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Thread: Picking the Right One - Trust What or Who?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    MN-MT
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    3,572

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    Steve, welcome back. I'm telling Ya. Get a healthy Lab pup, back yard breeder or not. Get the pup young, Use a shed antler for him/her as a toy and fun, lots of hugs and praise, treats what ever.
    This is not Science! This should not be complicated
    You don't need to spend a ton of money, A fair price for sure. And for sure Your pup does NOT have to be pre trained.
    Your Lab WILL hunt shed antlers for You. Trust me.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
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    976

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mikkelson View Post
    Attentively, I'm reading every response, and have made a handful of phone calls to the leads that have been presented. Thank you and please keep them coming as it has been very helpful.

    I now have a good understanding of the titles and the associated trials, the health clearance language, and what is driving the price of the pups. Some are pricing their dogs based on the market, but some are also basing the price on health, performance of the sire and dam and pedigree. Very few can justify their price, and they are riding the coat tails of more conscious breeders. Some of the $1,000+ pups are extremely over priced relative to the accomplishments of the parents and certifications of slightly higher priced pups.

    I want a healthly dog that comes for a lineage that has proven to possess the chacteristics necessary to be a ten year plus intelligent family dog and a shed hunter. Field trialing and hunt test is a important consideration, but not absolutely necessary.
    Steve, I do raise quality Golden's but the key to quality in labs and golden's is the lineage, but also the health clearances. You cannot get those clearances until a dog is 2 years old OFA hips, elbows, heart, and eyes! Any good money spent on a dog should come with a 2 year minimum against genetic defects. I have an older gentleman who has 2 of my pups. He feels because of good breeding you can close your eyes, reach in and pull out a pup, and get what you need. He also has trained dogs longer than I have been alive and I am pushing that half century mark! You are doing your homework and you should come up with a great dog

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Western slope, Colorado
    Posts
    98

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    I'll second Candlewood ....... San Joaquin Honcho and Super Chief

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    colorado
    Posts
    197

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    if i were going to buy another labrador , i would probably look hard at the british strains,mostly because i like their body shape and compactness.i'm not a fan of overly large dogs. i keep thinking that many american strains(not just the labs) are "overbred". this may draw fire,but im not trying to offend any body else's dogs or handlers.
    also, prices have went steadily up for puppies.any dog represents 12- 14 yrs investment.what's 1200 dollars pro-rated over 13 yrs,not much.
    good luck

  5. #25

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    Im also a fan of the more compact brittish labs. you should never buy a dog based on its color or looks but a blocky, well built lab is a beautiful thing. If i were to buy another lab it would prob be from Triven or Dokkens kennels. And i know some will disagree but id go with a pointing lab, and both these kennels produce them. good luck

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    56

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    Since you mentioned MI, I would second a visit to Hunter's Rose Kennels (http://huntersrosekennel.homestead.com/) ...excellent pointing labs with all the health clearances.

    You might also want to check out another small MI breeder that has a sire with a great nose named Gator. He's a one man operation with the quest of bettering the breed of pointing labs. Also has all the health clearances. (http://www.gforceretrievers.com/aboutus.html)

    I know both have, or will soon have, pups on the ground.

    Good luck, and enjoy the journey!

    Greg
    "The Best Meal a Man Can Eat Has Already Been In His Dog's Mouth"

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Anoka, MN
    Posts
    273

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mikkelson View Post
    I am starting to prepare myself for purchasing a black lab puppy more specifically researching, and could use any advice anyone is willing to share. Feel free to PM me or reply to this post. I live in West Michigan.

    Hereís how Iím looking to use the lab (in order of importance):
    1. Shed hunting
    i. Needs a good nose
    ii. Must retrieve
    iii. Must have hunt and drive

    2. Family indoor dog Ė Brains / obedience is a must

    3. Competition in the field Ė any type

    4. Female that can provide me my next competition dog.
    i. I would enjoy having a few litters if I can acquire enough knowledge to be confident I can improve the femaleís performance through her off-spring.

    Hereís some background on me so we donít have to start with go see the parents and start with good bloodlines.
    1. Iíve raised, trained and bred competition beagles that run to catch the rabbit for 19 years
    i. Phased out due to available training land and my available time to condition the hounds as it takes a good 20 hours a week for a couple months straight to have them in the physical and mental condition to succeed.

    2. I finished CKC & AKC field champions. Also accomplished the pinnacle of it all with AKC national championship win in 2006.
    i. No intention a bragging or thinking I can do this in the retriever world, but my point is, I know the amount of work it takes to have a competition dogs that wins.

    3. Iíve bought beagles from the best breeders in the game throughout the US and Canada. Iíve bought dogs out of the best producers and Iíve bought and bred dogs with a glowing red pedigree.
    i. I know that the above does not guarantee a thing, but I have learned that creditable and accomplished breeders, proven producers and a pedigree of dogs that suit your desires increase your odds of getting a good one.

    So here are some questions that I have, but feel free to share anything you think I should consider.

    1. Any recommendations of breeders? Any in Michigan, northern Ohio or Indiana would be more easy for me to visit.

    2. Any recommendations for bloodlines?

    3. Expected price range for a female pup. Iíve seen AKC registered dogs from $100 to $1200. I do understand that the older the litter gets, the better price you will get, but you may miss out.

    4. Skeletal Health certifications of the sire and dam. Do you stay away from fair or do you only buy excellent?

    5. Should I be concerned when a breeder tells me they have never had to cull or is that just not done in the Labrador world?

    6. Is there a magazine or web site that identifies a list of the best producing sire and dam for specific types of competition?

    7. Is there a ďgodfatherĒ of labs out there that is willing to share info with me? I know some of the old timers love to pass on there knowledge and others would rather spend the time in the field.

    8. If you were to rate the main characteristics of the sire and dam I should consider, what would they be?

    If you made it this far through my post, thank you very much for reading.
    Hi Steve - I saw you were looking for a lab pup. A fellow retriever club member of mine is about to have a litter. His Dog just won the NASHDA Shed Hunting championship this year and is being bred with a male lab that won the US Pheasant Open Championship. Let me know if you want more info and I can connect you.. Located in Minnesota as well. Good luck!
    The Lone Rooster

    "Whistlin' Dixie Comin' Through The Trees"


  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Anoka, MN
    Posts
    273

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    Quote Originally Posted by mnmthunting View Post
    Steve, welcome back. I'm telling Ya. Get a healthy Lab pup, back yard breeder or not. Get the pup young, Use a shed antler for him/her as a toy and fun, lots of hugs and praise, treats what ever.
    This is not Science! This should not be complicated
    You don't need to spend a ton of money, A fair price for sure. And for sure Your pup does NOT have to be pre trained.
    Your Lab WILL hunt shed antlers for You. Trust me.
    Amen
    The Lone Rooster

    "Whistlin' Dixie Comin' Through The Trees"


  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Anoka, MN
    Posts
    273

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    additionally, go visit the breeder if you can, meet the parents of the potential pup you are buying, see the living conditions of the dogs. If the breeder cares about the dogs and they have decent lines you will get a good pup. Of course, how you raise and train it will determine the true potential.
    The Lone Rooster

    "Whistlin' Dixie Comin' Through The Trees"


  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    1,358

    Default puppies

    from what i got out of reading your post, first off, good luck, that said, from your questions and attitude you ought to get one hell-ov alot more knowledge about what you are doing before you pick a pup and then you are already thinking about breeding other batches of pups and making in all likely hood more bad labs, ie: hunting ability, eyes, hips, you name it. this is the kinda thinking that got over 1/2 the labs in this country where they are today. please slow down. we don't need more labs, we need better labs and it seems like you are more interested in cost that good stuff

    cheers

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