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Thread: New York reverses plan to shut down Reynolds Game Farm

  1. #1
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    Default New York reverses plan to shut down Reynolds Game Farm

    Good news in New York...

    ---------------------------------------------------------------

    New York reverses plan to shut down Reynolds Game Farm

    By Krisy Gashler • kgashler@gannett.com • January 17, 2009

    Reynolds Game Farm will stay open after all.

    Hunters and sportsmen filed a restraining order Thursday to prevent the DEC from destroying the pheasants at the Game Farm, a judge granted the order Friday and shortly afterward Gov. David Paterson reversed his position and agreed not to close the state's only pheasant game farm, said Tom King, president of the New York State Rifle and Pistol Association.

    The state Department of Environmental Conservation oversees the game farm. Calls to the DEC and to the game farm were not returned Friday.
    State Sen. George Winner, R-53rd, applauded the decision in a statement released late Friday.

    "I appreciate the willingness of the Paterson administration to recognize the value of this program to the Upstate New York culture and economy and to work with us to find an effective and creative way to keep the Reynolds Game Farm operating," Winner said. "I believe we will find an effective solution that will preserve the tradition and the economic benefit of New York's pheasant stocking program."

    King said he believes pressure from his organization, as well as the Conservation Alliance of New York, the National Rifle Association of America and the National Shooting Sports Foundation were critical in Paterson's decision.

    "The sportsmen in New York state are a pretty potent force," King said. "There's right around a million hunters in New York state and there are approximately 4.5 million gun owners in New York state. Pheasant hunting is near and dear to all of those who are hunters and shooters, and even though New York state does not have the best pheasant hunting in the world, it is near and dear. It's a tradition to many, many hunters."
    Not everyone was pleased with the news.

    Patrick Kwan, New York state Director of the Humane Society of the United States, said the practice of releasing pen-reared pheasants into the wild for hunting each year is "an abhorrent ritual."

    "It's despicable that even with New York state's budget crunch, the sport hunting lobby is still jockeying for tax dollars to restore one of the least deserving and most inhumane programs imaginable," Kwan said by e-mail. "With so many legitimate programs in New York state that are facing cuts, it's absolutely inexcusable for taxpayer money to be going towards what is essentially recreational killing and target practice using live animals."
    It costs roughly $750,000 per year to run the game farm, according to the DEC.

    In announcing his initial decision to close the game farm in mid-December, Paterson said the $12 billion state budget deficit required "focus(ing) our limited resources in this difficult crisis."

    "The closure of the Reynolds Game Farm presents us with one such opportunity," he said.

    King said the money paid by hunters for licenses and the federal Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration Act, argued in favor of keeping the game farm open.

    The Pittman-Robertson act allows the state and federal governments to collect a 12 percent excise tax on outdoor goods like rifles, ammunition and outdoor clothing, King said.

    The law requires that this money not be diverted to anything other than state fish and game departments, according to a summary of the law on the Michigan State University College of Law Web site.

    "We understand hard times, and we are not unreasonable people," King said. "However, we just want to be treated fairly and if we're paying for it, we want to know where the money goes and how much of it is going into the pheasant farm."

    If additional money is needed to operate the farm, hunters are willing to help raise funds, for example, through a pheasant stamp, King said.
    The game farm is the last of its kind. It has operated on Game Farm Road in the Town of Dryden since 1927.

    Yearly, the state disperses 60,000 day-old pheasant chicks, 15,000 7- to 10-week-old pheasants, and 25,000 adult pheasants so they can be raised and/or hunted.

  2. #2
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    Stopped em this time !!!

    This is what happens when we band together and stick up for our rites. Get ready for the next challenge cause you know it's coming under the guise of budget cuts.

  3. #3
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    Last I checked, all those programs are paid for by sportsmans licenses and outdoor product sales.

  4. #4
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    Glad to here it, wish they had a life so they would leave sportsmen alone. Maybe they want a war out of it. Lets all line up on oppisite sides and see who wins. Bet I know who.
    http://www.bluerivergundogs.com/Home_Page.html

    When you think you are smarter than your dog, ask your self who cleans up who's poo.

  5. #5

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    Patrick Kwan, New York state Director of the Humane Society of the United States, said the practice of releasing pen-reared pheasants into the wild for hunting each year is "an abhorrent ritual."

    Remember this quote from the original post, and dont think they wont back another governor who tries this:

    "It's despicable that even with New York state's budget crunch, the sport hunting lobby is still jockeying for tax dollars to restore one of the least deserving and most inhumane programs imaginable," Kwan said by e-mail. "With so many legitimate programs in New York state that are facing cuts, it's absolutely inexcusable for taxpayer money to be going towards what is essentially recreational killing and target practice using live animals."
    It costs roughly $750,000 per year to run the game farm, according to the DEC.

    In announcing his initial decision to close the game farm in mid-December, Paterson said the $12 billion state budget deficit required "focus(ing) our limited resources in this difficult crisis."

    "The closure of the Reynolds Game Farm presents us with one such opportunity," he said.


    The article was not entirely accurate or complete. Two organizations threatened to sue gov patterson and he backed down although tom king and the nysrpa and cany were involved the nra did not wiegh in to this why he credits them IDK....

    Join us, we are protecting pheasant stocking and making dove hunting legal:

  6. #6
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    Here you go New York. A small clip of the Reynolds game farm.

    https://youtu.be/ZNpRAaTyhrc

    Nick
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  7. #7
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    We all hear about budget cuts, such as social security is going broke, but we never here that welfare is going broke.

  8. #8

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    Not sure if that video is up to date, it indicates 33 acres of cover flight pens, and 20 acres of laying and breeding pens, although 33 acres is the size of a meduim size farm, I beleive the actual over flight pens are more than 33.

    Keep that in mind when some nimrod compares this to some private operation or club- this is basicaly 33 acres (or more) of cover - weeds, crops, its not like raising chickens as the narrative goes.

    As a matter of fact the entire anti pheasant narrative is false, we did a sereies of reports on this subject, you can read them all by following the inks off of part one, at this link:
    http://thebirdhuntingsociety.weebly....-stocking.html

  9. #9
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    Great link Mike. Thank you!

    I was looking at your photo/crop page. Would like me to document and photograph the crops of wild game birds that come into my shop? I won't have time to do such with all, but I can work on a few for you.

    Nick
    Last edited by 1pheas4; 10-12-2016 at 04:46 AM.
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

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