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Thread: Ohio Division Of Wildlife Pheasant Hunt Survey

  1. #1
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    Aug 2010
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    Default Ohio Division Of Wildlife Pheasant Hunt Survey

    Who all filled out pheasant hunting survey reports for days hunting pheasants in Ohio and what were your results and / or recommendations if any?

    I filled out 3 reports for 3 days of hunting stocked birds on public land in NE Oh..
    3 days hunting , about 2.5 hrs. each time out - 1 bird flushed and shot each of two first hunts, 0 birds flushed 3rd hunt. I quit hunting pheasant in Oh. after that as I felt I was essentially wasting my time since my averages for hunting in Pa. far exceeds that of Oh.. Pheasant hunting in NE Oh. is pretty depressing really.

    My recommendation to the ODOW for the one thing that could be done to improve pheasant hunting on public land in Oh. is to emulate Pa.'s pheasant stocking and public hunting area habitat management programs. Any crops planted on public land in Pa. must leave at least 20% of the crops standing throughout the hunting season. In Oh. they all get cut down to pretty much bare earth.


    I grew up hunting wild pheasants in NE Oh. .. very very sad what the State has allowed to happen here. Some people wonder why the interest in sport hunting is in decline. I don't think it's too hard to figure out.

    Incidentally Pa. stocked more than 200,000 birds this fall throughout the state...Ohio stocked 15,000...

    If it wasn't for deer and waterfowl hunting I probably would quit buying an Ohio hunting license.


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    Last edited by huntsem; 12-30-2014 at 08:07 PM.

  2. #2
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    Mar 2011
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    It's sad to see Ohio in this kind of shape as far as upland hunting goes. Growing up I always thought of Ohio as a decent pheasant/quail destination.

    The pheasant stocking program is very expensive. Do you guys think there are enough upland hunters left in the state to support a Pheasant Stamp that would help to offset the costs?

    How did your wild quail trap-n-transfer program go? If I remember correctly it had some early success.

  3. #3

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    I too filled out the survey cards and also put on there as a suggestion to look at PA as a model for future upland game management Maybe if enough of us suggest that someone will take notice.

  4. #4
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    Aug 2010
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    N.E. Ohio
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    I haven't heard much about the quail release project in NE Ohio.
    I asked about it a year or two ago and was told the quail released in Columbiana County moved into the surrounding properties. We had a couple of bad winters with extended snow cover at the end of the project and that didn't look good IMO. I also think it was a bad idea to conduct the release project in a public hunting area as the quail would be likely to be pressured and coveys broken up late in the season as small game and rabbit hunters and dogs hit the area throughout the hunting season.

    The DOW pheasant hunting online survey asked about opinions regarding a pheasant stamp and fees. I would gladly pay for a stamp if the DOW did a better job with upland habitat management and increased stocking numbers.

  5. #5

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    It would seem to me that ohio needs to create stamps to pay for all the non-hunting expenses that our lincenses are paying for now. I'm not opposed to a stamp,but the money would just get watered down into other things.

  6. #6
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    NJ was faced with the same problem years ago. They weren't sure enough hunters would support a Pheasant Stamp and worried the whole pheasant stocking plan would cease to exist. Well they now charge 40 dollars for a Pheasant/Quail stamp and stock over 50,000 pheasant and 10,000 quail. In short it worked. In Pa. it looks like the Pheasant Management Plan is having the desired results, in that pheasant hunter numbers are increasing.

  7. #7
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    I've heard that in Ohio funds from hunting and fishing license fees and other state income resources like fees from extractive industries (oil, gas, timber, mining) go into a general fund in the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Supposedly these funds are divided up to include categories not directly related to hunting and fishing activities. Things like camp grounds, state parks, state resorts, etc., also receive a share of these funds. I'm not certain of all of this but it wouldn't surprise me. I've heard that in Pa. such funding resources mostly go directly to the Game Commission. The interest in sport hunting as a percentage of the population has been in a steady decline for quite a number of years and more so in Ohio than in Pa.. so for the state of Ohio to shift allot of funds to non hunting activities makes some sense. IMO the major influences for declines of wildlife populations in Ohio, especially upland game birds, are powerful influences from industrial agriculture. In a sense those industries operate against the better interests of wildlife, especially upland birds. It's not a stretch to see where the intersts of upland hunters could be viewed as problematic in states like Ohio that heavily supports the agriculture industry. I think that hunters in Ohio should have a better understanding of exactly where all of the funds from a pheasant stamp would go before they buy into it. If a $40 pheasant stamp would significantly improve the upland wildlife habitat and hunting in Ohio I'd gladly pay the fee.

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    Last edited by huntsem; 01-01-2015 at 06:13 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
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    I'm also in agreement about a pheasant stamp: the major problem I have is this. Since the state sets the release dates well in advamce, you get an overwhelming amount if hunters out only on those release dates. If you go out the afternoon following this madness, not only are you hunting a significantly reduced population of birds, you're also likely hunting one that has been crippled. If the DOW were to spread out the releases, to better spread out the herds of people coming out, I think the hunts would be more enjoyable. I don't feel comfortable taking my dog out until after all the first hour shooting is over, and trying to hunt anytime after ten the thanksgiving release is almost a waste: we went out for four hours yesterday and 6 today and didn't see a thing, except for three pheasant carcasses, likely from crippled birds at the last release.

  9. #9
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    Me too. I don't go out early on the release days for similar reasons. It sure does suck to take a good bird dog out and hunt for hours and hours and miles and miles and find that you are lucky if can flush a single bird. Right now I think some wildlife area managers just do whatever is quickest and easiest.

    Someone who lived near Grand River wildlife area once told me that he's seen the birds released along roads without much regard to whether they flew into the public hunting area, roadside ditches or adjacent private lands that are closed to hunting. In years past I shot most birds in that area on adjoining private land where birds were forced but which is now posted as no hunting. More should be done about this such as; making more efforts to get nearby landowners to allow hunting with permission, develop the deeper interior portions of the wildlife areas to provide better food sources and cover so most of the birds are released and tend to gather further from the outside boundaries. If food plots are left standing deeper within the wildlife area throughout the season birds will tend to gather there. When there is standing corn, beans and good bird friendly cover right across the street from a public area that's been pounded hard or has crop fields cut down to nothing it's not hard to figure out where a good portion of the birds will tend to hang out.
    Last edited by huntsem; 01-01-2015 at 06:15 PM.

  10. #10

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    you know,they used to give pheasant chicks to any farmer who wanted to participate. The farmer fed and released the birds on their farm. With all the crp ground that is available,this would help with populations and save the state money per bird. More birds,more license money,more bird money, etc.... I know a lot of people, self included, who won't get near the state public hunting areas. There are not alot of birds in Madison Co. So I do little hunting here. I do mostly preserve hunting. It's a bit costly,but I'm not hurting the wild population. I really enjoy bird hunting, I think it is worth the extra money. I would be willing to pay for a stamp, IF, the money was used properly.
    Last edited by mdeadpair; 01-01-2015 at 06:26 PM.

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