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Thread: Scammers!!!

  1. #11
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    I met a guy and his son once who were hunting the same private land we were hunting. My buddy and I were almost done shooting our limits and the day was still young! I asked them how they were doing since they did not have a dog. They said they hadn't seen or shot a bird yet that day. I invited them to join us and I helped the son shoot his first rooster! That was a highlight of the day for me. teaching him how to watch the dogs, how to get ready for the flush, how to identify the rooster from the hen, even practice on when to release the safety. I like to think I made a hunter out of that dad and his son that day. I probably also helped out fellow breeders when they saw the difference a dog makes in the field. I wasn't scammed yet I hunted with someone I did not know and it turned out great for everybody!

  2. #12
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    goldenboy you reminded me of something I read the other day. I must admit hunting is my time to get away. Relax and unwind it is all about me. Something to think about.

    https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/selfi...-/?published=t

  3. #13
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    Oct 2016
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    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldenboy View Post
    I met a guy and his son once who were hunting the same private land we were hunting. My buddy and I were almost done shooting our limits and the day was still young! I asked them how they were doing since they did not have a dog. They said they hadn't seen or shot a bird yet that day. I invited them to join us and I helped the son shoot his first rooster! That was a highlight of the day for me. teaching him how to watch the dogs, how to get ready for the flush, how to identify the rooster from the hen, even practice on when to release the safety. I like to think I made a hunter out of that dad and his son that day. I probably also helped out fellow breeders when they saw the difference a dog makes in the field. I wasn't scammed yet I hunted with someone I did not know and it turned out great for everybody!
    Great example of how it SHOULD be. This is the difference between creating an opportunity both for yourself & for somebody "less fortunate" (even when they're NOT begging for help) vs. being taken advantage of. Unfortunately, there are plenty of so-called "outdoorsmen" around who take advantage, simply for their gain, of the real outdoorsman, who has put forth the time, money, boot leather, etc. to find land, pheasants, & learn how to hunt them.
    "Deader is better."

  4. #14
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    Dec 2013
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    South York Co.
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldenboy View Post
    I met a guy and his son once who were hunting the same private land we were hunting. My buddy and I were almost done shooting our limits and the day was still young! I asked them how they were doing since they did not have a dog. They said they hadn't seen or shot a bird yet that day. I invited them to join us and I helped the son shoot his first rooster! That was a highlight of the day for me. teaching him how to watch the dogs, how to get ready for the flush, how to identify the rooster from the hen, even practice on when to release the safety. I like to think I made a hunter out of that dad and his son that day. I probably also helped out fellow breeders when they saw the difference a dog makes in the field. I wasn't scammed yet I hunted with someone I did not know and it turned out great for everybody!


    Thatís so awesome you did that.

    My question to you is, how and when do you know to trust or not trust someone to hunt over your dog(s)?
    safety wise.

    Ive had two people at different times hunt with me and my labs in the past. One could NOT keep his finger off the trigger, I had to constantly remind him of that and to stop walking like Elmer Fudd with his gun in a shooting position.
    The other one shot his gun, the barrel was to my left 5í away from my ear while ground swatting a bird a few feet away from my dog.

    Those situations has unfortunately made me reluctant to hunt with new people. I now have one friend who I trust but, his kid just started hunting with us and I canít relax, I spend all my time watching the kid around my dogs like a hawk. Iím not sure how to get over that fear or Iím just a worry wort ?
    Last edited by padave; 06-15-2018 at 08:55 AM. Reason: Spellcheck

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by padave View Post
    My question to you is, how and when do you know to trust or not trust someone to hunt over your dog(s)?
    safety wise.
    For me, if I was to consider hunting w/ a complete stranger, I'd at least talk with him/her first for a while before making an invitation. You can learn a lot about what someone might be like in the field just by talking. You could direct the conversation such that it might "trick" them into divulging details about their experience, how they hunt, or thoughts on safety. But regardless of whether it's a stranger or friend you've never hunted with before, you can't be shy about letting them know before hunting that you're a stickler for safety & what your expectations are. Probably most easily digested by the prospective partner if you simply explain the guidelines you hold for yourself & that you'd appreciate it if they'd stick to them too. When it comes to safety, my dog is extremely important, but you can't run the risk of having someone forget that PERSONAL safety is even more important. It has to be. If you get into a hunt & don't feel safe, it's up to you to either fix the problem or call it quits for the day. I don't mind teaching safety to people who don't have a reason to know better. But people who should know better don't get a call-back.
    "Deader is better."

  6. #16
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    Dec 2013
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    South York Co.
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    Quote Originally Posted by A5 Sweet 16 View Post
    For me, if I was to consider hunting w/ a complete stranger, I'd at least talk with him/her first for a while before making an invitation. You can learn a lot about what someone might be like in the field just by talking. You could direct the conversation such that it might "trick" them into divulging details about their experience, how they hunt, or thoughts on safety. But regardless of whether it's a stranger or friend you've never hunted with before, you can't be shy about letting them know before hunting that you're a stickler for safety & what your expectations are. Probably most easily digested by the prospective partner if you simply explain the guidelines you hold for yourself & that you'd appreciate it if they'd stick to them too. When it comes to safety, my dog is extremely important, but you can't run the risk of having someone forget that PERSONAL safety is even more important. It has to be. If you get into a hunt & don't feel safe, it's up to you to either fix the problem or call it quits for the day. I don't mind teaching safety to people who don't have a reason to know better. But people who should know better don't get a call-back.

    Thanks, perfect advice.

  7. #17
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    Minnesota
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    I have had those horror stories as well. Times where people are not safe and are shooting a running birds. Typically I talk briefly with people before I start the hunt. (I do some guiding at local game farms so I am used to giving a brief safety talk) Then I watch and observe. If people are continually unsafe, I excuse myself and hunt somewhere else. They call me "me me" because I typically am the most driven guy out there to shoot and kill all the birds. But if you can take a step back at times and look at the situation through the kids eyes, crack open your gun, hang it on your shoulder, walk behind the new hunter and speak direction to them, then you are doing more than just bringing someone along with you. There is no greater experience for me that bringing my kid, or someone else's kid hunting and helping them succeed at shooting their first bird! The smile on their face, the picture that is sent home or put on social media, is a great reward for the time and effort. By the way sometimes the person I am helping to succeed is not a kid but a 70 year old who has a desire to hunt! Those are fun experiences as well.

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