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Thread: A few Pheasants from around the world

  1. #131
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    As always, thank you for all your links/useful information Preston!

    Here's an interesting video of two Versicolor Pheasants fighting (Japan). While doing so, a crow seems to have his sights set on pulling a tail feather from one of them. I'm not sure what a crow needs a pheasant's tail for.

    https://youtu.be/crKtud5EFro?list=PL...bc7WGpx-RBBTjx

    This video shows a handsome Versicolor up close. As I've mentioned in the past, the Versicolor pheasant is Japan's national bird.

    https://youtu.be/8SqYprsxDGg?list=PL...bc7WGpx-RBBTjx
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  2. #132
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    An old black and white clip---pheasant hunting in German.

    https://youtu.be/z-T0xm46LC0


    Photo of a wild Strauch pheasant/rooster/in China

    http://www.ctps.cn/PhotoNet/product.asp?proid=1840165

    More Strauch picture

    http://niaolei.org.cn/posts/56445

    This Manchurian rooster got caught up in some wire

    http://niaolei.org.cn/posts/9713
    Last edited by 1pheas4; 09-13-2016 at 09:21 AM.
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  3. #133
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    P.s. Satscheuensis---"Satchu" Ring-neck/rooster pheasant from the Western Kansu Province, China

    http://www.birdnet.cn/thread-1748004-1-1.html
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  4. #134
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    Bill MacFarlane, recently released an update on the special qualities of what they call the "Afghan Whitewing Pheasant". This True Pheasant is also called the Bianchi Pheasant. See link Below:

    https://www.gamebirdexpert.com/index...-special-bird/

    Over the past 50 years this particular true pheasant sub-specie have adapted well to the wild everywhere he is released. But most importantly they have help to expand the wild pheasant range in the southwestern states of New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma and Arizona.

    In a world loaded with hungry meat eating predators, that loves to eat wild pheasants. The White-Winged pheasants have added awareness, alertness and agility to the wild ringneck gene pool. Helping them to quickly escape from predators.

    One other note of interest, every wild ringneck pheasant ( that crossed with the white-winged pheasants) along the the predator loaded Rio Grande and Pecos rivers in New Mexico has yellow iris. I have a theory on why this is important.

    Check out the link below of photos of wild pheasant at Bosque Del Apache in New Mexico:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=bosq...ITHRTfD1B8M%3A

  5. #135
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    In the link below scroll down six photos to the ringneck pheasant. This wild pheasant is out side of the fence, not in a pen. This is a good front and side profile of an authentic wild pheasant, the Grey-Rumped group (ringneck family) P. c. hagenbecki) also called the Kobdo ring-necked pheasant.

    http://niaolei.org.cn/posts/52207

    The photo was probably taken in north central China near Mongolia. The pheasant is identical in appearance to the Manchurian (P. c. pallasi) but with a wider white collar , and without the white spot on the check, which is frequently seen in the Manchurian. Also notice the light yellow iris.

    I am sure there is overlap or intermediary zones or geography where both the Manchurian ringneck pheasant and the Kobdo ringneck overlap and cross.
    As I have said before we need to get more these authentic wild ringneck genes added to the wild over here, to fortify the wild, alert and predator/wary genes here. And to expand the wild pheasant range.

  6. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preston1 View Post
    As I have said before we need to get more these authentic wild ringneck genes added to the wild over here, to fortify the wild, alert and predator/wary genes here. And to expand the wild pheasant range.
    Thank you for your info/link/photos Preston! We value your insight and knowledge on the subject of wild/true pheasants!

    Earlier this fall I released a cross breed ringneck/Manchurian, the small flighty K Thunder from Macfarlane. The hens are very alert birds. Both hens and roosters are very strong flyers.

    So far so good. I'm trying to get the wild birds to cross breed with the released birds to see what will happen with bird numbers. The area has good habitat but the birds are stagnant Hopefully they can breed in the spring and increase their numbers greatly compared to what's back there right now.

    On another note. I pushed an area yesterday that has wild ringneck pheasants plus the state's pen raised birds. To this day, despite huge numbers of pen raised roosters being released (with Manchurian blood lines), they have yet to cross breed into the wild populations. The wild pheasants are a completely different bird. So it seems either 1. the wild roosters are not allowing the pen raised roosters to breed or 2. the wild hens are not finding the pen raised rooster suitable for mating or 3. both.

    It seems we have to find a way to get the two to cross. I believe this will give us a bird that is NOT so reluctant to cross roads, highways, or woods/forested areas to get to another habitat or food source area.
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  7. #137
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    Thanks for the positive comments.

    Keep up the good work on the release of the Manchurian-cross and the K Thunder. You of course well know that all Illinois wild pheasant started from pen raised pheasants first released in 1890 and in 1904. Over time your new birds will make an impact but it may take 5 or 6 years of stocking. Newly released pheasants may move in all directions, so several attempt and several years of eating wild food and developing wild pheramones and getting lucky and have a successful hatch, then you should see results. Check out link below:

    http://www.lib.niu.edu/2002/oi021206.html

    This is my take on the your Manchurian cross release pheasants crossing with the wild Illinois. They will cross but it will talk a long time. Lets call the Ill. wild pheasants the North Ill. tribe, his group have been building up in the wild for over 120 years. So you probably have hundreds of thousands or maybe a million of that original Illinois pheasant tribe (wild) in every field and weedy lot in north central Illinois.

    So the chances of finding a Manchurian-wild Illinois cross would be rare or very remote, but there is no way to say that Manchurian- wild Illinois cross does not happen. The bird will cross over time.

    I would simple like to see the wild pheasant range expand, giving more hunters chances to flush truly wild pheasant. Not tame preserve pheasants.
    Last edited by Preston1; 11-30-2016 at 09:30 PM.

  8. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preston1 View Post
    Newly released pheasants may move in all directions
    That's what they did. The last time I was out there I could hear them cackling from all directions. I was impressed how soon they found other habitat areas around the property.

    A few weeks ago I saw one of the roosters walking outside some cover (along the road). I turned my truck around to run/flush him away from the road (I want them to fear cars and people as much as possible). As soon as I started heading back his way he ran into the cover. Very fast too! He disappeared deep into the cover within a split-second.

    Also, and I know this is going to sound really funny to a lot of people, but one other thing I did (just prior to releasing) was wash their feet and tails in clean pond water. After removing all the dirt and strong smelling "pheasant-pen" sent, I sprayed them with a fairly heavy coat of sent block. I know from experience that the first few nights in the wild are some of the most deadly for pen-birds. I figured if I can remove as much "pheasant-pen" sent/smell from them as possible they may have a better chance of making it through the night. Based on the number of surviving birds I could hear cackling weeks after release, it seemed to work.

    When I purchased these birds, I made sure it was as early in the season as possible too. They weren't to a point where they were used to people coming in and out of their pens. They still has a healthy, natural fear of people. Particularly the hens. Plus, corn was still up. This allowed them to feed in the safety of standing corn and explore the property plus become familiar with what's-what.

    Time will tell what happens from here.
    Last edited by 1pheas4; 12-17-2016 at 08:14 AM.
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  9. #139
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    Wild ringneck pheasants in the Netherlands (they look identical to wild pheasants here in McHenry County IL.)

    https://youtu.be/tTaLy3FfsgY
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  10. #140

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    Very informative and very interesting.

    Keep it coming. You guys are fantastic.


    Sure would like learn how states like Illinois can
    get repopulated!?

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