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Thread: Late season pheasants - Full choke? Modified?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdshooter View Post
    Jonny,

    May I make a recommendation?

    Since your issue seems to be mainly your ability or inability to mount the gun quickly / efficiently, how about focusing on practicing your gun mount at home? You can even wear the same clothing you would when hunting. In the carry position you would normally use when hunting, practice mounting the gun to your shoulder whiLe focusing on an object across the room. Do this deliberately at first until you get muscle memory working then if need be increase the speed a little. I think you will find that if you do this every night for a couple weeks you will find it to help quite a bit. No need to be excessive maybe 20-25 times a night. Just remember to duplicate as best as possible your normal low gun ready position and step into the shot with your lead foot.

    Give it a try you may be surprised. I instruct some of my youth league members at our local Sporting Clays club to do the same.

    Oh and be sure you gun is UNLOADED....
    Birdshooter: thanks for the message. Have thought about doing this at he clays' range but will practice at home too. I know I don't step into the shot every time! Too focused on the mount and looking at the bird.

    I don't have issues at the clay's range, as I can pre-mount and usually shoot in the 34 to 38 range with an occasional 40. To date it hasn't been cold so we haven't been wearing heavy clothing; that's changed now...

    Often the mount is too quick/fast and I miss the spot on my shoulder and end up too low or high and the cheek isn't on the stock. If I step into the shot I may reduce this problem. Often I'm on uneven ground, on the side of a hill or other awkward positions, so it's difficult to get into the classic mount position.

    I do give the roosters a chance!

  2. #22
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    Yeah this is where the practice at home will develop muscle memory so you don't consciously have to think about it, it just happens naturally. Gun mounting exercises aren't the most exciting thing in the world to do that's why I said to keep the reps low but do it often. Besides, practice at home is cheap... I used to do it and now since I'm a Permit to carry holder, I even practice my pistol draw from concealment for the same reason.

    Here's another tidbit on the gun mount as it relates to Pheasant hunting. Unless the bird has flushed at the far reaches of gun range (in which case you may want to withhold shooting anyway) there's really no reason to hurry or rush the gun mount. Pheasant can fly fast but not faster than the shot out of your barrel. With practice you will be able to make a much more positive move, which will put the barrel on the bird with more consistency.

    Give it a try... you have nothing to lose and everything to gain.
    Last edited by birdshooter; 11-07-2017 at 12:48 PM.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by birdshooter View Post
    Yeah this is where the practice at home will develop muscle memory so you don't consciously have to think about it, it just happens naturally. Gun mounting exercises aren't the most exciting thing in the world to do that's why I said to keep the reps low but do it often. Besides, practice at home is cheap... I used to do it and now since I'm a Permit to carry holder, I even practice my pistol draw from concealment for the same reason.

    Here's another tidbit on the gun mount as it relates to Pheasant hunting. Unless the bird has flushed at the far reaches of gun range (in which case you may want to withhold shooting anyway) there's really no reason to hurry or rush the gun mount. Pheasant can fly fast but not faster than the shot out of your barrel. With practice you will be able to make a much more positive move, which will put the barrel on the bird with more consistency.

    Give it a try... you have nothing to lose and everything to gain.
    Thanks for the input...

    I have a pheasant mounted on the wall in a fly position. One I had stuffed (Iowa) many years ago. I could draw down on him, but he's a bit too close! Iowa - those were the day's; one license for the year, lot's of birds and no fees to pay. And road hunting was excellent, they didn't mow the ditches.

    Going to try the clay range next week without mounting...

    What part of Mn are you from?

  4. #24
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    Yep, Iowa back in the good ole days when they were king when it came to Ringneck harvest, Million plus every year....

    Hanover. couple miles south of St. Michael.

  5. #25
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    BShooter: A brief update...

    Have had a "practice" session with clothing and noticed my poor posture - not having a forward look/ foot forward position. When I move to the forward position, the gun comes to the shoulder easier. Also, I have sort of an appliance I wear that was made years ago. This fits into my shell vest shoulder pocket. Have not been wearing it lately, but am going to try it again. It's designed to keep the gun from slipping off my shoulder.

    Trying to plan a hunt for two day's starting Friday, in western MN. Hopefully I can get a good gun work out!

    Jon

  6. #26
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    Good to know Jon. Keep practicing at home till it feels comfortable and automatic. Practice all angles even completely turning around simulating a bird flushing behind ya.

  7. #27
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    Bird flush behind...my nephew had one of these in SD last week and he got completely turned around, forgot to move the feet and fell over!

    Jon

  8. #28
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    I use an O/U and like to take my time to see the bird well. I for years have used a modified in my lower barrel and full in the upper. Always use lower barrel first. This has worked well in field trials where we want a bit longer challenging retrieve. Also with wild birds they get going a bit faster than the pen raised birds that we use in trials so the mod/full works quite well for me and others that I know when in the field.

  9. #29
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    Interesting message - thanks!

  10. #30
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    This sounds like a clothing issue as much as it does a gun problem. I don't think anyone shoots well in a heavy coat, or with warm gloves. You might want to try some layering. I wear a light weight Orvis strap vest, over a gore-tex 'micros suede' shell, with either a fleece or goose down vest [both have high collars] for insulation. The vest allows for much better arm movement than an insulated coat. Finding the perfect gloves is a challenge. I have found that wearing a lighter one on my trigger hand, and a warmer one on the other can help. Good luck out there.

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