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Thread: Hunting between Hettinger and Lemmon

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    400

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    That map is informative but makes me worry. Are the crops looking like a disaster?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    NoDak
    Posts
    205

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    Quote Originally Posted by esetter View Post
    That map is informative but makes me worry. Are the crops looking like a disaster?
    Hi all, well, down be me they are in poor shape. The corn I've seen is not even shin high, like the old saying it should be "knee high by the 4th". The wheat is also stunted. The hay crop is bad, they did get a short cutting, but I think that's about all they may get this year. Doesn't look good unless we start getting rain. Not much of that in the forecast either.

    The USDA has opened CRP to grazing, just a matter of time until it's open for haying.

    Who knows what the season will be like, but it seems that a lot of cover will be gone.

    Please pray for rain for us!

    Best,

    Greg
    Gregory J. Westberg
    MSG, USA
    Ret

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    400

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    Looks like its gonna be one of those years where you push cattails all day long around water. I hate that fuzzy stuff that comes off of it and chokes you!!

  4. #14

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    If substantial rain does not come soon, the cattail sloughs will be dry or there will be large mudflats between cattails and water.

    A large number of cattail sloughs will be cut or just as likely burned. It actually has benefits in regenerating the sloughs, but dramatically reduces small cover available for birds to hide and hunters to hunt.

    Some dry falls in North Dakota have the stark visual reality of dead-grass yellow land and smokey gray skies.

    Those with some CRP acres will definitely see the benefit this year with some grass to sell and a small financial safety net of CRP payments.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Great lake state
    Posts
    87

    Default

    Heck they been burning them for 10 years.

  6. #16

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    Burning sloughs ... more like 50 years or more.

    Real dry years the sky will be filled with smoke from all the burning sloughs. Little tougher to burn them when they are wet.

    Many sloughs were actually farmed 1982-1992. When the rains returned low spots flooded and the cattails returned.

    Sloughs and ponds that survived the drought over the same time period became sustainable fisheries.

    Long time ago now we hunted a Federal WPA that had a large slough bottom that was planted and farmed. The entire WPA is now underwater and the lake that formed supports fish.

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