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Thread: CRP Haying Scenario - Right or Wrong?

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by haymaker View Post
    So as a landowner I book a hunt in December, guys show up with their German Shorthairs and the high for the day is -15 degrees and the wind is blowing 25 mph. They say we can't hunt in this and want some kind of compensation. Am I responsible for the weather? Likewise am I responsible to assure hunters that if a drought comes that they won't be affected? I have spent all the money on seed, chemical, planting plus tied up the land so I have made the investment should I be responsible for the weather and refund there money? Who is going to refund mine?
    I'm with you...

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    203

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    I agree about the weather but if someone books with you expecting 700 and get 350 that's a different story. When they booked the 700 was implied as huntible lands. The weather is not under someone's control. The grass getting cut is under someone's control. If I'm paying for something I want what I paid for, not half. If I choose not to hunt because the weather is crap, that's on me. In truth it really doesn't affect me because I don't pay anyone to hunt since I have plenty of relatives and friends as well as public land knowledge.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    230

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    If I booked a hotel room and the place burned down, I might want a refund.

    If I hired a stripper and.., well never mind about that.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    South Dakota
    Posts
    203

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    The hotel room is a good example. Say you book a room with two beds because there are enough people that you warrant having two beds. Then you arrive at the hotel to find only a single bed and the the hotel informs you that they knew you booked two beds but that now they only have single bed rooms. Would you not want a discount or an additional room? And to top it off they're going to charge you the same rate for the single as the double.

  5. #25

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    Quite frankly, i have seen lots of groups come and go...not with me personally, but I know plenty of farmers that do pay to hunt stuff for the first 3-4 weeks of the season. Most of these groups have about one dog per every 4 hunters, sometimes less. They aren't looking to walk 8-12+ miles per day in switchgrass, cattails, etc. They usually have food plots set up for them. If half the grass was cut, from 750 acres to 375 acres, it would help their hunting...concentrate the birds more. If this outfit caters to more serious hunters who have a dog or two per hunter, then the landowner better call them. It is quite likely that he could strip some corn and leave it for a month longer than he had planned, and create some really good hunting for groups that may not have as much dog power and who don't want to hunt all day. I have no idea what kind of hunters he caters to. My guess is that each group probably has at least one guy that is somewhat of a pheasant nerd, who reads about what is going on, talks to farmers, etc. The word will get out to them when the brood count survey comes out...my newspaper in duluth mn has a blurb every year right after that comes out...if the guys ended up out there without knowing, and they had to do some scouting in the am and find some spots to supplement what they already have, I would guess it would add a dimension to their hunt...yes, they may indeed be justified in being a bit mad...whatever. new scenario, please!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    230

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    Good points.

    The number of birds probably won't be reduced much, but would be concentrated.

    But adjustments should be made, the farmer made a decision based on his best interest.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    478

    Default David0311

    Quote Originally Posted by McFarmer View Post
    Frequently here folks talk about pitching in and helping the farmer out, has anyone actually done that ? I mean, it's a good intention and all, but as a farmer I can't think of anything I would allow someone to walk onto the place and do.

    Maybe mow the lawn.
    Yes--

    Over the years I have--

    Run the grain cart-- and loaded the semi's-with up to three but usually two combines working the fields
    Helped repair fences
    Moved cattle from summer pastures to home place-over some long distances
    Helped with vaccination of new cattle
    Hauled bales
    And ran for parts from the farm to wherever parts were available
    Among any thing else I could do to help out
    Put in some long hours and days when help was needed--gladly

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    230

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    Good deal, I've never seen that sort of thing in this area.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    UGUIDE South Dakota Pheasant Hunting
    Posts
    3,942

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    Just drove thru eastern SD and to the farm. I noticed the CREP was hayed for the most part. What this means is the 85,000 acres of CREP open to public hunting is being hayed at 50% resulting in what will be 42,500 acres roughly. This is certainly "right" because within the contractual bounds of CREP.

    May make some hunting easier but some folks will surely be shocked and the reduction in cover.

    Another way to look at this is say SD has 1 million acres of CRP. Now only 500,000 is huntable from emergency haying. Hmmm. Interesting.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    20 miles south of Ft. Worth, Tx
    Posts
    177

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    Quote Originally Posted by david0311 View Post
    Yes--

    Over the years I have--

    Run the grain cart-- and loaded the semi's-with up to three but usually two combines working the fields
    Helped repair fences
    Moved cattle from summer pastures to home place-over some long distances
    Helped with vaccination of new cattle
    Hauled bales
    And ran for parts from the farm to wherever parts were available
    Among any thing else I could do to help out
    Put in some long hours and days when help was needed--gladly
    Pretty much exactly the same experience with my group. We have done all those things...and hosted dinners as well. It's just the right thing to do. IMO.

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