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Thread: Crop Report....What does it tell you?

  1. #1
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    Default Crop Report....What does it tell you?

    Everyone is sooooo good at speculating how things will be in South Dakota this fall with really limited or no actual factual data.

    Well here is a pretty good piece of data and report on the status of Crops in the state.

    Analyze it and gives us your synopsis of your findings so we can all benefit from it and use it to our advantage for planning our fall hunting strategy.

    Link is a little easier to read

    http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_...release_39.pdf

    SOUTH DAKOTA CROP PROGRESS AND CONDITION
    SIOUX FALLS, SD September 23, 2013 ? For the week ending September 22, 2013, near normal temperatures
    were recorded across most of the state last week, according to the USDA?s National Agricultural Statistics
    Service. Row crops continued to advance in maturity. Activities included seeding winter wheat, finishing up the
    hay season, scouting fields for row crop harvest, and moving livestock to fall pastures. Statewide, there were
    6.3 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 20 percent very short, 42 short, 37 adequate,
    and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 21 percent very short, 44 short, 34 adequate, and 1 surplus.
    Field Crops Report: Winter wheat seeding was 43 percent complete, ahead of 34 last year but near 44 average.
    Emerged was 6 percent complete, ahead of 1 last year but behind 10 average.
    Corn at the dent stage was 90 percent, behind 99 last year but near 92 average. Mature was 40 percent, well
    behind 86 last year, and behind 45 average. Harvested was 4 percent complete, also well behind 34 last year and
    near 7 average. Condition rated 3 percent very poor, 11 poor, 26 fair, 47 good, and 13 excellent.
    Soybeans dropping leaves were 72 percent, well behind 97 last year and 80 average. Harvested was 3 percent
    complete, also well behind 42 last year and 10 average. Condition rated 6 percent very poor, 13 poor, 32 fair,
    42 good, and 7 excellent.
    Sorghum coloring was 93 percent, behind 100 last year but near 94 average. Mature was 33 percent, well
    behind 83 last year and 38 average. Harvested was 3 percent complete, also well behind 44 last year and
    10 average. Condition rated 0 percent very poor, 3 poor, 16 fair, 67 good, and 14 excellent.
    Sunflowers with ray flowers dry were 91 percent, behind last year at 100 and 95 average. Bracts yellow were
    62 percent, well behind last year at 88 and 77 average. Bracts brown were 15 percent, well behind last year at
    54 and 20 average. Condition rated 2 percent very poor, 18 poor, 31 fair, 45 good, and 4 excellent.
    The third cutting of alfalfa was 90 percent complete, ahead of 83 last year and 82 average. Alfalfa hay condition
    rated 2 percent very poor, 8 poor, 38 fair, 46 good, and 6 excellent.
    Livestock, Pasture and Range Report: Pasture and range conditions rated 2 percent very poor, 16 poor,
    40 fair, 35 good, and 7 excellent. Stock water supplies were 5 percent very short, 26 short, 66 adequate, and
    3 surplus.
    Last edited by UGUIDE; 09-25-2013 at 07:46 AM.

  2. #2
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    111 views and the speculators are silent? I put the link to the doc in first post as it is much easier to read the report.

    I also notice that they cut way back on details and organization of the report due to federal cutbacks I assume.

  3. #3
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    Ok, I'll bite.

    Looks to me the Sorghum crops looks pretty good, half the corn crop is good and half is not so good, same with the soy beans. Half the pasture is good, and half is bad, and last but not least.......pheasant populations look really good at all the Uguide pheasant camps.

  4. #4
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    My expert opinion.... Crops are very close to 10 year average. 70% will be out by opener. Opening weekend hunters will have poor results due to low bird numbers but will claim "birds" were in remaining standing corn and tough to get too.
    All crops out by 11/8 so hunters hunting this week will see slight bump in birds.
    11/15-end of season public land hunters will see few birds as most will have been shot and those that haven't will have found private ground with little pressure to stay the winter.
    Hunters who are truthful will say this year was one of the worst years in terms of number of birds harvested.

    Bob

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by NOPLCLKNEB View Post
    Ok, I'll bite.

    Looks to me the Sorghum crops looks pretty good, half the corn crop is good and half is not so good, same with the soy beans. Half the pasture is good, and half is bad, and last but not least.......pheasant populations look really good at all the Uguide pheasant camps.
    WRONG!! Try again.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hockeybob View Post
    My expert opinion.... Crops are very close to 10 year average. 70% will be out by opener. Opening weekend hunters will have poor results due to low bird numbers but will claim "birds" were in remaining standing corn and tough to get too.
    All crops out by 11/8 so hunters hunting this week will see slight bump in birds.
    11/15-end of season public land hunters will see few birds as most will have been shot and those that haven't will have found private ground with little pressure to stay the winter.
    Hunters who are truthful will say this year was one of the worst years in terms of number of birds harvested.

    Bob
    Excellent analysis HockeyBob! Others?

  7. #7
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    Crown Point Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by UGUIDE View Post
    111 views and the speculators are silent? I put the link to the doc in first post as it is much easier to read the report.

    I also notice that they cut way back on details and organization of the report due to federal cutbacks I assume.
    I liked the way the report looked last year.......much easier to see the difference from year to year.....They also separated the corn harvest and showed silage cut...this report lumps everything into just "Corn"....as long as the weather holds out the the harvest should catch up to last year in a few weeks......

  8. #8
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    Looks to me like things are close to or just a bit below average for Crops.
    The late, cool Spring is showing up on crop maturity. The small amount of corn harvested at this point would be going in the silo.
    The late planted corn is hard to dry compared to the early planted/early maturing corn. Corn should be ripe, mature by now, dries nicely in the warm Sept days.
    So look for a lot of standing corn in the Dakotas pheasant opener.
    I agree that by mid Nov most corn will be harvested.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by UGUIDE View Post
    WRONG!! Try again.
    Dammit! Wrong again.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnmthunting View Post
    Looks to me like things are close to or just a bit below average for Crops.
    The late, cool Spring is showing up on crop maturity. The small amount of corn harvested at this point would be going in the silo.
    The late planted corn is hard to dry compared to the early planted/early maturing corn. Corn should be ripe, mature by now, dries nicely in the warm Sept days.
    So look for a lot of standing corn in the Dakotas pheasant opener.
    I agree that by mid Nov most corn will be harvested.
    I agree but things are changing quickly. Our Miller camps are combining beans 7 days a week and will start on corn when finished. Assume that is case from there north and east according to the way the drought monitor looks.

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