodlines or backyard breedings of unknown genetics? If they had titles, which titles and at what levels? And the same questions would need to be applied to your comparative Lliewellins and the sample would need to be far more than one dog. Two different breeds, two entirely different hunting styles. Put your Llewellins on a hunt in high standing cover or corn and make your comparison of the two breeds or flushers vs. pointing dogs. Your question regarding "when was the last time a Labrador became a Grand National Champion" is nonsensical. Which championships are you referencing? You do realize that the two breeds mention are worked in entirely different hunt test and field trial games and for good reason they are type specific? What is your experience level as a trainer / handler to be making this generalization regarding an two entire and very different breeds? Lastly what is the registered name of your Llewellin and what titles does it hold? Trained by you or a known pro?

    THE DOG WHISTLER 🍀🇮🇪🇺🇸

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