PDA

View Full Version : browning Vs browning.



guff
03-25-2010, 01:05 PM
hello everyone, what a great site this is!

I have finally saved up some play money and I am planning on getting a pair of guns to use for everything from jump shooting ducks to grouse and doves. I also do a lot of backyard clay busting but nothing serious.
but Im having a hard time figuring out exactly what set up to get (never thought I would have this problem.

my choices so far are:
12gauge: 625 citori feather or 625 vector pro field grade
as far as I can tell the only diff is the feather is lighter.

and for the 20gauge: browning citori superlight feather (with the straight stock)
or
a citori white lightning.

but then I have lusted after a 28 for along time, but don't think my hunting situations would warrant spending that much on a gun I would only use twice a year.

any input on these guns would be great, if one I picked is crap please tell me, if there is a better alternative I would love to hear that aswell.

thanks in advance!

jnormanh
03-25-2010, 04:12 PM
Those are all fine guns. Browning has never made any crap OUs. No way to say which is best for you. Handle them, mount them, swing them, and go for the one(s) which feel like they were made for you.

As far as 20 or 28 gauge, there's no reason for both. The 28 loads are 3/4 and one oz, and 20 ga are 7/8 and one oz, plenty for pheasant. 20 ga with 3" chamber can handle up to 1-5/16, but if you want to shoot that heavy, get a 12 ga.

The only big difference between 20 and 28 is that 20 ga loads are always available everywhere are are cheap, 28 ga are harder to find and cost a bit more.

Bottom line, the 20 is a bit more practical, but the 28 is sweeter. If I had it all to do over again, I'd probably own nothing but 28s.

If you can't kill pheasants with a 28, you won't kill them with a 10 ga.

Dakotazeb
03-25-2010, 04:22 PM
You have asked a loaded question. There is no correct answer.

All the guns you mentioned are great. You just have to go with the ones that feel the best to you. What feels good to me may not to you. I have a Citori White Lightning in 16 ga. that I absolutely love but it doesn't mean it's the right gun for you.

Good luck, you can't make a wrong decision.

guff
03-25-2010, 04:35 PM
I guess it was a bit of a loaded question.
I was just wondering out of the choices I had if there were any stinkers or anything im overlooking.

like the citori feather in 12 vs the vector pro... am I going to miss that 12oz when shooting clays and doing jump/pass shooting for duck? im a big dude and recoil doesn't bother me unless im shooting a mule kicker.

and as far as the 20 with the straight stock is concerned, I once read that straight stocks are superfluous on an over&unders due to the way you hold your wrist. that being said I think they look cool as all get out.

and as far as the 28 goes I will be doing all my pheasant hunting over flushing dogs so the shots will be a bit further out than with a pointer, will the 28 handicap me at all? I would imagine long range shots aren't the best?

Is there any drawbacks to having porting on the barrels of a field gun? any benefits?

thanks for all the input!

JMc
03-25-2010, 04:39 PM
Here's my 2 cents: Have you shot a straight stock O/U...if not you might want to before you buy. The drop and cast caused me some problems. As for the feather vs. any other. I have Browning Cynergy Feathers in 20 & 12. I had a standard weight Citori...notice the key word, HAD. The feather is the way to go. As for guage, don't ask me; :D, I have a 410, 28, three 20's, one 16, and 3 12's. I never know what I'm going to pull out of the safe.

Dakotazeb
03-25-2010, 04:45 PM
I have a 410, 28, three 20's, one 16, and 3 12's. I never know what I'm going to pull out of the safe.

Jim, you make me sick! :) Actually I'm just jealous.


like the citori feather in 12 vs the vector pro... am I going to miss that 12oz when shooting clays and doing jump/pass shooting for duck? im a big dude and recoil doesn't bother me unless im shooting a mule kicker.

I think you can go too light and pay the price with excessive recoil, especially with heavy loads.

jnormanh
03-25-2010, 05:05 PM
I guess it was a bit of a loaded question.
I was just wondering out of the choices I had if there were any stinkers or anything im overlooking.

like the citori feather in 12 vs the vector pro... am I going to miss that 12oz when shooting clays and doing jump/pass shooting for duck? im a big dude and recoil doesn't bother me unless im shooting a mule kicker.

and as far as the 20 with the straight stock is concerned, I once read that straight stocks are superfluous on an over&unders due to the way you hold your wrist. that being said I think they look cool as all get out.

and as far as the 28 goes I will be doing all my pheasant hunting over flushing dogs so the shots will be a bit further out than with a pointer, will the 28 handicap me at all? I would imagine long range shots aren't the best?

Is there any drawbacks to having porting on the barrels of a field gun? any benefits?

thanks for all the input!

Porting became a fad about 25 years ago - it's supposed to reduce recoil and/or muzzle jump. Well...the only way it can do that is to vent enough gas, and since most folks find no difference in shot velocity with porting, it isn't venting much gas, is it?

Whether porting reduces recoil, I don't think so, but I don't know for certain. What I do know is that it increases muzzle blast to the side, and sometimes spits out bits of hot plastic and sometimes lead, and folks standing close to you won't like it.

Will a 28 ga handicap you? Compared to what? If you're talking birds at 35 yards and under, probably not. At 50 yards, compared to a 2 oz 12 ga load, yes. Can you actually center up birds, and do you shoot at them at 50 yards?

I don't shoot at 50 yard birds, since the likely result is a pellet or two in the gut, a bird which flies off to die of peritonitis a few days later.

Others will have a different opinion.

onpoint
03-25-2010, 06:39 PM
First off, if you have to shoot non toxic shot anywhere. IMO that takes the 28 out of the equation. Most can't afford to shoot Bismuth or other Prem. non toxic loads and 28 ga steel is very limited and not very effective.

I would lean towards the 20ga. I have a Citori 20ga straight stock O/U with 26" barrel's. Nice gun. I also have a 12ga 3.5" camo Browning Cynergy. The Cynergy fits me like no other gun has in the past. It's performed flawless for three season's. Also it has a 5 year Warr. and comes with a $500.00 Cynergy club rebate/cynergy club gear.

I'm hoping to move some things. I have been diagnosed with a major health issue and I need to get a gun with a very light weight. It's my only hope for continuing to get some time in the field. The Cynergy Feather 20ga with 26" barrel's weigh's in at 4lbs 12 oz's.

Nothing wrong with any of the guns you have chosen. Browning doesn't make a bad O/U. I have had several over the years. All performed flawless.

Good luck on whatever you choose. Keep us posted, we enjoy someone getting a new gun about as much as us getting one ourselves..LOL

bobeyerite
03-25-2010, 07:52 PM
I shoot a lot of Trap. I see a lot of Porting on the Trap Range. Most of the guy's that have say they wish it wasn't there or I should never of had it done. They all feel it is just a waste of money. No real benefits to the shooter comes from it...........Bob

moellermd
03-25-2010, 10:19 PM
and as far as the 20 with the straight stock is concerned, I once read that straight stocks are superfluous on an over&unders due to the way you hold your wrist. that being said I think they look cool as all get out.

My understanding was that the straight stocks were designed for double triggers. You can slide your hand down to reach the other trigger easier. That being said I shoot a 11-87 with a straight stock.

goldeneye
03-26-2010, 02:51 AM
Guff
I think you got alot of good advise so far. If you want to try a ported barrel they make ported chokes you could try. I would not port a barrel way to loud while hunting. I would change the butt pad if recoil was a issue.
As far as 28 or 20 gage for no other reason I would go with the 20 for the ease of finding shells.
Good luck let us know what you end up with.

bobeyerite
03-26-2010, 10:22 AM
Guff, I shoot a 28 gauge and have for years. I shoot it on Trap and wild birds including Pheasant. To be a shooter with a 28 you must be a pretty fair shot. I shoot mine on trap mainly to keep in tune with it. So when That big ole' rooster gets up. I know I have a better than 50/50 chance of bringing it down. You will find the 28 is very lethal little weapon and you have the right idea on it. It will do anything a 12 ga. will do only the shooter has to do it 3/4 ounce. But that is not really true. They are making shells with larger shot loads now and I don't like them, but a lot of shooters do. There is a strange Phenomenon with the 28. 7 shot and I do mean 7 shot. They usually have to be reloaded as nobody makes them. That shell at about 1250 FPS to 1300 FPS is a very deadly load. I bag more birds with that load than any other in 3/4 ounce. I only shoot 3/4 ounce for I'm a 28 purist. If I want heavier loads I will use my 20 gauge. I hope this helps you................Bob

JMc
03-26-2010, 11:38 AM
A couple of things:

Dakotazeb...half of those are hand me downs because my dad is an O/U freak. If he doesn't like it, I grab it and put it in my safe hoping that he will forget about them...:D. He never gets rid of a gun

Bob...I found some shells at my local Gander Mtn. 3/4oz with 7 shot.

I love my new RRL 28 but agree the 20 is much easier to find a variety of loads in as well as MUCH cheaper if you don't reload. I also agree the Cynergy fits like no other O/U. I'm not a ported fan but as everybody says, I also drive a Chevy and my dog has a stubby tail so get what you want :p.

guff
03-26-2010, 12:52 PM
thanks for all the comments and input, it is greatly appreciated.

unfortunately 90% of my pheasant hunting will be done on release sites where non toxic shot is required, so I think I will save the 28 for later.

Im glad no one is thrilled with porting, if it were a big performance issue I might be a little more inclined, but I kept thinking that debri is going to work its way in there while hunting the thick stuff. besides its spendy.

it seems like there is quite a large jump in price for brownings as the finish gets fancier on each model... but mechanically the field grade is the same as the grade VII right? you just don't cry as loud when your lab puppy chews on the stock or you drop it, right?

bobeyerite
03-26-2010, 01:01 PM
Jim, There is good reason I didn't know Gander MT. had those 7 shot shells. We don't have a Gander this far west. I have never been in one. Do you by chance remember what Brand Name those 7 shot shells were?...........Bob

Keepin' Up with the Dogs
03-26-2010, 10:07 PM
IF I remember correctly Michael McIntosh wrote an article explaining that the barrel configuration of the o/u being deeper made the pistol grip or semi-pistol grip the more compatible option for keeping both hands in the same "plane". That is way too much thinking for me. My first shotgun was a Citori Featherlight Field grade with the straight stock, when my new gun (a side by side) acts up I go back to old faithful. I am inclined to believe it is a matter of personal preference rather than a decided advantage or disadvantage.

Due to the fact that I am the living embodiment of Murphy's Law, I have to ask if you have considered buying a pair of guns; same gauge, same barrel length, same trigger and stock configuration? My Citori has never failed me in 23 years but in case it does..... being able to reach in the truck and pull out another one "just like it" would sure be nice. No possibility of mixing 20 or 28 gauge shells in with your 12's, no adjustment to a gun that doesn't weigh or handle the same. The British, who perfected the shotgun, are strong proponents of the matched pair.

Just a thought.

Good luck with whatever you buy.

onpoint
03-27-2010, 07:22 AM
Jim, There is good reason I didn't know Gander MT. had those 7 shot shells. We don't have a Gander this far west. I have never been in one. Do you by chance remember what Brand Name those 7 shot shells were?...........Bob

Bob, the only 7 shot loads I have seen for any gauge were these Winchester Xpert steel shot dove loads. I bought all that Wal-Mart had a few years ago in Sioux Falls. (20-2.75-7shot) for $2.99 a box. I have never shot a single shell from them. Maybe some skeet loads are loaded by somebody. I have a bunch of 28Ga shells and no 28 gauge gun right now.

jnormanh
03-28-2010, 09:43 AM
The only factory #7 lead loads I've seen were 1-1/4 oz 12 gauge loads intended for box bird shooting. Winchester sold theirs under the Super Pigeon brand and I think Federal loaded similar. Box bird shooters now use mostly 7.5. AFAIK there are no longer any factory #7 lead, although there are some [expensive] tungsten and bismuth.

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=shotshells+%237&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&cid=13360098245953422859&sa=title#p

Reloaders can probably find some bagged #7 lead.

I have talked to a couple old-timers who swore by #7 lead for pheasants.

tmrichardson
03-28-2010, 10:09 AM
Quite certain someone made (maybe still makes) 7 shot lead, I think it's a more standard european size. But it's not Remington, Federal, Winchester, or Fiocchi. Check into outfits like BP, Rio, and the like.

As to the original question, none of the guns you mentioned are clunkers. In your shoes, I might think of two guns for different needs...one heavier gun for waterfowl/turkey/doves/clays etc. and one lighter one for chukars, grouse, etc.

Skip the 28 due to lack of reasonable non-tox availability. If you go 20 I would suggest something that can handle 3" shells, not because they are needed but at times you may find non-tox ammo in 2 3/4" to suit your needs hard to come by.

Thinking light again, I'd also lean towards a Cynergy feather 20 rather than a citori. I've handled a few of them and they really are light, but at least for me seem well balanced.

I'm just not a big fan of Browning 12's, nothing mechanical or quality wise just prefer other brands--Beretta, SKB, Rizzini, Guerini. If money wasn't an object I'd look into B. Rizzini guns.

bobeyerite
03-28-2010, 12:41 PM
TMR, The British 6 shot is what you are thinking of. It is not true 7 shot as it is only 6.66 of 7. But a lot of shooters claim it works about the same as 7 shot.........Bob