Results 1 to 10 of 54

Thread: 12 versus 20

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1

    Default 12 versus 20

    I thought I posted this question earlier today but I guess I did not hit the submit button. I will try again.

    I want a 20 gauge for doves and would like to also use it on pheasant. I carried a 7.5 pound 12 gauge this year and it was fine but I certainly noticed the weight a lot more than I did when I was younger.

    If I shot a 20 gauge with 1 1/4 ounce of #5 shot wouldn't that basically be the same as a 1 1/4 ounce #5 load out of a 12? I'd have to shoot 3 inch shells in a 20 to shoot 1 1/4 ounce loads but since it's not high volume shooting I think that would be ok. On the other hand I could probably find some one ounce loads that pattern well and use those too.

    For those of you that shoot a 20 do you feel handicapped by the smaller gauge?

    Thanks,

    Dan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Janesville Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,007

    Default

    A 20 gauge with 3 inch shells gives up nothing to a 2 3/4 inch 12 gauge as far as range in the field in my opinion.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    rural Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,350

    Default

    In fact, as a practical matter, I've completely gone back to 2 3/4" shells in my 20 and 12.

    If I were a goose, turkey, or blind-based duck hunter, I'd probably keep some 3 inchers around.

    Other folks may have different, and better, opinions.

    Best wishes.
    Kis
    For hunters, Fall is the island towards which we swim all year.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kismet View Post
    In fact, as a practical matter, I've completely gone back to 2 3/4" shells in my 20 and 12.

    If I were a goose, turkey, or blind-based duck hunter, I'd probably keep some 3 inchers around.

    Other folks may have different, and better, opinions.

    Best wishes.
    fully agree i do you the 3"late in season

  5. #5

    Default

    I don't see a downside; I can carry a much lighter gun and should have pretty much the same killing power.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    South Dakota / Arizona
    Posts
    6,127

    Default

    While a standard 12 gauge load of 1 1/4 oz. has a velocity of of 1,330 fps the 20 ga. 3" Mag. with 1 1/4 oz. is 1,300. So in those terms they are quite comparable. I think where the 3" 20 ga. suffer most is in patterning. With it's long shot string the 3" 20 ga. loads generally do not throw the best patterns. Thus, the 12 ga. would probably do a better job. There are light weight 12's out there. Or maybe even a 16 ga. with 1 1/8 oz. loads at around 1,300 fps would throw more pellets in the killing zone than the 3" 20 ga.
    Janee's August Breeze - Bree
    7/6/2016
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5

    Godfather's Dakota Elle - Elle
    1X NSTRA Champion
    11/16/2008 - 11/22/2016
    http://gundogcentral.com/view_pedigr...&generations=5

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by slidellkid View Post
    If I shot a 20 gauge with 1 1/4 ounce of #5 shot wouldn't that basically be the same as a 1 1/4 ounce #5 load out of a 12? I'd have to shoot 3 inch shells in a 20 to shoot 1 1/4 ounce loads but since it's not high volume shooting I think that would be ok. On the other hand I could probably find some one ounce loads that pattern well and use those too.
    Slide -- Out to about the 40 yard mark, you will give up very little with the 20ga if you use the appropriate loads/chokes. So, keep your shots reasonable (out to ~40 yards max) and use the right load, pellet size and choke, and you won't have have any trouble killin' pheasants with a 20ga.

    Of course, you'll need to pattern your loads and chokes at the distance you plan on using them to make sure they can maintain good pheasant killing pattern densities. But, loads from 1- to 1 1/8-ounce with lead No. 6s or 5s will handle most pheasant shooting at reasonable ranges if you choked them properly. A good starting point for a choke combo in a double-barreled 20ga gun would be would SK/IM.

    Here are some of my pattern numbers from a 20-gauge Browning Citori with 28" Invector-plus barrels and Briley flush chokes that I've killed pheasants with to give you an idea of what you might find (patterns average of five, 30" post-shot scribed circle, yardage taped muzzle to target, and in-shell pellet count average of five).

    20 GA 2 3/4" RELOAD
    1 oz #6 lead (233 pellets) 1,200 fps
    30 YARDS -- SK / pattern 147 (63%)
    40 YARDS -- IM / pattern 163 (70%)

    20 GA 2 3/4" REM PHEASANT LOAD
    1 oz #5 lead (177 pellets) 1,220 fps
    30 YARDS -- SK / pattern 104 (59%)
    40 YARDS -- IM / pattern 109 (62%)

    20 GA 3" RELOAD
    1 1/8 oz #5 lead (190 pellets) 1,200 fps
    30 YARDS -- SK / pattern 127 (67%)
    40 YARDS -- IM / pattern 122 (64%)

    I mostly shoot my reloads above but I've killed several with the factory load listed.

    Of course, if you can't put the pattern on the front end of the pheasant then little else matters!!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    493

    Default 12vs20

    Hunted with 12ga, 16ga, and 20ga out in SD. All of them worked really well. I also found out that I can miss equally well with all three. Liked the 12ga a little better with steel, but also liked the 20ga with Federal Heavy Weight 7s in the 1 1/8 oz load. They get a little expensive, though. My new 12ga is only 2oz heavier than the 20ga that I hunted with last year at 6 3/4 lbs. I have a 16ga on order that weighs 5 3/4 lbs. If it ever comes that will be interesting to shoot.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •