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Thread: Land owners...

  1. #1

    Default Land owners...

    If your at the local hardware store and canít find any no hunting signs thatís because Montana bought them all.

    Their down to using plywood and spray paint in some areas...

  2. #2

    Default

    Try getting permission to hunt in South Dakota for free.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    77

    Default

    There is apparently no shortage of folks who don't bother to ask for permission, and pay no attention to signs. A friend and I own two quarters of ground three hours from my home, and I can't count the number of times I've driven down there to hunt and found fresh tire tracks and empties laying around. My friend deer hunts out of a hay-bale blind there, and often watches five or six vehicles drive across our land during the three or four hours that he sits in the blind.

    It's a little frustrating to scrimp and save for a couple of decades in order to buy some ground, and then watch others help themselves to it.

  4. #4

    Default

    I can understand that. There are pros hers all over the place.They are sneaky, punks, and they are out there.Poachers are the lowest scum on the planet, and I turn them in all the time.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    387

    Default

    The Minnesota farmers I know are very upset about this buffer thing. I'm not up on it but I guess PF had some sway in the discussions.

    Many are saying no hunting when they have in the past.

  6. #6

    Default

    I was in western mn doing some duck hunting and the farmers are down right pissed with the new buffer law. Essentially they see it as losing farmable acres and still having to pay taxes on that land, which I understand. Governor Dayton is wanting to protect the water quality thus starting this buffer initiative which I too understand. It's probably more complicated than what I just described.... However, by draining the sloughs on their ground how many acres of new farmable ground have they gained?? That water has to go somewhere and now you see these big waterway ditches spread across the landscape which is now requiring the new buffer strips. The farmer I know was crying about losing 12 acres but his operation has tripled since I last saw him 10 years ago.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    882

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drake1 View Post
    I was in western mn doing some duck hunting and the farmers are down right pissed with the new buffer law. Essentially they see it as losing farmable acres and still having to pay taxes on that land, which I understand. Governor Dayton is wanting to protect the water quality thus starting this buffer initiative which I too understand. It's probably more complicated than what I just described.... However, by draining the sloughs on their ground how many acres of new farmable ground have they gained?? That water has to go somewhere and now you see these big waterway ditches spread across the landscape which is now requiring the new buffer strips. The farmer I know was crying about losing 12 acres but his operation has tripled since I last saw him 10 years ago.
    Excellent point. It'd be interesting to know, on average, the ratio of acres gained from drainage to acres lost to buffer strips.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    387

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Drake1 View Post
    The farmer I know was crying about losing 12 acres but his operation has tripled since I last saw him 10 years ago.

    I know, right ?

    Here that would only be $120,000, peanuts.

  9. #9

    Default

    That was his response as well and I understand your point. I'm guessing the 120 K is if you sold. How much has he gained by draining all wetlands? I'm guessing by have more acres in production his land value has increased by quite a lot. It's funny he wanted the government out of his business but yet cashes the subsidy checks.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    387

    Default

    I guess it was his to drain as he saw fit at the time.

    You're right however about the government money. Problem is he would put himself at a competive disadvantage if he refused the money.

    All in or all out would be my thinking.

    I'm thinking it was a rather heavy handed approach to the water quality problem. Many of those open ditches had the spoil placed on the banks, at least that's the case around here. Surface water does not run into them unless there is a culvert.

    The professionals in the field could have been tasked with the problem and found a solution on a case by case basis. Some cases would have required a buffer while others may have needed a different solution. Taking out standpipes would be my first recommendation.
    Last edited by McFarmer; 10-28-2017 at 07:19 PM.

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