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Thread: A few Pheasants from around the world

  1. #141
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    1pheas4, originally posted this link, I pulled it up again because of the wealth of information it contains. We have all heard the old saying " a picture is worth a thousand words".

    http://blog1.poco.cn/myBlogDetail-ht...pri--n-0.xhtml

    Even though these photos were taken in northern China in the same area, one can clearly see that the roosters have various sizes of ring size (white collar on the neck). The first photo the rooster looks more like a regular Chinese ringneck (P. c. torquatus) or even a Korean ringneck ( P.c. karpowi).

    In the last photo the rooster has the classical markings of Manchurian ringneck (P. c. pallasi) with a broad collar and a white spot on the cheek.

    First of all we have to remember that all of the True Pheasants (ring-necked type) sub-species what is called the grey-rumped pheasant family, naturally overlap and interbreed. The hens of all of these subspecies look alike.

    So those photos may have been take in northern China just north of the Korean border where in the natural wild world the Chinese ring-necked pheasant (P.c. torqatus), the Manchurian ring-necked pheasant (P.c. pallasi) and the Korean ring-necked pheasant (P.c. karpowi) all naturally merge or overlap.

    Notice that all of the authentic wild roosters and hens maintain an alert posture and all have yellow iris.

    This is why I feel yellow eyes are important on wild hen pheasants and this is only a theory. The yellow iris may enhance their night time vision helping them quickly escape night time and 24/7 predators. All of the wild hens along the predator loaded upper Rio Grande after almost 100 years in the wild, have yellow iris.

    Owls have similar colored iris and excellent night vision. It may have something to do with the rods and cones and light.

    Those authentic wild pheasants are beautiful. We need to get more authentic wild pheasant blood (genes) imported to north America to maintain a wild, wary and predator alert gene pool. And expand the wild pheasant range to all of Kansas, all of Oklahoma and north Texas.
    Last edited by Preston1; 03-31-2017 at 10:38 AM.

  2. #142
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    As always Preston, thank you for sharing your knowledge on true pheasants with us. Hopefully we will have a way to (once again) import such birds in to the US in the future.

    As for the iris color---in the 80's and 90's most of our wild pheasants (in this area) had light tan/straw colored iris. Today, their eye color is lighter like the pheasants in the photos (yellowish like you described).

    I've watched birds around here come into rooster with very little light (almost dark). Your theory may have something to it as far as having an ability to see better in dimmer conditions, therefore more capable of seeing predators compared to birds with darker variations of iris color. As you said, just a theory.
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  3. #143
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    Check out the eBird Range-Map Ring-necked Pheasant in North America and Europe. These are pretty much accurate depictions and reports of wild pheasants sightings (over the last 5 to 10 years) from bird watchers from around the world.
    Zoom in to individual individual hotspots and personal locations. What was interesting to me was the wild pheasant sightings in Mexico and in Spain and in Homer, Alaska. Link below:

    http://ebird.org/ebird/map/rinphe
    Last edited by Preston1; 10-14-2017 at 03:18 PM.

  4. #144
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    Thank you Preston1.

    Here's a hen pheasant with her brood in NJ

    https://youtu.be/2h7-az7UnhM
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  5. #145
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    Wild male and female Formosan ring-neck pheasants (Taiwan)
    https://youtu.be/sg0vz2k37zo

    Wild male and female Versicolor pheasants (Japan)
    https://youtu.be/bh67wIwGxJQ

    MATURE/OLDER Wild male and female (Kinmen China) ---PRESTON1 DO YOU KNOW WHAT SUB-SPICES THESE PHEASANTS ARE?
    https://youtu.be/mShiRwSX0YU
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  6. #146
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    Great videos. The mature male pheasant on the first part of your last Youtube video is clearly a fine admixture of Chines ringneck and Mongolian ringneck (Kirghiz pheasant). Look at the maroon-purple rump. I have seen a few wild roosters pheasant over 40 years ago that were identical to that bird at Ft. Riley, Kansas.

    Most people don't realize that the original Kansas ringneck stock used in the stocking of pen raised pheasants came from England in 1906. Those English pheasants were made up of numerous ringneck subspecies, the Chinese ringneck, the Mongolian ringneck and also the White-Winged group (the English called their white-winged pheasants P. c. principalis from Prince of Wales). Look at the link below. Scroll down to the 9th section. "The quest for perfection".

    http://www.thefield.co.uk/shooting/t...pheasant-22364

    So how did Mongolian looking pheasant from far northern China get over 1000 miles south of its original range. I have a theory. The British were in China from 1750 to 1919, and they also ruled Hong Kong in the southern part of China up to the 1990's. That Kinmen (Xiamen) China is also in southern China on the 24th longitude ( about the same as Miami warm and humid). My guess is that that they brought in English pen raised pheasant for shooting, that tradition was continued for years by the locals and over 100 years some of the pen raised birds with the Mongolian blood line escaped and mixed with the local ringneck population. The native authentic wild (never lived in a pen and hunted all year by the locals) southern Chinese ringneck pheasant were not easy to hunt.
    Last edited by Preston1; 11-18-2017 at 04:24 PM.

  7. #147
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    My friend Tanabe Kimihito with a versicolor pheasant in Japan.

    FB_IMG_1511363756777_zpsqmao11mj.jpg
    "The happiest man is he who learns from nature the lesson of worship"

    -Ralph Waldo Emerson

  8. #148
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    thumb up. neat.

  9. #149
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    Thank you for your response Preston. Rob, that's a nice looking Versi Rooster. Thank you!

    Beautiful Wild pheasants in Russia feeding; (Notice the reddish colored rumps on their birds vs. most of our wild pheasant which have blue, green or both)

    https://youtu.be/YnFcKRTOLfE


    Fast movers! You can see the "wild" traits in these birds.

    https://youtu.be/WSUxTy-RkXM


    These birds look like wild Kirghiz/bloodlines(?); (they have a very deep bronze/reddish colored rump) Video starts around 5 min. to show the birds.

    https://youtu.be/IqCPqZ0aCeA?t=5m1s
    Last edited by 1pheas4; 01-12-2018 at 08:12 AM.
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  10. #150
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    wild Hen and rooster Kirghiz pheasants
    http://www.birdnet.cn/forum.php?mod=...t=%D2%B0%BC%A6

    I believe these are Satscheuenisis
    http://www.birdnet.cn/forum.php?mod=...t=%D2%B0%BC%A6

    http://www.birdnet.cn/forum.php?mod=...t=%D2%B0%BC%A6

    Hawk grabbing pheasant (China)
    http://www.birdnet.cn/forum.php?mod=...t=%D2%B0%BC%A6

    Here this photo where the strauchi hen stayed on the nest to protect her eggs from a fire. She protected her eggs until death came upon her. (China)
    http://www.birdnet.cn/forum.php?mod=...t=%D2%B0%BC%A6
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

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