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Thread: Drought

  1. #1

    Default Drought

    http://www.kfyrtv.com/content/news/H...433014203.html

    BOWMAN, N.D. - Farmers and ranchers in the southwestern part of the state are feeling the effects of the drought perhaps more than others. Andrew Horn tells us how the federal government and Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., are trying to help.


    The dry crunching of your crop is never a sound a farmer wants to hear.

    Wendy Bartholomay with the USDA office in Bowman walked around area farms describing what the drought has done to Bowman and Slope County land the past two years.

    "What we have here is the remnants of a fire that ignited while haying the area," said Bartholomay.

    The state's drought has killed or stunted the vast majority of crops in the southwestern part of the state. When Senator Heidi Heitkamp came to town, farmers and ranchers packed the Bowman Livestock Auction to hear how the government plans to help those most affected.

    "The concern I have is that they are going to sit on their hind hands for two weeks thinking it doesn't matter when those two weeks can be critical to a rancher," sadi Heitkamp.

  2. #2
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    Jun 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRITTMAN View Post
    http://www.kfyrtv.com/content/news/H...433014203.html

    BOWMAN, N.D. - Farmers and ranchers in the southwestern part of the state are feeling the effects of the drought perhaps more than others. Andrew Horn tells us how the federal government and Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., are trying to help.


    The dry crunching of your crop is never a sound a farmer wants to hear.

    Wendy Bartholomay with the USDA office in Bowman walked around area farms describing what the drought has done to Bowman and Slope County land the past two years.

    "What we have here is the remnants of a fire that ignited while haying the area," said Bartholomay.

    The state's drought has killed or stunted the vast majority of crops in the southwestern part of the state. When Senator Heidi Heitkamp came to town, farmers and ranchers packed the Bowman Livestock Auction to hear how the government plans to help those most affected.

    "The concern I have is that they are going to sit on their hind hands for two weeks thinking it doesn't matter when those two weeks can be critical to a rancher," sadi Heitkamp.
    supposed to be in the high 90's this week.......feel bad for you guys, loss of CRP and now drought.....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Minnesota
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    Did I see rain in the southwestern part of the state yesterday! Anybody know how much made it to the ground?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    NoDak
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    Hey all, don't know how much they got, but I don't think much and I doubt if it really helped much. What we need is that soaking kind of rain, not a 5 min downpour. But none really in sight. Sunday morning, we got a heck of a thunderstorm, thunder, lightening, but not one drop of rain! Really odd.

    100's are expected by the end of this week and into the 90's next. As far as our crops go, there done. I doubt if they would make a rebound even with lots of rain. Folks around here can't remember a year this bad in recent memory.

    On another note. The Bismarck Tribune came out that the USDA has now authorized haying of CRP. Some farmers will take advantage of this, but, a lot of the CRP is not good for feed or anything other than bedding. Guess time will tell on this deal.

    Best,

    Greg

    P.S. Some info from G&F

    http://www.kfyrtv.com/content/news/D...432739983.html
    Last edited by gjw; 07-11-2017 at 11:52 AM.
    Gregory J. Westberg
    MSG, USA
    Ret

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    241

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    The feedlots can grind the CRP hay and make pretty decent feed out of it. That and corn silage ( if they get any) can keep a cow very well.

    I'm a retired cattle producer and I have been in that situation once in my life. I'm telling you few things are as stressful as having hungry mouths to feed and the prospect of nothing being there.

    I know folks don't like to see the CRP ground harvested, but it is a reserve, and now they need that reserve. It will be better nesting habitat next year for it.

  6. #6
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    Thanks McFarmer on that CRP info, really didn't know that. Good fact too know. I know a lot of the ranchers around here don't use feedlots, but heck if they can grind CRP why not. Most the folks down here are ranchers and I know where they are coming from, lots of talk after Church on this drought and what they think is going to happen, not many are optimistic. If I was a rancher, I'd be haying also. I'd try and save as much as my herd as possible and try and keep my head above water. They've suffered plenty in this drought, I only pray for rain.

    Thanks again!

    Greg
    Gregory J. Westberg
    MSG, USA
    Ret

  7. #7
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    Jun 2012
    Location
    Stillwater MN
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    I hate to make this about pheasants but does anyone think it's time to change our plans? This was to be our first trip out to Hettinger. North Dakota for that matter.

    Thanks

  8. #8
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    Apr 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Byrdoglvr View Post
    I hate to make this about pheasants but does anyone think it's time to change our plans? This was to be our first trip out to Hettinger. North Dakota for that matter.

    Thanks

    Hi, well to be honest, I think it might be too early to tell. The birds are down, no doubt about that, but with this drought and loss of CRP it may be a tough year. The brood counts will be out in mid to late August and they are a good indicator on how the season will go. There will be pockets of good populations, but finding them this year might be difficult. This year is a wait and see one. The area where you plan on going is the pheasant belt for this state, so your chances will be better than other regions. Sorry that there is no real yes or no answer to your question.

    Best,

    Greg
    Gregory J. Westberg
    MSG, USA
    Ret

  9. #9

    Default

    Brood count data might be misleading - one way or the other.

    Pheasants will be much more visible because of the lack of cover.

    Pheasants will not be on the roads as much if the grass is not tall and WET.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Byrdoglvr View Post
    I hate to make this about pheasants but does anyone think it's time to change our plans? This was to be our first trip out to Hettinger. North Dakota for that matter.

    Thanks
    no I don't think you need to go that far yet they got some rain yesterday and if they keep getting some it will save the season I think (or I hope ) there should still be some good pockets of birds around.

    any one know what the corn looks like over there by bowman ?

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