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Thread: Question after first hunt

  1. #11
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    Nov 2016
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    St Paul , Mn
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    It would make sense in my mind that they give off less scent in order to protect a potential nest that a hen is sitting on from predators

  2. #12
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    Oct 2008
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    Central MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by A5 Sweet 16 View Post
    This is the first time I've heard this. Is this theory based solely on experience, or is there some scientific study (using pheasants; not dogs) to back it up? If experienced-based, I'm guessing the phenomenon is easier seen with dead birds thrown into cover, as opposed to healthy, live birds in cover who are allowed to do their thing???? My experience tells me that live, wild hens certainly have ENOUGH scent to arouse a dog who knows why he's out there. And I've never known my dogs to act more birdy with a rooster. Very curious.
    I certainly have no scientific proof it might be out there but I'm unaware of it. It's something we have noticed in training and testing. I sure can't explain it but I do believe it. And I agree with you, as my dogs have no problem finding hens in the wild as well.
    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  3. #13
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    Sep 2016
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    Richfield, MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBONESD View Post
    What were the conditions of your hunt? Were you hunting into the wind? Could just be there were poor scenting conditions that day
    It was cloudy with a wind of about 5-10 mph, we came across the birds from all directions as we hit different fields from different directions, some of them were directly into the wind, others were crosswinds.
    Greta - 1 year old Small Munsterlander

  4. #14

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    I have been to SD hunting wild pheasant for the past 20 years. What I have noticed is that my English Setters point very few birds compared to when we are at home on pen raised where they point almost 100% of the birds and I have to kick them in the ARS to get them to fly:-) I think wild pheasant don't hold as well (or at all) so the dogs are working with scent trails most of the time and unless that scent trail gets strong enough for them to want to go on point from 30 feet or more, you end up with a flushed bird. I've kind of accepted the fact that on wild pheasants I'm going to get many more flushes than points and I try to keep the dogs close.

  5. #15
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    Jul 2012
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    38degreesS
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    This is very interesting ... some days for us, the birds, particularly hens can be really 'sticky' ... other days, both cock birds and hens are very mobile ... I do believe that they are much more susceptible to the weather conditions than some people might think ... mind you, in my area, we are not subjected to the cold as much as you are over there!! I prefer to run my mature dogs on days like that ... they have much more experience and tend to have more 'control' of the birds ... or they have worked the birds out ... !! I do believe that experienced dogs certainly can ascertain the difference of scents between the hens and roosters ...
    Last edited by Tori; 12-18-2017 at 02:15 AM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Manhattan, KS
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    Don't worry, You have a young dog that hasn't been exposed to hunting wild birds.
    She likely had no idea that she was looking for birds. When training it is pretty clear to them that there are birds to be found.

    Keep taking her, the light will come on at some point.
    Have fun.
    Steve

  7. #17
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    Dec 2008
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    Weston, WI, near Wausau
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    Quote Originally Posted by SetterNut View Post
    Don't worry, You have a young dog that hasn't been exposed to hunting wild birds.
    She likely had no idea that she was looking for birds. When training it is pretty clear to them that there are birds to be found.

    Keep taking her, the light will come on at some point.
    Have fun.
    With increased exposure to live birds, the pup will eventually figure it out that the birds are what you're after. We train in a controlled environment, they start holding point as they should. Then we take them hunting and don't understand why they aren't pointing.

    I was taught to be patient and be very diligent about not shooting bumped, or birds the pup flushes. All of my setters have pointed and held birds while hunting at 6-7 months. But they flushed and bumped a lot of them, too.

    A couple dogs ago my pup had been worked in the training field with pigeons in a launcher, then live planted quail. She was pointing and holding consistently in the training field by the time our grouse and woodcock season opened. I started hunting her and the first hunts were frustrating. Then she started holding some of them and I was able to shoot a bird over a solid point once in a while.

    My youngest brother came with me then. I told him about not shooting anything she flushed and he agreed to follow the program. We hunted for 4 hours. The dog flushed bird after bird. Coming to the end of the last patch we were going to hunt she finally pointed and held tight on a woodcock, which I flushed and killed. Pretty frustrating morning, 4 hours, 20 bird contacts and only 1 solid point.

    Driving out and going by a young Aspen stand, which looked promising, I asked my brother if he minded trying one more spot. Both of our wives were expecting us, it would make us late, but with the frustrations of the morning I was willing to risk it. I send the dog out and within 20 yards she locks up tight. 20 minutes, or so later, we're counting our birds to see if we were at our limit. One short yet and "She's on point!". We filled out on 10 woodcock limit, only a couple shells left between the two of us. The light had gone on for that pup and she mopped them up with a fabulous performance. After that she still bumped the occasional bird, but she had it! I figure I shot 600-700 birds over her.

    In the cover we hunt it's impossible to hunt without a beeper collar. The collar is also a signal to the dog that it's time to go to work. Take him out for a hike, no collar, and he's a much different dog. Open the tailgate and pull out the collar and he goes nuts. He knows t's go time.

    So my advice is to get the young dog on as many wild birds as you can. But be diligent in only shooting those he points and holds. The light will go on at some point.
    Born to hunt. Forced to work.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
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    This is an interesting thread. I'm thankful that I WANT my dog to flush birds, commence chase immediately, & only stop pursuit if he doesn't see it fall after a couple seconds or if he has his quarry firmly between his teeth. Pointy dogs are awesome, but I can't get enough springer action.
    "Deader is better."

  9. #19
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    Jun 2010
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    Training with Mo......may be helpful.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    46

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    Back to the check cord.

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