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Thread: Pointer vrs Flusher Article in Shooting Sportsman

  1. #21
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    My thing is. A flusher is in front of you at 15-20-30 yards correct? Or the guys I hunt with, thats what there labs and spaniels do. And they work hard dont get me wrong but arent they just going to flush up the birds that you yourself are gonna walk over anyway? I want a dog that finds birds that Im not gonna kick up myself. As sparse as birds are in some areas having the range dog go point birds in a draw I dont plan on walking through lets me cover alot more area. Especially when hunting public. I dont use gps collars. I do use the vibration button on the ecollar to range the dog back in when we start getting into pheasants. And as far as running birds go. Mine will brake point and relocate. Chasing the running birds can be a bad thing too. When do I want a flusher? On a super hot day where scenting conditions are crappy. Then I want something that runs back and forth in front of where Im walking. Just to throw a comparison out there when my buddy put the gps collar on his lab and one on my setter. The setter did 42 miles. The lab did 19. In 7 hours of hunting. The boykin did 22 miles. Both dogs have their place. My preference is pointers. If you have both, then you have the best of both worlds. I have a setter now and two vizslas. My next move will probably be an English Springer Spaniel with the setter combo. See how that works.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PheasantWhisperer View Post
    My thing is. A flusher is in front of you at 15-20-30 yards correct? Or the guys I hunt with, thats what there labs and spaniels do. And they work hard dont get me wrong but arent they just going to flush up the birds that you yourself are gonna walk over anyway? I want a dog that finds birds that Im not gonna kick up myself. As sparse as birds are in some areas having the range dog go point birds in a draw I dont plan on walking through lets me cover alot more area. Especially when hunting public. I dont use gps collars. I do use the vibration button on the ecollar to range the dog back in when we start getting into pheasants. And as far as running birds go. Mine will brake point and relocate. Chasing the running birds can be a bad thing too. When do I want a flusher? On a super hot day where scenting conditions are crappy. Then I want something that runs back and forth in front of where Im walking. Just to throw a comparison out there when my buddy put the gps collar on his lab and one on my setter. The setter did 42 miles. The lab did 19. In 7 hours of hunting. The boykin did 22 miles. Both dogs have their place. My preference is pointers. If you have both, then you have the best of both worlds. I have a setter now and two vizslas. My next move will probably be an English Springer Spaniel with the setter combo. See how that works.
    No pheasants run that's why people use blockers. 25 miles seems about right. You really should get with somebody that has a little high powered lab I'm sure they will do 40. As far as you being able to cover more ground. Personally I think it's a wash. Walking 2 or 300 yards out of your way to a pointer who is more than likely holding a hen or a bird that's relocated. I can't do that. Flushers put up a high ratio of roosters to hens. I think you want a flusher when you are hunting a small group of people any cover (pheasant) except for crops.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownDogsCan2 View Post
    No pheasants run that's why people use blockers. 25 miles seems about right. You really should get with somebody that has a little high powered lab I'm sure they will do 40. As far as you being able to cover more ground. Personally I think it's a wash. Walking 2 or 300 yards out of your way to a pointer who is more than likely holding a hen or a bird that's relocated. I can't do that. Flushers put up a high ratio of roosters to hens. I think you want a flusher when you are hunting a small group of people any cover (pheasant) except for crops.
    So flushers know the difference in a hen and a rooster? That's impressive! Didnt know that. Guess my dogs have more work to do.
    Last edited by PheasantWhisperer; 04-15-2016 at 11:35 AM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownDogsCan2 View Post
    Flushers put up a high ratio of roosters to hens. I think you want a flusher when you are hunting a small group of people any cover (pheasant) except for crops.
    I can't wait to hear the responses to this statement. Where do you get your information? This is almost like sometime back when someone on this site said his dog you tell the difference between hens and roosters. I would gladly invite you to hunt behind my Brittany in a small group. You just might come away with a different opinion.
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  5. #25
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    Seriously how many times do you walk up to a pointed rooster not on the perfect day on average. And how many birds did you see , not counting the ones your dog blew through. I'm not picking a fight here I'm stating my opinion same as you.

  6. #26
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    No that wasn't directed at you zeb.

  7. #27
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    Default GPS = no lost gundog!

    If you have ever lost a dog for period of time, you will not disavow a GPS. In today's hunting with either vast fields of overgrown CRP, or the converse, small hunting habitats bordered by dog dangerous roadways, or locations, or a system for which I am familiar with, low density of game birds, require a really big running dog to handle the size and scope of the ground, reminiscing the by gone horseback days with scouts to locate the pointing dog. The GPS is a scout, find the dog AND safely return it home, giving everyone piece of mind. By the way, I personally have a different philosophy about GPS rather a hawk scream-audio tone collar, or a correcting collar, but a subject for another time.

  8. #28
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    Stating your opinion is one thing and that's what its all about. But a dog that can tell the difference in a hen and rooster is a pretty ridiculous statement. And myself and my daughter killed about half of our roosters off points this year. And walking to a dog on point and flushing a bird is never a wash. That's why I go. Because of the dog.

  9. #29
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    Nobody said they could tell the diffence. jeas. pheasants are runners especially roosters. if a dog can put them up or pin them or point them before they are half across the field or on the neighbors property you will see more. done finished back to work.

  10. #30
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    Dog is not always going to be downwind from the bird. You cannot fault a dog if the wind is wrong at that particular cast and the bird hears/sees the dog and flushes.

    If the pheasant doesn't flush, the dog will probably cut its trail the next cast.

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