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Thread: American Lab vs. English Lab

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by ranchodeluxe View Post
    My vet sees a lot of orthopedic issues on the large labs, even when they have all the guarantees, they don't age well. I don't hunt with Labs much, but there are simply hundreds of them in my area. There is always a half-dozen ads in the paper. I never go to the dog park without seeing several. The variation is stunning. I would stay away from the large-boned, oversize Labs, regardless of bloodlines, which I know nothing about.
    My 95 lb lab says otherwise! So does his big sire and grand sire. And his large dam!

  2. #12
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    That Double TT bitch is 52 lbs.

    The 11 year old next to her is about 78 right now but she has an injured left elbow that has seriously and permanently restricted her exercise/hunting. In full working trim she was about 72.

    The young UK bitch next to her is a bit large boned to my liking and she's running 74 right now but all muscle. I didn't expect her to be as big overall considering the size of her sire and dam.

    The black male is about the same size as the young yellow next to him overall; small for a male and he's at 75.

    The 12 year old chocolate is a small dog, pretty much the same size as the TT bitch. The chocolate weighs 54.

    Dysplasia is primarily genetics, not size. Unfortunately, I am coming around to the view that OFA is not necessarily the best test. I am kind of leaning towards PennHip as a more reliable indicator.

  3. #13
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    Northern Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chestle View Post
    Dysplasia is primarily genetics, not size. Unfortunately, I am coming around to the view that OFA is not necessarily the best test. I am kind of leaning towards PennHip as a more reliable indicator.
    100% agree!
    River - 2 yr old English Setter
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5
    Bella - 4 yr old Brittany
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5
    Ellie - 5 yr old Yellow Lab
    Jazi - 12/30/2005 -- 10/13/2017
    Kaci - 3/23/01 - -10/8/15

  4. #14
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    Nov 2015
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    20 miles south of Ft. Worth, Tx
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    I also like the fact that PennHip can be done long before the OFA 2 year mark. They say they can make a pretty reliable PH diagnosis at 16 weeks.

  5. #15
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    Nov 2013
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    Northern Michigan
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    I had penhip done on at 6 months as well as ofa. I had to do both per my health contract with the breeder. The vet said he felt the penhip was a better test in his opinion.
    River - 2 yr old English Setter
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5
    Bella - 4 yr old Brittany
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5
    Ellie - 5 yr old Yellow Lab
    Jazi - 12/30/2005 -- 10/13/2017
    Kaci - 3/23/01 - -10/8/15

  6. #16
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    Nov 2009
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    Jones County, SD
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    Quote Originally Posted by westksbowhunter View Post
    My 95 lb lab says otherwise! So does his big sire and grand sire. And his large dam!

    Your right, that's one thing you never see, a huge old lab, just barely limping along. I should start to video them, I see them daily.

    Like I mentioned before, I suspect that an 8 mile dirt bike run at 6k feet would expose they aren't in the kind of shape you think.
    Last edited by ranchodeluxe; 02-16-2017 at 10:50 PM.
    There's lots of things along the road, I'd surely like to see
    I'd like to lean into the wind and tell myself I'm free......Townes Van Zant

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miforester View Post
    I had penhip done on at 6 months as well as ofa. I had to do both per my health contract with the breeder. The vet said he felt the penhip was a better test in his opinion.

    My breeder doesn't even test hips, I don't even care about a piece of paper. what I care about, is that there is no history of serious genetic defects going back several generations. That's where I trust my breeder to do the right thing, choose her breeding stock wisely, then guarantee the overall health of the dog, which she does. If the genetics are chosen carefully, the dogs are not bred until mature, and by people who know what they are doing, the piece of paper is irrelevant.
    There's lots of things along the road, I'd surely like to see
    I'd like to lean into the wind and tell myself I'm free......Townes Van Zant

  8. #18
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    Aug 2015
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    Rancho mirage CA
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    Default Labs

    I have a British lab 65 lbs and is a great house pet and when we go hunting
    She has a great prey drive.My only problem when she was a pup was keeping her close.Now at 2.5 years old she is a great hunting companion.i could not ask for a better dog.i live in CA so wild bird hunting limited.i have hunted her each of last two years for 10 days in the Dakotas.For hunting wild birds only 10 days a year she is great, all that I can expect.
    I got her from know breeder of chocolates only and known for working dogs .
    I was more interested in 4 or five generations of no defects.Also got a limited
    AKA registeration, they don't want me to breed her.
    I love this dog

  9. #19
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    JamesO, if you don't mind sharing, what breeder is that?

  10. #20
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    Central MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by ranchodeluxe View Post
    My breeder doesn't even test hips, I don't even care about a piece of paper. what I care about, is that there is no history of serious genetic defects going back several generations. That's where I trust my breeder to do the right thing, choose her breeding stock wisely, then guarantee the overall health of the dog, which she does. If the genetics are chosen carefully, the dogs are not bred until mature, and by people who know what they are doing, the piece of paper is irrelevant.
    You have the right to buy dogs from any breeder you choose.
    However I find it irresponsible to promote buying from breeders that don't do recommended and widely accepted health testing. The only reason to skip testing is to save a couple bucks. It's not like the test is risky or painful...... it's a couple of x rays and $200ish. Many buyers are not going to research (or even know how to) the pedigree of a perspective pup.

    If a breeder doesn't test for the usual breed specific "problems". Run away fast as they are only in it to make a buck. I hate when money trumps improving the breed.

    Rancho go ahead a flame away at me. I stand behind my statement 100%

    Sorry for going off topic, I didn't want to hijack the thread but I couldn't let an irresponble statement go unchecked.

    Steve
    "We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It's the best deal man has ever made." M.Facklam

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