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Thread: Prarie Storm

  1. #11

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    The shells worked ok but are super super tight. I patterned them from a skeet choked barrel on an old Remington 1100 at 30 yards. The pattern looked like a full choke plus. So, I would only use them if I needed the range, maybe in late season. They are a nice option if you need to tighten up a open choke. BTW, Black Cloud Steel pattern the same way.

    MG

  2. #12

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    Thanks for the information appreciate it

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Minnesoooota
    Posts
    2,596

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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Hmm must've had a bad box. Took the gun in to a gunsmith right after and was told that everything looked good. It's a real A-5 Belgium made from the 50's with a polychoke.
    So George, have you shot other brands of ammo without this problem?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    36

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    I suppose using Prairie Storm sometime after the first shell (starting with the 2nd or 3rd shell) in a single-barrel gun would be like having 2 different chokes.

  5. #15

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    Birdshooter yea Iíve shot other brands mostly Winchester and Remington loads just seem to have bad luck with Federals

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    204

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    Too close and they tear the bird up.

  7. #17

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    Prairie Storm cartridges are like many other marketing gimmicks. They do not have to work, they only have to sell.

    Several years ago, I was in Gallanson's Gun Shop in Salt Lake City. They were selling the wads that are used in Federal's Black Cloud and Prairie Storm shells.

    I then did some extensive reloading and experimenting with these. I determined a couple of things. First, I could duplicate the patterning of these loads by proper choke selection. Second, these wads are very susceptible to the effects of wind. Any crosswind of 10 mph or greater moved the shot charge in a downwind direction considerably (greater than a conventional wad).

    I kept 25 of the wads and traded off the rest to a guy in Texas who wanted to develop a long range Sandhill Crane load.

    Killing pheasants does not require magic chokes or magic wads or square or Saturn shaped shot.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Parker, CO
    Posts
    26

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    I shot them out of a Browning Citori Feather 12 Gauge and they are extremely dirty. After shooting three or four shells, my action would not completely close and I didn't notice until a bird flushed. I ended up having to clean the face of the action very well to get my gun to function.

    They hit very hard but after that I won't be wasting money on them again.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Northeastern Ontario
    Posts
    15

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    My group started using them in SD when they first came out in 12 and 20.
    They are to kick ass for grouse and woodcock.I use them strictly for pheasant mostly 20 gauge one ounce. I have shot hundreds of shells over the years and my opinion is that they are very very good shells.
    .Ive also shot Kent,fiocchi golden pheasant reming Winchester etc.etc.
    The original question was not comparing prairie storm with others so I won't comment that way but I can attest to them really smacking the birds.I use a Belgium a5 in a 20.make sure your springs and braking system are set up properly.If you haven't change your action spring in the last 20 yrs or so may I suggest you spend the 10 bucks and replace it.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    SW NoDak
    Posts
    218

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    I like them. Particularly for less than 10 bucks a box. Walmart sells them for 14.97 a box. Federal offers a five dollar a box rebate every year when you buy a case...split cases qualify.

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