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Thread: Chicks

  1. #21
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    What is the name of the medication?
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    When you think you are smarter than your dog, ask your self who cleans up who's poo.

  2. #22
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    I just finished up reading "Robertson's PHEASANTS" I can recommend it for interesting reading. And yes it is available at Amazon good used for a few bucks.

    The Great Britain and European/Asian Studies and history are of interest.

    Most of the Basic stuff in the book on pheasant behavior are like going back to grade school, stuff I got out of the way probably before Robertson knew what a pheasant was.

    Very little knowledge of North American Pheasants, habitat, production or methods of hunting.

    British studies on pheasants have very little to do with the birds we know.

    IMO, This is basic stuff and should NOT be used in North American Pheasant Management.

    Happy to discuss more on this with others that have read or will read "Robertson's PHEASANTS"

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnmthunting View Post
    Most of the Basic stuff in the book on pheasant behavior are like going back to grade school, stuff I got out of the way probably before Robertson knew what a pheasant was.
    Wayne, it's basic too you because you've been studying pheasants since you were a kid. This too is the case for some on this forum, but for many, this book will serve as a foundation builder on the world of pheasants, habitat, and survival, etc.

    I talk with a lot of folks at outdoor expos who don't have the slightest clue about pheasants 101. Robertson's book is a great place to start.

    In regards to studies being done in the U.S., Britten/UK, most of these studies are transferable from region to region.

    One study in particular that is not applicable to our birds here in the U.S. is the study finding a birds nesting in forested/wooded areas within Europe. Forests/woods serve as barriers for our birds here in the U.S. Let alone nesting within them.
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  4. #24
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    Robertson's PHEASANTS is well worth reading.
    Last edited by mnmthunting; 07-10-2012 at 10:11 AM.

  5. #25
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    What is the medication in the shot called?
    http://www.bluerivergundogs.com/Home_Page.html

    When you think you are smarter than your dog, ask your self who cleans up who's poo.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnmthunting View Post
    There are a few things needed to be discussed about Robertson's book as relative to North American Pheasants.
    British use so many reared pheasants in there supply of hunted birds. A very high percentage apparently. Didn't take long for me to realize the difference between US reared pheasants compared to the British. Other experienced in US reared pheasants will likely agree. The British obviously concentrated more on size and eating quality, not near so much in the USA. Robertson mentions large, fat, lazy flying type birds.
    A big thing that had me scratching my head is. Pen raised Pheasants are referred to as "chickens" in Great Britain, roost in trees when released. Photos show game keepers walking amongst released pheasants, released pheasants getting attached to humans etc. I've been raising pheasants in various numbers for about 50 years, Robertson has had 1 year of personal experience, although he has contacts with British pheasant rearing farms.
    Once American pen raised pheasants are released, their gone, no walking amongst them with food, they are scared to death of humans and certainly have not been evolved to roost off the ground.
    So much study went into, why 1 rooster would attract say 5 hens and the next rooster 2 hens? PHD's theorizing? "It's the spur length" "it's the redness on the head" must be the plumage"
    To me it would really be strange if the roosters divided the hens up equally. Like each will have 3 hens.

    There are just so many things in this book that just don't pertain to North American Pheasants.

    The main thing I learned in Robertson book is, There is a huge difference in just about everything when comparing American pheasant production with that of Great Britain. Just about NOT the same bird.
    Damn. I'm sorry I recommend the book.
    "Through license fees and excise tax on arms and gear, sportsmen contribute over $200 million per year for wildlife conservation programs" (U.S. fish and wildlife service)

    http://www.pheasantfreaks.com

  7. #27
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    The British pheasant was introduced by the Romans. As it exists today is as a remnant population now then when in was in it's heyday. Those days began to disappear in the 1980's. Cost to keep big grounds, price of commodities, wheat was $11.15 per bushel, in 1983 when I was there, they got 50 bushels per acre average. Hedgerows, fallow field, Khale fields, were all forsaken to the god of american agriculture, chemicals, fertilizer, bigger fields, on a small overall acreage. Results Hungarian Partridges and pheasants, gone, supplied by game farm birds. In my opinion, they do a good job, they conscentrate on high flyers, with great excelleration, small birds, mostly black or green roosters, many without ringnecks. They shoot driven birds. After which they may do a "rough shoot" with dogs. The exact thing is happening to our birds here. In the eastern part of the country, all the way to Illinios. Because we happen to live where this thing isn't happening, where the population is unstressed, doesn't mean that disease control, adaptive release techniques, are of no use to you. I think that using medicated feed is a poor choice in pheasant diets, yes you will lose some, so does mother nature. If your results are to get a sturdy bird that can thrive in nature it's the best. All leasons learned now, habits, pen release birds, pathogens, reintroducing techniques, might help us later on. We have the example of bobwhite quail, a native, a bird we have science from the 1930's as an anthem. We are just beginning to get new science, and knowledge we weren't aware of previously, at a time we are fighting for the future of the species! It we knew all this before, we would have have 25 year head start. In a death due us part, all possibilities are on the table.
    Last edited by oldandnew; 07-08-2012 at 06:09 PM.

  8. #28
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    Good gosh, any one of you book learners remember what the med is? I don't want to spend the time to read LOL. Just curious if it is a med we put in food any way?
    http://www.bluerivergundogs.com/Home_Page.html

    When you think you are smarter than your dog, ask your self who cleans up who's poo.

  9. #29
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    Oh, not IA but saw another nice clutch a mile from the house again tonight. 3-4 weekers again and a good group. So I gots plenty to scare the heck out of again. Lookin good.
    http://www.bluerivergundogs.com/Home_Page.html

    When you think you are smarter than your dog, ask your self who cleans up who's poo.

  10. #30
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    1pheas4, don't stop, keep recommending interesting wild pheasant stuff for us to look at and read. I really enjoy the wild pheasant photos, videos, articles and web links you recommend.

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