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Thread: Upland bliss

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    175

    Default Upland bliss

    Aye Mates,
    Headed out with one o' me gunning Mates (Bill) for some upland bird hunting today. We had three Labrador Retrievers of varying ages and abilities with us. We worked the dogs individually so that we could concentrate on the specific needs of each dog.

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    HAT TRICK
    Me 5 year old gun dog TRAD is always fun to watch working birds as his persistence cover hugging roosters is nothing short o' relentless.


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    ALLIE MAE
    Now 18 months old, this yellow female British Labrador sired by me gun dog TRAD is really coming into her own during her debut season. ALLIE MAE is owned by me gunning Mate Bill.
    We worked ALLIE MAE on remaining steady to wing, shot, and fall during today's hunt, marking skills, and game bird recovery in heavy cover.



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    WHISTLE STOP
    Eight month old MAC is being hunted during his first season with emphasis on maintaining obedience and control whilst afield. Here MAC immediately sits upon a single blast o' me whistle and remains seated until released. MAC was further worked on sitting and remaining steady upon wing, shot, and fall, marking the flight and fall o' the bird, and being released by name to make the retrieve. MAC is expected to return to the handler and sit at heel to make a classic presentation to hand upon issue o' the command "GIVE". MAC was sired by me gun dog TRAD and is out of a different dam than his half sibling ALLIE MAE. MAC is coming along tremendously well very early on in his development as a gun dog.


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    MAC HOLD
    Upon is return o' the successful retrieve o' this rooster pheasant from challenging cover, MAC is issued the commands to SIT and HOLD. An intensely focused and highly bird driven pup, our hunts with MAC are specific to establishing the control needed to move onward to more complex and advanced levels of training. This young pup loves to work and the retrieve has already been established as the ultimate high value reward for MAC.


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    UPLAND BLISS
    T'was a grand day afield for meself and Bill as we gunned for upland birds and watched our retrievers meeting the training objectives we have focused upon and applying those attained skill sets during practical field experience.

    Faugh A Ballagh,
    THE DOG WHISTLER 🍀🇮🇪🇺🇸

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    32

    Default

    Sounds like a blast! Glad you and the pups had a chance to get on some birds! Great post! Stright shooting!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    175

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by uplandPheasent112 View Post
    Sounds like a blast! Glad you and the pups had a chance to get on some birds! Great post! Stright shooting!

    Aye Mate,
    T'was grand fun and always good getting out with me dogs. 👍

    Cheers to ye,
    Mike 🍀🇮🇪🇺🇸

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    461

    Default

    Geez those are great pictures. Can’t believe the clarity and contrast in the colors. Good job!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    175

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    Quote Originally Posted by mgorvi View Post
    Geez those are great pictures. Canít believe the clarity and contrast in the colors. Good job!

    I do a lot o' sporting dog photography👍. Thanks for ye commentary.

    Cheers,
    Mike 🍀🇮🇪🇺🇸

  6. #6

    Default

    Hec k yeah, long live the lab!! I have a yellow, and she is top shelf.I did not do any training,just hunted a lot.She works close, and retrieves to hand.I did use a retrieving dummy when she was a puppy.I would like to get a black puppy, but I don't want to make my yellow mad.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Centennial, CO
    Posts
    108

    Default

    Whistler, I have a question. Are you spending the time to train them so well with the intent of field trials? Just for your own hunting? Breeding credentials?

    I ask, as I have hunted with some poorly-trained and non-trained dogs that were not any fun to hunt with. I have also, only recently, hunted with a very few dogs where the owners spent lots of time training their pups, and they are a joy to hunt over. It seems that very few dog owners spend the time to train a dog for hunting, unless they are going to use them for field trials or breeding. Not a problem if that is the goal, but I like to hunt with dogs whose "purpose" is hunting, and not for show. I have also been told that dogs that are excellent in field trials often don't make good hunters outside of the competitive arena. It sounds like you and your hunting buddies have put in lots of time training your dogs, and the results look

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    175

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Logical View Post
    Whistler, I have a question. Are you spending the time to train them so well with the intent of field trials? Just for your own hunting? Breeding credentials?

    I ask, as I have hunted with some poorly-trained and non-trained dogs that were not any fun to hunt with. I have also, only recently, hunted with a very few dogs where the owners spent lots of time training their pups, and they are a joy to hunt over. It seems that very few dog owners spend the time to train a dog for hunting, unless they are going to use them for field trials or breeding. Not a problem if that is the goal, but I like to hunt with dogs whose "purpose" is hunting, and not for show. I have also been told that dogs that are excellent in field trials often don't make good hunters outside of the competitive arena. It sounds like you and your hunting buddies have put in lots of time training your dogs, and the results look
    Aye Mate,
    Interesting questions ye pose. The answer is actually "all of the above". I have been a hunter for nearing 50 years (upland birds, waterfowl, and big game as well). My love for sporting dogs started early on in life and I owned hounds as a young lad and have been working, training, competing, and living with retrievers for over 35 years. I train a limited number of client dogs each year. Additionally, I have my own personal gun dogs that I also run in both AKC and HRC hunt tests. My main focus with every retriever I choose to work with is to make that retriever a highly competent gun dog that is a pleasure to hunt over. Some of the dogs I train as gun dogs go on to become hunt test K9 athletes as their owners see the potential for their dog(s) to thrive in that arena. Other dogs I work with are trained specifically as gun dogs (most being cross trained to hunt both upland birds and waterfowl). I set very high standards for the dogs that I work with and I train diligently to have those retrievers succeed in meeting those standards.

    I spend numerous hours each week focused on the dogs I work with. I personally have no interest in "showing" dogs for breed conformation. I have bred my current sire twice to two really nice dams and have to date produced 16 beautiful pups from those two breedings. Both of those breedings have been by request for my sire as a stud for those dams by their owners (one of those dams is owned by my veterinarian). Any breeding agreements I enter into are specifically with a focus on proper health clearances and for the betterment of the breed. I would never have my sire bred to an unsuitable dam with improper health clearances and that did not possess the traits I look for with the objective of producing great field performance retrievers.

    As for field trial dogs being unsuitable as hunting dogs, that simply is not accurate. Many serious field trailers do not hunt their trial dogs because they want a dog that handles in direct response to the handler and does not hunt instinctually on it's own. I have also known of many field trial and hunt test retrievers that are incredible hunting gun dogs as well. The matter can be over simplified or needlessly complex and really is determined by breeding and training toward specifically desired skill sets and behaviors. My personal dogs both hunt and hunt test and are a joy to work with in both regards. In general all dogs are individuals with specific needs and many overlapping behavioral norms. Usually dogs with the right breeding and diligently applied training by a competent trainer will rise to attaining high standards of field performance that will make them a joy to hunt over. Conversely, it has been my experience that the majority of problems or poorly performing dogs are created by their owners or incompetent trainers. Essentially, outstanding performance will be proportional to the efforts made in providing a gun dog prospect with competent and methodical training designed with success of that retriever as it's ultimate objective.

    I live, train, and hunt test specifically to hunt birds over my dogs.

    I hope that answers your questions satisfactorily.

    Cheers Mate,
    THE DOG WHISTLER 🍀🇮🇪🇺🇸

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Centennial, CO
    Posts
    108

    Default

    "I hope that answers your questions satisfactorily.

    Cheers Mate,
    THE DOG WHISTLER"

    Absolutely! Thanks for the in-depth explanations, and debunking the field-trial/hunting dog misinformation. I don't have first-hand experience with hunting over a field-trail dog, so that information was given to me (by a hunting-dog owner).

    Best wishes this hunting season, and in your field trials!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    175

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by logical View Post
    "i hope that answers your questions satisfactorily.

    Cheers mate,
    the dog whistler"

    absolutely! Thanks for the in-depth explanations, and debunking the field-trial/hunting dog misinformation. I don't have first-hand experience with hunting over a field-trail dog, so that information was given to me (by a hunting-dog owner).

    Best wishes this hunting season, and in your field trials!
    roger that. 👍

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