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Thread: Wolf inpact

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnaj_springer View Post
    Not sure what your point is?
    My Point : The anti/conservation groups don't want IDFG to manage wolfs scientifically as this article clearly shows. In my opinion there unstated goal is to kill off hunting/guns!
    Last edited by wesslpointer; 01-23-2016 at 09:32 AM.

  2. #12
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    Since they moved the wolves in to Yellowstone park, They should move them to Central Park, Grant Park or Golden Gate Park. They would do more good there and they were once native there.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by haymaker View Post
    So I guess we need to find a way that Elk can hunt wolves, then the wolves might be wary of elk.
    Is this an attempt of satire?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wesslpointer View Post
    My Point : The anti/conservation groups don't want IDFG to manage wolfs scientifically as this article clearly shows. In my opinion there unstated goal is to kill off hunting/guns!
    By eliminating a game species? That's quite the long con.

  5. #15
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    No, the "con" was introducing a larger species of wolf that was never found in the lower 48 & then failing miserably to account for & control the mistake in a timely manner. Now formerly healthy & flourishing stocks of indigenous ungulate species such as elk, moose, & deer are paying the price in addition to ranchers & folks who live in rural areas. The so-called "reintroduction" was an experiment gone terribly wrong & that and that alone created the "imbalance" that now exists. Therein lies the sole "causation."
    Last edited by koja48; 01-23-2016 at 10:53 AM.
    Dogs . . . I've loved them all . . . the good, the bad, the mediocre, the spectacular. God never made a more loyal & trusting creature than a dog. No small wonder that the same three letters spell two words very important to me . . .

  6. #16
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    There's no doubt that the wolves have affected the populations of the animals they prey on. But to name only one factor (any one factor) as the sole cause is erroneous and lazy. Any Eco-system is complex, and each variable interacts with the other variables. Do the wolves need to be managed as well? Yes, absolutely. But are they the only reason for the elk population decline? Definitely not.

    But in our reactive society, we'd prefer one thing to blame after the fact, rather than recognize all of the factors and make informed, reasonable conclusions, and the appropriate actions that ought to follow.

  7. #17
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    Since "root cause" is defined as: "The fundamental reason for the occurrence of a problem," and such significant depredation/kill-off of elk & moose in places where the new wolves have become established following "reintroduction," that certainly appears to be a significant causal factor. While disease, hard winters, wild fires, loss of habitat, etc. can cause population fluctuations, it has only been since the advent of the populations of larger wolves that such has reached the monumental proportions realized today, but the introduction of a much larger & fiercer wolf species foreign to the northwestern US IS the root cause. Failure to control the wolf population early-on certainly was a contributing factor. Shortly after wolves became problematic in Montana, I found 2 fresh wolf kills (cow & calf). When I reported it to a state biologist, he was reluctant to believe me, saying: "How do you know it was a wolf?' "Because there were tracks & 4 wolves were standing in them." He still didn't believe it was a wolf kill. Had Canadian wolves NOT been introduced uncontrolled initially into the Northwest, we wouldn't be having this conversation would we . . .
    Dogs . . . I've loved them all . . . the good, the bad, the mediocre, the spectacular. God never made a more loyal & trusting creature than a dog. No small wonder that the same three letters spell two words very important to me . . .

  8. #18
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    You're right about what a "root cause" is defined as, but then the debate becomes, are wolves the "fundamental reason" for the decline. I'm saying I need to see more evidence (scientific, not anecdotal) before believing that. And then we need to ask, is the decline truly a bad thing for the eco-system (I could care less if it affects elk hunters).

    But honestly, humans have had a much larger negative impact on wildlife than any other animal.

  9. #19
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    http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/outdo...-latest-count/

    It also looks as if the population has rebounded some. Maybe both the populations are leveling off into sustainable numbers?

  10. #20
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    We will just have to agree to disagree. I bid you well.
    Dogs . . . I've loved them all . . . the good, the bad, the mediocre, the spectacular. God never made a more loyal & trusting creature than a dog. No small wonder that the same three letters spell two words very important to me . . .

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