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  #51  
Old Yesterday, 10:12 AM
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fsentkilr fsentkilr is offline
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Originally Posted by sschultz View Post
I will bet that more hens are shot by accident than are killed by falconers.
That doesn't mean it isn't illegal, if a game warden see you shoot one on accident you get a ticket. If its not legal to shoot them it shouldn't be legal to hunt them and kill them any other way.
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  #52  
Old Today, 10:04 AM
chase0109 chase0109 is offline
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Originally Posted by gsh lover View Post
What a subject!! This is so cool. Please keep sharing your stories to us. Makes the ice storms feel warmer.
Hi gsh lover,
I'm happy you enjoy the thread. I will post some pics and updates once I get back to KS. I'll be going out with KansasGsp (member here) next weekend. I'll post how that goes and hopefully he can give a report based on what he sees in the field.

Thanks,

Chase
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  #53  
Old Today, 10:14 AM
chase0109 chase0109 is offline
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Originally Posted by BrownDogsCan2 View Post
Toad how many hens would your bird have caught by now if you would have left him in the nest.
Hi BrownDogsCan2,
I know this questions was directed at Toad. But because I have a vast amount of experience with raptors I'll give it a go answering it.

Toad trapped his bird as a passage. Basically a fancy word meaning a young of the year bird that has fledged and hunting on its own but not completed its first winter. So his bird was out and hunting before he trapped it. Normally most redtails survive on rodents as a staple. Maybe a few cottontails thrown in if were lucky. But mice and meadow voles mostly.

I would say 98% of Redtails never taste a pheasant. They will surely try if they get the option, but it would be extremely rare for a wild or trained RT to catch a pheasant. The cover pheasants use, coupled with escape tactics, and there heavy feathering make it extremely difficult.

So I would bet the farm that Toads bird wouldn't ever make a pheasant kill in the wild. And if he ever catches one with his RT in falconry he should bask in his extremely good luck

Chase
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  #54  
Old Today, 10:27 AM
chase0109 chase0109 is offline
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Originally Posted by PheasantWhisperer View Post
How accurate are the hawks at catching the prey their after? Percentage wise.
That's a tough question. Are we talking wild or falconry? In the wild birds will expend as little energy as possible for the biggest reward. If your talking meadow voles for a RT, probably very high success rate per attempt. If were talking RT's on pheasants and jacks, very low due to the increased difficulty.

From a falconry standpoint. Falcons for example. When I flew ducks with a experienced bird he would usually make a kill if given a good setup on a reasonable pond. Pheasant success was very low with the same bird. The biggest difference was ducks would flush clean and pheasants wold just bail into cover and run off. Young falcons have a much harder time on the same duck setups. A young falcon is really like a puppy learning. You wouldn't expect a young dog to find point and hold every bird in a field. That comes with time and experience.

As for Dexter on jacks. Some days he is a superstar and goes 75% catches/flushes. Some days he can't seem to catch one to save his life, like 1 catch per 20 flushes. Really depends on the raptors experience, fitness level, quality of quarry and evasive manuevers. Plus the cover your flying.

We often say "if you want to fill your game bag use a shotgun, if you want the art of seeing the predator prey relationship use falconry". I love both methods! But falconry is more about getting a front row seat to what happens in nature than making lots of kills.

Thanks,

Chase
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  #55  
Old Today, 10:42 AM
chase0109 chase0109 is offline
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Originally Posted by fsentkilr View Post
That doesn't mean it isn't illegal, if a game warden see you shoot one on accident you get a ticket. If its not legal to shoot them it shouldn't be legal to hunt them and kill them any other way.
Hi fsentkilr,

I understand your thought process. I really do. But falconry is a non impact art and will not make any difference to the # of pheasants you see. We are allowed to legally kill hens via falconry. Kansas Reg:

(k) The statewide season for taking game birds by falconry shall be September 1 through March
31. Any falconer may possess hen pheasants that are incidentally taken by falconry means during the
established falconry game bird season. Each falconer shall possess no more than two hen pheasants per
day.

The key words here are "incidentally taken". The reason that reg was written is because we can't control what flushes and the bird don't care what the sex is. Now it says "incidentally". If would bet that its not legal to knowingly try to kill a hen. For example you see a lone hen under a tumbleweed and put a bird up with the intention of catching that specific hen. But get out in a crp field and you dog goes on point, you put a bird up. No idea what sex will flush. For falcons its usually one and done. We make a kill or not and that bird is done until tomorrow.

When we catch a hen it is by chance. Same as if you hit a hen with your car. I'm guessing you wouldn't get in trouble for that. I would say there are more hens killed by cars in kansas per day than falconers will kill in 10 years of hunting.

Chase
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  #56  
Old Today, 11:25 AM
Jerryv Jerryv is offline
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Interesting thread and very cool pictures. I'm guessing the cottontails are actually a little harder to hunt with a raptor because they tend to hang out in brush patches that would give them some protection. How much does Dexter weigh? Doesn't that get hard on your arm walking around carrying a large bird?

Jerry
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  #57  
Old Today, 11:40 AM
chase0109 chase0109 is offline
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Originally Posted by Jerryv View Post
Interesting thread and very cool pictures. I'm guessing the cottontails are actually a little harder to hunt with a raptor because they tend to hang out in brush patches that would give them some protection. How much does Dexter weigh? Doesn't that get hard on your arm walking around carrying a large bird?

Jerry
Hi Jerry,

Usually cottontails are hunted with birds on a perch above. Trees, telephone poles, hay stacks, ect. Red tails or harris hawks will follow the falconer (we act as the dog flushing game). They learn to follow us. Then they use skill and height to crash through the brush or thread the needle in small breaks in cover. A skilled bird can make it look easy. But overall it is very challenging and its up to the bird to use its skills to make the catch.

Dexter weights 6lb 12oz. It doesn't sound all that heavy, but putting that much weight on the top of your fist adds up. I'm pretty used to it and lift through out the year to stay in shape. But after walking for 3 hours in a field you feel it lol. Also jacks in KS average 6-7lb each. Add 3 of those to your vest and your ready to see the truck.

Thanks,

Chase
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