Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30

Thread: Sit vs Sit/Stay

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A5 Sweet 16 View Post
    I think I know what you're getting at. Feasible?? I think sitting is almost always feasible. There are lots of times, though, that I just don't give a rip if he sits or not. Thus "stay". When I command "sit" it's not followed w/ "stay". As I said, "sit" means put your butt on the ground & stay put. Works for us.
    Awesome and makes sense to me! Wheels are turning...

    In regards to "feasible" I was seeing if you came up with/or had a situation/instance where the dog was not physically able to...ya never know and am always looking to learn

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    821

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorslife89 View Post
    Awesome and makes sense to me! Wheels are turning...

    In regards to "feasible" I was seeing if you came up with/or had a situation/instance where the dog was not physically able to...ya never know and am always looking to learn
    There are plenty of times when I think to sit would just be absurd, yet I need him to stay. Like if he's in water, muck, or 12" of powdery snow. I wouldn't want my butt in it, so why would I make him stick his in it? Especially when all I need is for him to stay?

    Most of the time, though, I just don't need him to sit. Some guys do & probably for some good reasons. When I taught my kids to "stay there", I didn't demand that they kneel every time.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Minnetonka/Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorslife89 View Post
    Question for you guys and gals. Would love to hear your opinion on this vs mine...

    Remi is doing great with all of the commands she has been shown so far:

    Come
    Sit
    Kennel
    Down
    Place
    Huntemup

    Now this leads me to the question: Do you add stay to your command list?

    I am following Tom Dokkens methods and he stresses this is very impt. I am NOT disagreeing with him of course but do I need to teach it? My line of thinking is sit means sit...until I say ok. Typically, I can walk a good distance away from her while just instilling sit command and reinforcing sit when/if needed as a reminder until l I give the come command. It is working for us pretty well.

    Am I hurting our training if I skip the stay command? I see lots of programs, lots of different ideas and opinions. Some are similar some are not. That leads me to believe why I feel skipping stay(shes only a little over 3 months so we could add if need be), would not hurt us. What do you think?
    I do use "stay" when he's pointing, or about to point. This is a Golden Ret. not a pointer, so it doesn't come naturally.

    We hunted a (preserve) on Monday and he pointed 8 times. Obviously, the birds are dumb and don't move until kicked.

    During my training (on going!) I have not been as strict with the sit, down commands - he does break on an occasion. If I'm really adamant about the dog staying put, I use sit and follow with stay.

    Not perfect, but it seems to work for us...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Thanks for the replies guys...

    Good points A-5 and jonnyB. This topic is really starting to influence me(for good reasons not just because I want or don't want to) on introducing "stay". Many good points made here.

    Any tips/tricks on introducing this command or just the typical giving a reward/praise after she listens/obeys the command? Of course, Ill go back to my book and dvd and see what Dokkens does. I didn't pay this much attn. at first because of what I was originally thinking(and we are not in a rush/race) but if you guys have any info towards this subject and retrievers that would be greatly appreciated.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Minnetonka/Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorslife89 View Post
    Thanks for the replies guys...

    Good points A-5 and jonnyB. This topic is really starting to influence me(for good reasons not just because I want or don't want to) on introducing "stay". Many good points made here.

    Any tips/tricks on introducing this command or just the typical giving a reward/praise after she listens/obeys the command? Of course, Ill go back to my book and dvd and see what Dokkens does. I didn't pay this much attn. at first because of what I was originally thinking(and we are not in a rush/race) but if you guys have any info towards this subject and retrievers that would be greatly appreciated.
    I've seen Dokken's dogs at the Sportshow - they do well and he has a thriving dog-training business. Have had one dog trained by him and two others trained by former Dokken trainers.

    My dogs were through the "puppy program" - intro to the gun and birds, not any obedience. I'm sure you won't go too far astray by following his training methods, he seems to get results.

    Most of the obedience stuff is employed around the home - sit, stay et al. The real test is when you are hunting and want obedience: come, whoa, other commands and hand signals.

    It's all in degrees: how much of a robot do you want? How important is it to have a super-obedient dog? And how much patience do you have?

    Good luck with your new puppy!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Minnetonka/Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A5 Sweet 16 View Post
    There are plenty of times when I think to sit would just be absurd, yet I need him to stay. Like if he's in water, muck, or 12" of powdery snow. I wouldn't want my butt in it, so why would I make him stick his in it? Especially when all I need is for him to stay?

    Most of the time, though, I just don't need him to sit. Some guys do & probably for some good reasons. When I taught my kids to "stay there", I didn't demand that they kneel every time.
    "didn't demand they kneel"...funny analogy!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Mukwonago, WI
    Posts
    557

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyB View Post
    Most of the obedience stuff is employed around the home - sit, stay et al. The real test is when you are hunting and want obedience: come, whoa, other commands and hand signals.

    It's all in degrees: how much of a robot do you want? How important is it to have a super-obedient dog? And how much patience do you have?

    I couldn't agree more! Lost my golden last may and am in the process of training another Golden now. Patience is so critical...and I find me reminding myself of that. All dogs are different. The one I have now is super high energy with a somewhat short attention span. Makes training challenging, but she is starting to come around.

    I use sit and stay commands. Her (my dog Storm) instinct is to follow me if I just tell her to sit next to me and I walk off. Telling her to stay allows me to leave her side and she stays put. I guess a guy could train that just the word sit means sit and stay...it's all in what works for you. Training a dog is as much about training the trainer as it is about training the dog.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Minnetonka/Minneapolis
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 519vx View Post
    I couldn't agree more! Lost my golden last may and am in the process of training another Golden now. Patience is so critical...and I find me reminding myself of that. All dogs are different. The one I have now is super high energy with a somewhat short attention span. Makes training challenging, but she is starting to come around.

    I use sit and stay commands. Her (my dog Storm) instinct is to follow me if I just tell her to sit next to me and I walk off. Telling her to stay allows me to leave her side and she stays put. I guess a guy could train that just the word sit means sit and stay...it's all in what works for you. Training a dog is as much about training the trainer as it is about training the dog.
    Finally got someone to agree...thanks! Just kidding a bit. Where did you find your dog? Wisconsin breeder? Curious...

    My Golden, at 6.5 tender years still is very plugged-in. We go through the same routine when he wants out: dog does cartwheels in anticipation, owner insists the dog sits and waits 20 seconds until I get my coat on.

    This never seems to change, even though we've gone through this routine many times. Trainer has failed, dog is stupid - maybe both are true!!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyB View Post
    "didn't demand they kneel"...funny analogy!
    I thought so too and that one hit home a little, lol!


    Well guys, I think Im going to use the stay command. The replies made perfect sense to me and we started on it last night. On the third try I was able to walk 7/8 yards away until I released her and she got rewarded. I also did it with her food and she waited/stayed, albeit with a few reminders just because of her excitement at that time. I will keep this in our training regimen moving forward.

    Thanks for ALL of the replies here, you were all a tremendous help!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Mukwonago, WI
    Posts
    557

    Default

    One more thought for you that's worked wonders for me...before you start the more "formal" training sessions, toss a ball or kong or whatever for 5 or 10 minutes for your pup. I do that with mine and it really makes a huge difference - it takes away a good portion of the extra energy that results in them bouncing all over and not concentrating. Once they are just a bit tired, then start your lesson. Try it...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •