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Thread: The only good news to report.....

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Falcon, CO
    Posts
    71

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    As a former wildlife biologist who worked quite a bit with pheasants, how exactly do you identify a 5 year old bird?? Anyway...multiple studies on pheasants show that 90% of a populationís roosters can be killed without affecting the following yearís reproduction/population. Ring-necked pheasants are highly polygamous and aggressive breeders.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Falcon, CO
    Posts
    71

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    Oh BTW, a high percentage of yearling roosters in the hatch is indicative of a good hatch. Years with a high percentage of 1-1/2 year old birds (or older - rare) are indicative of a poor hatch...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    344

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    Quote Originally Posted by marshrat View Post
    As a former wildlife biologist who worked quite a bit with pheasants, how exactly do you identify a 5 year old bird?? Anyway...multiple studies on pheasants show that 90% of a population’s roosters can be killed without affecting the following year’s reproduction/population. Ring-necked pheasants are highly polygamous and aggressive breeders.
    Well said marshrat. I just came from the Hi-Line where there is good habitat we found good bird numbers. I am not going to be bullied by anyone to stop hunting pheasants. Neither my dog or myself are getting any younger. Assuming there is a good habitat, when weather cooperators numbers will recover.
    "It takes birds to make a bird dog"

  4. #14

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    You may want to consider why it is that so many locals who actually live up here on the Hiline put our shotguns away this year. No BS, just the truth. Think about this also, when your out stomping around the "good habitat" you found, how many hen's do you flush from that secure habitat into sparse habitat where they are easier prey for hawks, owls, and eagles? I chose to be a conservationist instead of a hunter for pheasants and hun's this fall, not bullying anyone, just stating my opinion, which is based on actually living in the place you visit occasionally.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Montana Husker View Post
    You may want to consider why it is that so many locals who actually live up here on the Hiline put our shotguns away this year. No BS, just the truth. Think about this also, when your out stomping around the "good habitat" you found, how many hen's do you flush from that secure habitat into sparse habitat where they are easier prey for hawks, owls, and eagles? I chose to be a conservationist instead of a hunter for pheasants and hun's this fall, not bullying anyone, just stating my opinion, which is based on actually living in the place you visit occasionally.
    I've hunted the high line, I've hunted around Roy, I've hunted out east, helk, I've hunted the flint creek valley, and I agree, birds are down. That being said, I've only been skunked a few times, and I hunt a lot.Central has been good this year.

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