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Thread: Low area bushes recommendations

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    302

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    Look into Gray Dogwood.

    Try to stay native if you can. I would advise against honeysuckle. Nanking cherries around here don't last.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    INVER GROVE HEIGHTS,MN
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    1,473

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    Quote Originally Posted by sdviking View Post
    UGUIDE, will have to look into the honeysuckle, never planted them before. Russian Olives, don't they have thorns on them? Those trees do seem to draw pheasants. The cedars I planted with the intent of wind break, and winter cover on the west side of the dam. Two rows started but would like to add a third next Spring. I definitely want a row of bushes next to the lilacs that produces a berry if possible...

    Also hoping for cat tails along the banks but what do you think of alfalfa on the drier sides or just go with native grasses or tall Canary grass..... this area is intended to be a little 2 acre honey hole. sdviking

    Look into western wheat grass I think they call it anytime I see it I walk it its the only grass crp type grass I'm talking I'll will walk the dog in it always hold birds... Next also looking into what I call horse weeds/reeds or giant Cain grass. But Google "fragmites" u will see the stuff I'm talking grows next to & along cattails always birds in nobody wanna walk it similar to pompas grass...

    No thorns I'm aware of on Russian olives... The birds in ND loved them used them & eat the olives found lots in the birds crops...

    Adding some willows to your wet area along the cattails & fragmites would be insanly good late season hunting.. That's a common habitat set up in MN & SD willows cattails fragmites near corn with a wind break on prevailing wind side... Think they say 6+ row breaks are best read it some wear...

    Ur work is paying off... Dogwoods will also produce Berry's red osier something like that... Honey suckle awesome go for it birds love it... Cherry's taste good & the bushes stay after its a win win for you go for it man its your honey hole...

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Full time South Dakota now
    Posts
    178

    Default Honey Hole

    Thank you for the feedback and suggestions, much appreciated. The thick grass cover along with wind break protection next to water and food plot is exactly what I am hoping for. I think the set up has a good start with the borders being started this year along with the water holding area. Low/short trees that have something that attracts the birds is very desirable, so Russian olives may be in order, so will do some measuring and see if I can plant two rows of 3-6 Russian olives on the upper end of the dam (area where water runs down into the dam. Will post an updated photo that displays this soon.
    Leaning towards Honeysuckle or berry row next to the lilacs, or maybe I plant both rotating them every other one. I think when I said canary grass that it is the same as cane grass, about 6 foot tall and thick, loves wet soil. Researching "fragmites, now. I am really enjoying this project and appreciate the suggestions. SDviking

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    123

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    Perhaps the rhododendron might be to your liking, very hardy bush that has very nice flower colors, it will take the cold of any climate as it is found in the Himalaya Mountains of Nepal. They are very wide spread in the Smokey and Cumberland mountain ranges, and nothing much tougher than going through a patch of rhododendron bushes, should be great cover for game birds.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    1,143

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    Quote Originally Posted by odenney View Post
    Perhaps the rhododendron might be to your liking, very hardy bush that has very nice flower colors, it will take the cold of any climate as it is found in the Himalaya Mountains of Nepal. They are very wide spread in the Smokey and Cumberland mountain ranges, and nothing much tougher than going through a patch of rhododendron bushes, should be great cover for game birds.
    Native plum would be a good choice.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Madison County, Iowa
    Posts
    277

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    You could plant blueberry bushes, viburnum or try some red twigged dogwood. All should do well in your area.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Full time South Dakota now
    Posts
    178

    Default Fall dam pics

    Still trying to get caught up, but have habitat on the mind.
    Two pictures of the project this fall.
    24Aug and Sep16 about 3 foot of water in the pot hole.
    Was seeing quite of few Pheasants frequenting the water because the next closest water source is a mile a way.

    Removed a rock pile from the field next door, in early October and moved the rock to the project to hold clay in place on the dam. On the backside of the dam I broadcasted turnips that developed into a 20 x 40 foot patch. I also tried to put down some small grain seed along the exposed banks just for erosion control, but the seed didn't take hold.

    The dam area is now level with snow. Anyone cruising across this field will get a huge surprise when their truck disappears.

    A Third row of cedar trees are on order so that will make three rows of 25 on the west side.

    Two rows of bushes are on order for the east side to compliment the row of Lilacs. I don't remember what I ordered.

    SDviking
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  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Full time South Dakota now
    Posts
    178

    Default Spring 2017

    Getting excited about habitat planting time. Dam looks to be holding water well. Looks like the grass seed I put down last Fall washed away or just didn't take hold. Looking at broadcasting some reed canary grass along the banks in the very near future, since temps seem to be in the high 60s and lows are in the upper 30's. Last years lilacs and red cedars made it through the winter rather well. Two more rows of cedars will go in this Spring for a total of 4 rows on the west side and I hope to add a row of berry producing bushes next to the already established lilacs on the east side. Not sure what to plant on the dam side yet, maybe some kind of clover or alfalfa. Or maybe a pollinator mix. Love this time of year. Viking
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  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Full time South Dakota now
    Posts
    178

    Default Love it when Spring bush/tree planting is complete

    Well the conservation office tree/bush dry root order came in. Again this year the quality of their tree/bushes were great, at a cost of about $2 per plant.

    We planted a row of Juneberry on the east side of the dam next to last years planted Lilacs. We also planted two additional rows of red cedar trees next to the two rows we planted last year, on the west side. 70% of last years Cedars appear to be in good shape. 100% of last years Lilacs survived. We also planted a long row of Nanking Cherry north of the Caraganas (hedge plants)that we planted last year along a low drainage area. the Caraganas had a 100% survival rate.

    A single row of dwarft Alberta Spruce was also planted to fill in older trees. Two 6 foot apple trees and two 8 foot plum trees were also planted, this year I put T post next to them then wrapped a wire stockade panel around the fruit trees to protect them from the deer. Last but not least we planted five varieties of five each jam or berry producing shrubs.

    So on our 40 acres we are 75 percent done with tree/bush planting. We have a North to South short shelter belt that has died out over the years that needs lots of clean up then a plan on what to do. It's only an area of about 100 yards and 5 rows deep of dead trees. I'm thinking Cedar of evergreens to provide winter cover and block the wind and snow.

    Its disappointing seeing so many tree belts being removed or not restored. I hope others are having success establishing or maintaining their tree/bush projects.

    SDViking

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Full time South Dakota now
    Posts
    178

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    Well I told my self I wasn't going to plant a whole lot of bushes and trees in 2018. But with the nice extended Fall weather I was able to plow up a few areas to plant additional bushes. This will be the last year for planting along my dam. Lilacs will be three years old and all have survived, next row is Nanking Cherry which will be 2 yrs old and 90 percent made it so far. Then the dam, on the west side are 4 rows of red cedars of which 2 rows will be 2 years old and 2 rows will be three years old. The 3 year old ones are at 90 percent and 2 yr old ones are at 70%. Plan is to fill in new cedars to replace the ones that didn't make it. I would like to go snap some cattail heads off and scatter the heads along the dam to see if some of them will grow, if not looking at planting some canary grass on the area around the dam.

    By my low ground that runs through my 40 acres I have improved the ditch and hope to plant 20 feet of canary grass throughout the ditch to help with top soil control and give me better boundary cover. On the north side I have planted a row of Caragana hedge, and last year a row of native plum that did fantastic. This year I will plant 25 Nanny berry to extend the cover on the north side. I also plan on working on adding Choke Cherry and Cedars to an old 100 yard shelter belt that needs a lot of loving.

    On another piece of ground the plan is to add a row of dogwoods to the existing 2 rows of evergreens which run along 5 acres of canary grass and food plots.
    Plus our 13 acre prairie hay/foodplot we plan to plant a couple rows of honey suckle and juneberry along a slough bottom.

    I hope in the next couple of months to set up a tractor and make a light digger/disc to help keep the new tree rows black and reduce my work load. We also have an 60 gallon tank to water which we normally do for the first 2 years.

    Looking forward to Spring and improving this years habitat. Another 250 bushes/trees here we go. Sdviking

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