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Thread: Shooting

  1. #1
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    Oct 2015
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    Centerville, MN
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    Default Shooting

    I've noticed myself missing a lot of first shots but hitting on the second. Any general theories as to why on this? Rushing? Seems like I shoot my first and then dial in on the second based off the miss. I dont feel as if im rushing but having a tough time drawing and getting on it for the first shot.

    -Thanks
    Last edited by TBIRD19; 10-30-2018 at 03:01 PM.

  2. #2
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    Oct 2016
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    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBIRD19 View Post
    I've noticed myself missing a lot of first shots but hitting on the second. Any general theories as to why on this? Rushing? Seems like I shoot my first and then dial in on the second based off the miss. I dont feel as if im rushing but having a tough time drawing and getting on it for the first shot.

    -Thanks
    My theory, based on LOTS of pheasant hunting, is that yes, you're probably rushing, but there may be a little more to it. It's so easy to be flustered by a flush, so we think the bird will be gone before we know it, so I have to get my shot off quick. This isn't usually the case. But it takes experience & the confidence gained from it to be able to take that extra second, collect your wits, get your footing right, safety off, get the barrel moving and outward & stock up to your shoulder/face....all while seeing the bird as clearly as possible & focusing on its head/beak (not that huge tail). Taking that extra second helps your brain really see how fast & what direction the bird is moving & before you know it, your barrel is moving & pretty well in the right spot at the same time your mount is completed. I think a lot of people SNAP the gun up first, & then all the other stuff has to catch up, which is difficult with a gun mounted. Instinct tell us to SHOOT as soon as our gun is mounted; not do all the other stuff. It's simply a function of practice. Also, I see a lot of people carry their guns down at their sides or over the shoulder. MUCH easier to quickly do the things described above from a port arms carry position. My $0.02.
    "Most pheasants in South Dakota don't react too well to #5s." -The Hunt for Red Rooster

  3. #3
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    Oct 2015
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    Centerville, MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by A5 Sweet 16 View Post
    My theory, based on LOTS of pheasant hunting, is that yes, you're probably rushing, but there may be a little more to it. It's so easy to be flustered by a flush, so we think the bird will be gone before we know it, so I have to get my shot off quick. This isn't usually the case. But it takes experience & the confidence gained from it to be able to take that extra second, collect your wits, get your footing right, safety off, get the barrel moving and outward & stock up to your shoulder/face....all while seeing the bird as clearly as possible & focusing on its head/beak (not that huge tail). Taking that extra second helps your brain really see how fast & what direction the bird is moving & before you know it, your barrel is moving & pretty well in the right spot at the same time your mount is completed. I think a lot of people SNAP the gun up first, & then all the other stuff has to catch up, which is difficult with a gun mounted. Instinct tell us to SHOOT as soon as our gun is mounted; not do all the other stuff. It's simply a function of practice. Also, I see a lot of people carry their guns down at their sides or over the shoulder. MUCH easier to quickly do the things described above from a port arms carry position. My $0.02.
    Thanks A5, exactly the sort of elaboration I was looking for more than the short answer of "rushing". Many good points noted. Especially the SNAP & SHOOT logic, I can totally relate to that. Thanks for taking the time. lots of help. Keeping these theories in mind while afield

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Watertown, SD
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    5,985

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    I think A5 Sweet 16 makes some good points. I would also ask the following:

    What gun are you shooting?
    What gauge are you shooting?
    What is your gun choked?
    What is the length of barrel?
    What shells are you shooting?
    What size shot?
    Janee's August Breeze - Bree
    7/6/2016
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5

    Godfather's Dakota Elle - Elle
    1X NSTRA Champion
    11/16/2008 - 11/22/2016
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5

  5. #5
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    Jul 2013
    Location
    Northern Alberta
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    My experience after over 50 years of shotgunning is that the first shot on a bird is often high , and if it is a crossing shot, behind as well, same as on a skeet field .
    When the bird is flushed a rushed shot normally involves the cheek off the gun ( hence the high shot) and pointing directly at the bird instead of leading and swinging ( resulting in missing behind)
    Regardless of the gun I am using , if I miss , I know exactly why and can correct on the second shot ( hopefully!)😜
    DT

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Minnesoooota
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    Quote Originally Posted by A5 Sweet 16 View Post
    My theory, based on LOTS of pheasant hunting, is that yes, you're probably rushing, but there may be a little more to it. It's so easy to be flustered by a flush, so we think the bird will be gone before we know it, so I have to get my shot off quick. This isn't usually the case. But it takes experience & the confidence gained from it to be able to take that extra second, collect your wits, get your footing right, safety off, get the barrel moving and outward & stock up to your shoulder/face....all while seeing the bird as clearly as possible & focusing on its head/beak (not that huge tail). Taking that extra second helps your brain really see how fast & what direction the bird is moving & before you know it, your barrel is moving & pretty well in the right spot at the same time your mount is completed. I think a lot of people SNAP the gun up first, & then all the other stuff has to catch up, which is difficult with a gun mounted. Instinct tell us to SHOOT as soon as our gun is mounted; not do all the other stuff. It's simply a function of practice. Also, I see a lot of people carry their guns down at their sides or over the shoulder. MUCH easier to quickly do the things described above from a port arms carry position. My $0.02.

    +1

    I agree that you are likely rushing and or having foot placement issues.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Minnesoooota
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBIRD19 View Post
    I've noticed myself missing a lot of first shots but hitting on the second. Any general theories as to why on this? Rushing? Seems like I shoot my first and then dial in on the second based off the miss. I dont feel as if im rushing but having a tough time drawing and getting on it for the first shot.

    -Thanks
    I posted this a while back, two short instruction videos on foot work and gun mount as it relates to wingshooting. Both of which can be practiced at home with an UNLOADED gun.

    https://www.ultimatepheasanthunting....-makes-perfect
    Last edited by birdshooter; 10-30-2018 at 08:20 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    South Dakota
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    I used to run into this issue when I was in my teens and shooting with my dad. He was a bit faster than I was and I know I was rushing. Now in my 30's and hunting with my own dog and notice I miss a lot less than I did with him. We still hunt together quite a bit but our shots are almost simultaneous now. Either he's slowed a bit in his 50's or I've gained a bit after 20 years of shooting experiences. One thing I have started doing is anytime I stop I have my feet in a shooting position. Took some practice to train myself to that but now it's second nature.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Great lake state
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    The mount don't have to be fast but it does need to be smooth, you can practice that at home all year.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Dakota
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    558

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    I would throw out there if your mounting your gun and waiting for the bird to create distance a guy or gal can end up aiming taking the focus off the bird and onto your bead, a recipe for a follow up shot. Good shooters like Quailhound or CarpTom or pulling the trigger shortly after they mount, a very instinctive or snapshot style. Your choke also may be tight for close flushing birds.

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