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Thread: back from the south!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Northern Alberta
    Posts
    185

    Default back from the south!

    Well, we got back on Monday from our annual whirlwind upland tour, and it was as great as alwayss!
    We shot Sharptails, chukars, and of course a possession limit of roosters as well as a few released fbirds from a friend's pheasant farm.
    5 days of hard driving dogs, lots of miles, and dirty guns at the end of the day.
    Compared to last year's snowy cold weather however, this year was gorgeous, no jackets in the afternoons, mid 'teens Celsius, and enough wind to make things challenging!
    This marks my 50th year of pheasant hunting and it was my son's 25th birthday on this hunt, so we celebrated afterwards with a stogie as well- the last one I had before this year was when he was born.


    Two taken with the the muzzle loader that was willed to my boy from my father- it's a mid 1800's Chance and Sons 14 gauge that he shoots once a year on this hunt then hangs up again untill next year- I took two with it as well.

    The Westly Richards hammer double was as deadly as ever on roosters this year!

    My hunting partner also shoots vintage SXS guns, but my son sticks to his trusty open choked 28 gauge!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    rural Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,343

    Default

    You've got some marvelous traditions in your family, congratulations...they are a treasure, unique to you; rare and precious.

    Sounds like a wonderful hunting trip, and some great variety. Did you use guides or are you that familiar with the areas you hunted?

    Nice images, great trip.

    Thank you.
    Kis
    For hunters, Fall is the island towards which we swim all year.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Northern Alberta
    Posts
    185

    Default

    Thanks Kismet!
    Yes, my family is big on passing stuff down, for sure - my hunting knife was given to me in 1992 by my father when I got my first bighorn sheep draw, he brought it back from Germany in 1966, but never used it.
    I have carried it on every hunt since then!
    The Chance and Sons 14 gauge that my son now owns, was given to my father for Father's day in 1967, which was Canada's 100th year of Confederation.
    Some of the land we hunt is public land, and some private where a few friends have permission to hunt on.
    I have never used a paid guide , but certainly have had friends take me out for a day.
    One day I will make a big trip down south to the Dakotas or Montana to hunt birds however, and that may require a guide then.
    DHT
    Last edited by davidtodd; 10-31-2014 at 11:36 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    central california
    Posts
    4,579

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    Very nice! Looks like a great trip and some lasting memories to me, thanks for sharing details and pics with us all.
    "The happiest man is he who learns from nature the lesson of worship"

    -Ralph Waldo Emerson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Northern Alberta
    Posts
    185

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by quail hound View Post
    Very nice! Looks like a great trip and some lasting memories to me, thanks for sharing details and pics with us all.
    Every year is different, although we hunt the same places.
    One of my very good friends that I have hunted with for the last 15 years could not make it this year, and it saddened both of us.
    My buddy Steve hunted with us last year, and met up with us down south .
    he knows me from work. I asked Brian if it was okay if a friend hunted with us that day and he said "sure"!
    It turns out when he and Brian ( my absent friend) met, it was like old home week - they worked together 20 years ago!!
    Brian has a very goofy Griffon, and the two of them together keep a crew in stitches, for sure.
    This is Brian and myself years ago with Tramp
    That's my 28 gauge Mini Bobwhite in the pic.
    Last edited by davidtodd; 11-01-2014 at 12:02 AM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    MN-MT
    Posts
    3,572

    Default

    David, you guys sure know how to go about a bird hunting adventure.
    Thanks for sharing and the pics.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Northern Alberta
    Posts
    185

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    Quote Originally Posted by mnmthunting View Post
    David, you guys sure know how to go about a bird hunting adventure.
    Thanks for sharing and the pics.
    You are quite welcome!
    Some years, if the timing is right, we start off on a friends farm hunting geese and ducks as well, but this year didn't work out with the days and weekends.
    Hopefully next year!
    One year we were hunting pheasants in the morning and shooting geese and duck ducks in the afternoon!
    DHT

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    13

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    Hello David,
    I was talking with another southern Pheasant hunter this week and he was telling me that the birds that are being released this year were up from the states. It seems that they were bigger, hardier and tougher to hunt. It was a definate challenge for the dogs. They figure there could be more carry over for next year.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Northern Alberta
    Posts
    185

    Default

    Yes, the Canadian Pheasant company ( the outfit that used to supply Alberta) is now defunct, and for the last two years the bigrds have come from the States - Wisconsin IIRC.
    They are BIG, fast flyers and will run as well. Pretty much act as pheasants!!

    The dogs have to be on their game and so do the hunters to get these birds, but at the same time, I don't see much difference except for the size.
    We had them sit as tight as the Canadian birds as well.
    Many hunters complain about the release sites saying it is not sporting ,etc and the birds are tame, but I have this to say.

    Just how long does it take for a released bird from a farm to become "wild"? Not too long in my experience!!
    We have hunted release sites days after no releases were made and still put up birds, so they don't " all get shot" as soon as they are released, either.

    Whatever the case, wild , released, or game farm, birds are noting but a pile of fun!!
    David

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Northern Alberta
    Posts
    185

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doggind View Post
    Hello David,
    I was talking with another southern Pheasant hunter this week and he was telling me that the birds that are being released this year were up from the states. It seems that they were bigger, hardier and tougher to hunt. It was a definate challenge for the dogs. They figure there could be more carry over for next year.
    The biggest issue with carry over in Alberta iss the lack of habitiat, simple as that!
    The ranches I hunt that have good cover and water hold birds, lots of them.
    The areas that don't, well there are very few birds now compared to when the same areas were not cleared out, drained, and logged off or cultivated "ditch to ditch"
    We did a push one day on a friend's farm in a corn field that had gotten mealy worms and he did not harvest it- no roosters, but we did put up three hens which is promising!
    On a release ground permit we can shoot the hens, but he normally doesn't put any out except for seed, he raises lots of roosters however.
    is is not a business, he does it as a hobby.
    David

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