PDA

View Full Version : over/under



kscountryboy11
12-09-2010, 02:35 AM
alright..So ive mad a decision that i need a new shotgun :D

i used to shoot a cheap over/under and really like the gun, but had to retire it, it kicked like a mule and was fairly heavy. ive already got my mind made up that i want another o/u but i dont have alot of knowledge when it comes to o/u's. im not wanting to get just some cheap gun, ive been savin some money here and there, and would like to get a good o/u after the season. im looking for something that is fairly light and a good gun overall. any suggestions? i kno the big names(benelli, beretta) but i kno nothing about their o/u's. any help and suggestions would be great.

Dakotazeb
12-09-2010, 09:03 AM
alright..So ive mad a decision that i need a new shotgun :D

i used to shoot a cheap over/under and really like the gun, but had to retire it, it kicked like a mule and was fairly heavy. ive already got my mind made up that i want another o/u but i dont have alot of knowledge when it comes to o/u's. im not wanting to get just some cheap gun, ive been savin some money here and there, and would like to get a good o/u after the season. im looking for something that is fairly light and a good gun overall. any suggestions? i kno the big names(benelli, beretta) but i kno nothing about their o/u's. any help and suggestions would be great.

FYI, Benelli doesn't make O/U's. Browning and Beretta are a couple of good ones you will want to look at. Thre are also a number of other good O/U's on the market. I would encourage you to head to a store like Cabelas or a good gun shop that stocks a lot of the various models. Try shouldering them and see what fits you the best. The Browning Citori comes in a number of different models and each may feel a little different. You said your old O/U "kicked like a mule" and you also say you want something "fairly light". Be careful here, the lighter the gun, generally the more the felt recoil will be.

Ranger Danger
12-09-2010, 09:05 AM
Beretta 686 or Ruger Red Label. I chose the 686 years ago because it felt better to me.

Fenway
12-09-2010, 09:47 AM
I would recommend any field Beretta or a lightweight citori, stay away from the Red Label a nice gun but way to heavy to carry in a 12. Many nice Italian o/u if you want to pay some dollars, not that Beretta's are cheap, but they do have some nice entry level models that are very nice,

cockerfan
12-09-2010, 10:37 AM
I shoot a Citori lightening and love it. That being said, the best shooting O/U I've ever shot was Remington Peerless. My brother used to have a Red Label, but it kicked like a mule, and I've heard the same complaint from several other people. We didn't think the Red Label was as study as the Citori either.

Really, go in and shoulder a bunch of them. You'll find that the Berettas shoulder very differently from the Brownings. Beretta, Browning, Ruger, Remington, Weatherby, any of those are good guns; just find the one that you like.

Dakotazeb
12-09-2010, 10:52 AM
If you are considering used guns there are some real nice SKB's out there. And they are a solid gun. But they do handle and feel different from some others. You have to shoulder it to see for yourself. Good luck.

CRP
12-09-2010, 11:23 AM
You have a choice. An 8lb O/U will be heavy to carry but tame the recoil of heavy field loads. Under 8lbs, it will be nice to carry but belt you pretty good with those same loads (unless you actually like the pain).

FCSpringer
12-09-2010, 12:01 PM
What I do is look at a ton of em first and find a brand that pulls up and fits nice with out modification, that helps resale down the road if you don't hack a gun up. The light weight guns are nice but you will maybe want to look at some sporting clay guns with ported barrels. The reason is they kick less and you can go lighter that way. A longer barrel is also helpfull with kick and swings nicer. I have a Cortona Grande Sporting, and love it, it fits perfect. I take the factory recoil pads off and put on a Limb saver and that helps as well. Some as browning etc. have those special recoil pads in them if the gun fits. For me none did unfortunatly. Some finer guns will even have wooden or hard pads, but if it's the right gun, you can change that out easy with out changing the integrity of your gun. You can spend a little more on one that fits any way because if you pay less for one that doesn't, you won't shoot well, or will have to pay more for modification. For me a Cesar Gerinni, Rizinni, Cortona, and couple Huglu's or CZ's fit well. The CZ I bought first because of cost. Deadly gun for me, but got heavy. So thats the reason I ended up with what I have. And it took allot of shopping around and looking to figure it out. No matter how many times I tried, a Browning for example, that did not fit at Scheels, would not fit at Cabelas either.:D Then one day I opened my eyes on some and it was all there. It is fun looking all of them over for the right gun.

kdeckels
12-09-2010, 12:42 PM
I fancy a Ruger Red in 26" 12, it just felt good & shot good.

copheasanthunter
12-09-2010, 03:00 PM
Kscountryboy,
All of these suggestions are good and a lot of merit to them, what you might considering doing is getting with some friends, family or ? and asking them if you can try one of their O/Us and see what works best for you. What is nice here close to where I live a sporting clays range here has some of the guns reps come out to their range with their new guns for the year or last couple of years back and for I believe $5.00 you can try any off their guns at I believe 10 clay bird. Might look for something like that around there perhaps.

bobeyerite
12-09-2010, 03:11 PM
Fausti is a fine Italian made gun. CDNN has some of them on sale and I have one in 20 gauge I use all the time. Check them out if you can on the CDNN website.......Bob

blueweim
12-09-2010, 04:17 PM
If you are looking to purchase pretty quick you might want to check with a store call specialty sports in colorado springs. They have a lot of o/u on sale at the moment and they usually have good prices to start with. For example a Browning cynergy field is on sale for 1299 or a ceasar guerini woodlander is 1900 (same gun is 3200 at bass pro shop). Might be worth a call if you know what you are looking for. They probably have a ton of o/u in stock.

kscountryboy11
12-09-2010, 05:13 PM
If you are looking to purchase pretty quick you might want to check with a store call specialty sports in colorado springs. They have a lot of o/u on sale at the moment and they usually have good prices to start with. For example a Browning cynergy field is on sale for 1299 or a ceasar guerini woodlander is 1900 (same gun is 3200 at bass pro shop). Might be worth a call if you know what you are looking for. They probably have a ton of o/u in stock.

i wont be purchasing for another couple months, i want to make to sure im completly happy with a gun and it shoulders right and everything, i jus made a post to see what others opinions on recoil and weight ratios on o/u's since i dont know alot about them, just like i wasnt aware that benelli didnt make o/u's( told u i didnt kno anything bout them :D)but all these post have gave more knowledge and now i just gotta find the right gun. im not worried about $$ , i just know about spending a ton of money, and getting my gun beat up.

blueweim
12-09-2010, 05:26 PM
good luck with your quest.

I can attest to the light gun kicks like a mule. I just purchased a 12ga guerini that is about 6.5lbs with a wood butt plate. I figured it can't be that bad. Shot a box of shells at the gun club no problem. Went hunting with prairie storm loads and after 14 rounds in 3 days my shoulder was killing me. I found myself not shooting if it was a questionable shot on the 3rd day.

The problem is I really like how it shoulders with the wood butt. It just slides right into place where my other shot gun has a soft recoil pad and at times it gets caught on the way up. I think I am going to try the browning recoil pad that goes in your shirt because the gun is just so quick that I just can't give it up.

pheasantaddict
12-09-2010, 09:22 PM
I'll vote for a Caesar Guerini. I have the Magnus, just under 7lbs. I like the wood butt plate also. Shoot Prairie storm, golden pheasant, federals PF, and Hevi shot 3in. I have never noticed recoil, but I lift boulders for a living and have been hit many times in one form or another so I might not be the best judge about recoil. CG has come out with some new o/u the past two years that look pretty nice. Shoulder a few SxS's also. Have some fun shouldering those guns.

wesslpointer
12-10-2010, 12:41 AM
You have a choice. An 8lb O/U will be heavy to carry but tame the recoil of heavy field loads. Under 8lbs, it will be nice to carry but belt you pretty good with those same loads (unless you actually like the pain).

Right on I only shoot my o/u on sporting clays and doves. I carry a full size 12 ga gas auto that only weights 6.2lb for huntting wild Pheasants.

CRP
12-10-2010, 10:17 AM
I actually have 3 Citori's (20/16/12) but only hunt with the 20 and 16. They each weigh around 7lbs and the recoil is tolerable. The 625 12 GA is for clays only with 7/8 and 1 oz. loads. With an O/U, you don't lose your hulls.

My main field gun is a Browning Maxus. It too weighs 7lbs for ease of carry but the gas system cuts the recoil, even with 3' loads.

If you can stand the punch delivered from the light O/U's without developing a flinch, then go for it!

EEK
12-10-2010, 10:25 AM
I just bought a franci rennaisance from sportsmans for 899.00 after rebate its a 12 and weighs 6lb 3 oz, havent shot it yet:)

keith207
12-10-2010, 11:46 AM
I have a Browning Citori superlight/upland. It has an english stock with invector chokes. The weight is 7 lbs and shoots 2 3/4" shells only, wich is fine for all upland birds. The citoris are built to last and are a nice gun to shoot.

Here is one on GunBroker; http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=204818847

Keith

blueweim
12-10-2010, 11:48 AM
I have a Browning Citori superlight/upland. It has an english stock with invector chokes. The weight is 7 lbs and shoots 2 3/4" shells only, wich is fine for all upland birds. The citoris are built to last and are a nice gun to shoot.

Here is one on GunBroker; http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=204818847

Keith

Hey Keith how do you like the english stock? I just picked one up and I love it so far

keith207
12-10-2010, 07:02 PM
Hey Keith how do you like the english stock? I just picked one up and I love it so far

I love them. In addition to the 12 ga Citori english stock, I also have a 20 ga english stocked Citori and an 1187 with an english stock. The 20 ga is for grouse here in MI and the 1187 is for steel shot.

wolfcreeknc
02-04-2011, 11:08 AM
+2 on the citori superlight. I have been shooting one in 20 gauge for over 15 years. Just picked up one in 12 gauge and was concerned about the recoil; turns out it is not a problem and I will not be using "shoulder crusher" loads. I figure 1 1/8 to 1 1/4 oz @ 1300 f/s should be fine on pheasants (home brewed loads). Note that this is not the newer superlight feather, the feathers are in the low 6 lb on the 12 gauge and I suspect they will kick harder but a recoil pad would calm that down some. The citori's are great guns and this now makes the 3rd one I own and I have never had a mechanical issue with them in the past 17 years. The Superlight with the english stock and the 26" barrel is a quick handling fine shooting gun. Of course personal fit makes all the difference. I have added a mid-bead on the rib to help keep my head down; train the brain to make sure only one speck is on the rib when looking at the target.

dustin mudd
02-04-2011, 09:26 PM
+3 have been using a superposed superlight browning for 4 years. Had chokes installed, and at 6.5 pounds carries well all day. I have shot a few rounds of clays during last summer with it, and after 100 shots, my shoulder was a bit tender, but not hurting.... that said how many times do you shoot in a day in the field..... i want to get another one ! Mine is 12 gauge!

I would look at citori, just because they arent a collector gun. I bought mine priced right, as the guy didnt know what he had! good searching

wolfcreeknc
02-04-2011, 09:39 PM
Dustin,
I like the 20 gauge particularly for grouse huning here in the NC mountains. Lots of steep terranin to climb so having that 6.25 LB gun is nice. For the last 12 years I have used it in the pheasant/quail fields of Kansas and on day 4 it is stll easy to carry but the 12 gauge will offer a little more variety in loads for those tenacious pheasant. I have a 425 in the corral for clays as well. With 3 boys I have been collecting 20 gauges for them :thumbsup: er..maybe me in the interium and I have a nice light Benelli M1 field too in 20 gauge but having the two chokes on the guns does have a nice advantage; a third shot is nice on the auto but the 4th usually is just a waste of a shot.
For what ever reason I have had to send the Benelli back to them 2X for repairs (they covered the repair cost) but it sure is a drag to hear a click when you expect a boom and a dropping bird. Never, never had that happen on the citori's.

bobeyerite
02-04-2011, 10:13 PM
Wolf, After the 2nd breakdown, if it was me that Benelli would be traded for something else ASAP.......Bob

onpoint
02-04-2011, 10:41 PM
I have had a half doz Benellies at least. Everyone of them had issues. I just picked up a 20ga Montefeltro just a short time ago, as I like the light weight little 20 with choke tubes so I can shoot steel though it. Lets hope it doesn't follow the track record of the others. I almost always can be found with a O/U in my hands instead. I like knowing that the gun will go bang every time.

FCSpringer
02-04-2011, 10:59 PM
For all that like the OU light with hard plates, and EEK you will see kick with that light one too, try a Limb Saver or comparable recoil pad. They work great.:thumbsup: Have it droped off at a good smith and he will make it look beautiful & the right length. My cortona is light and I can blast all day. It's my ears that catch heck.:D

wolfcreeknc
02-05-2011, 09:42 AM
Bobby, you're probably right:D but both malfunctions did have explanations. The first was the first time the gun was used; the main spring was just not strong enough to push the bolt in the proper place if I jarred it while walking causing the firing pin not to strike the primer, factory defect but real bummer when you pull the trigger the first time on a bird and click. They promptly fixed it. The second came 4 or 5 years later (December 2009) out there in Kansas when the temps were hitting a high of 10 or 12 degrees for the day. I had primer dents on some shells but no bang. This could be a function of the lubrication in the mechanism getting sluggish or as Benelli tried to point out, Fiochi had some issues with primers. The other side of that is my buddy was shooting the same gun and same shells but did not have any issues, his was a new version maybe without the same lube situation. The first night after being afield we stripped the guns down parallel to each other and his hammer was swinging more smoothly than mine; sent it back. I must say, when the gun functions correctly it is great so I will give it one last chance, but it will probably be one of my boys that give it a go next.

Shadow
02-08-2011, 10:31 AM
bought a Browning Citori Upland Special 20- it kicked a bit with heavy loads- fit perfect so I had the gun shop install a recoil pad to be the exact length-
weight is 5lbs 8 oz- ducks, doves, quail, and pheasants- even with the short barrels and light weight it does nicely on everything- I set my Beretta AL2 aside quite a few years ago- this is just a pleasure to carry and shoot-never have had any problems-

http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj7/layoutboat/IMG_0001-12.jpg