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Thread: Retrieving issues

  1. #1

    Default Retrieving issues

    Hi all, just picked up Gus from the trainer yesterday after being there for 3 months. He is about ten months old right now. The trainer said that he did well great nose, quarters, responds to whistle commands, and retrieves. The only hiccup that I would like to work on with him involves the retrieving. I guess he has no problem finding the downed bird and bringing it back, but once he does come back you really have to grab the bird out of his mouth he doesn't seem to want to willingly drop it. Not sure if this is just a puppy faze or what. Would appreciate it if someone could give me some direction. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    My 6.5 yr. Golden still prances around/struts and doesn't want to give.

    A little electric reminder is usually all that's necessary. Your puppy may be too young for stimulation?

    Patience, he'll eventually drop or give it up, although it may take some time.

    Does he hold on to a training dummy? That's a good place to start and reward him often...
    Last edited by jonnyB; 04-07-2017 at 08:33 AM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Hi all, just picked up Gus from the trainer yesterday after being there for 3 months. He is about ten months old right now. The trainer said that he did well great nose, quarters, responds to whistle commands, and retrieves. The only hiccup that I would like to work on with him involves the retrieving. I guess he has no problem finding the downed bird and bringing it back, but once he does come back you really have to grab the bird out of his mouth he doesn't seem to want to willingly drop it. Not sure if this is just a puppy faze or what. Would appreciate it if someone could give me some direction. Thanks.
    I'd suggest talking to the trainer first not us internet clowns! I assume you spent some time with the trainer before taking him home. How did he act then? My guess is you are grabbing at the bird way to fast, slow down, calm down, relax, and pup will do the same.
    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  4. #4
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    first you should never allow him drop it, he should give the bird to you when you reach for it, if you allow him to drop it he'll drop a pheasant and the damn thing will try to run off lol

    now how to fix him

    have him sit holding the bird, you kneel next to him and gently grasp his collar with your left hand and just pet him no talk just quietly hold him, don't reach for the bird right away. After quietly petting him for about 45 second seconds or so reach for the bird command "give" if he doesn't give it to you just keep petting him (don't talk at all during this process the only command he will hear is "give")

    make him stay there for another minute a try again, command give, if he gives willingly praise and send him on, if he still holds the bird just keep petting and repeat in another minute or so

    eventually he will want to go more than he wants to sit there and hold the bird ( that's why your left hand is securing his collar)and learn he isn't going anywhere until he gives you the bird, once he learns that he will give you the bird on command
    Last edited by bobman; 04-06-2017 at 06:09 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobman View Post

    now how to fix him
    Yep, agree totally

  6. #6

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    Hang on people. First we don't have any idea as to what the training program was. Was the dog force fetched and collar fetched? Give us the run down of the specific training program and what the dog learned while at school!

    And as far as the dog being to young for collar stimulation, that is false. If the dog was indeed force fetched and collar fetched, then by all means, talk with the trainer on how you need to apply e-pressure.

    A good trainer also trains the owner when the dog is picked up! That is the only way to get your money's worth.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by westksbowhunter View Post

    A good trainer also trains the owner when the dog is picked up! That is the only way to get your money's worth.
    Bingo!

    Also the trainer knows this dog better than anyone including the OP. If there is a problem with his training (I doubt there is) give him a chance to fix it first. Heck who knows what he was even hired to do.

    I kind of feel like the trainer is being thrown under the bus even though he isn't named in the post......
    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

  8. #8
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    well you can use force and get it done or you can change the dogs mind with a little effort

    see when you force a dog to do anything he doesn't want to do he's always doing it because he's avoiding a reprimand. There's always going to be a need for repeating the lesson when he again decides he wants to do something you don't want him to do.

    now if you can use a little psychology to make him decide he actually thinks it's his decision and wants to give you the bird the problem goes away forever.

    Same thing works with little kids FWIW, if you want a child to pick up his toys or get ready for bed now you've given them a choice and empowered the child ( in his mind lol ) to make his decision and do what you want. Because they now think it's their idea.

    If you can make a dog believe in his mind that what you are wanting is what he also WANTS to do the resistance disappears forever.
    Last edited by bobman; 04-07-2017 at 06:27 AM.

  9. #9

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    Not throwing the trainer under the bus at all. I am very pleased with how my dog turned out. Not every dog is perfect, I just figured that this could be something that I work on. It's not even a huge issue, just something small that I figured could become a nuisance in the field. I'm going to try some yard work with dummy and lots of praise. See how that goes, thanks for the advice.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    Not throwing the trainer under the bus at all. I am very pleased with how my dog turned out. Not every dog is perfect, I just figured that this could be something that I work on. It's not even a huge issue, just something small that I figured could become a nuisance in the field. I'm going to try some yard work with dummy and lots of praise. See how that goes, thanks for the advice.
    I'll add another piece of advice. Small problems, or gaps in training do tend to manifest into bigger issues. Deal with it now before it becomes ingrained behavior. It's going to be easiest to fix today, harder tomorrow and so on. Trust me I've put on blinders and ignored what seemed like a minor issue and then worked my ass off to fix it later!
    Honestly I'd call the trainer, he knows the dog best and can give you the best advice on how to deal with it.
    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

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