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Thread: Will public be any good in SD this year?

  1. #71
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    Feb 2011
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    South Dakota
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    Quote Originally Posted by FCSpringer View Post
    Yes there may be a cost for opperating. But chris come on bud. Farmers are not hurting. 8$ a bushel corn. We all know what kinda doe farms are pulling down the last years. I my self at least have a clue, since my family farms. But folks have to look at it as well, if you go pay and support the gouging, your gonna keep paying it. Best way to stop it is dont go. Dont pay, and hit publics etc. Or just go elsewhere close to home and support a local preserve. Now if a person goes all the way out there and forks out all that doe, you really have no right to bitch about it either. Many well off folks love it. So if your not happy, try looking else where, or go about it different.

    My costs here
    Lic? 26.50$
    Gas, emm maybe a hundred bucks for all season.
    emm 30 bucks for shells
    Took about 40 roosters last time I counted.
    So thats about 3.91$ per bird. All private land asking for the day, public, and walking from home. Never ever, will I pay to enjoy the great old USofA's bountiful God given wild life. Well, shouldnt say that cause I spend about 3-4 dollars a bird. Before I would shell out that doe. I would just go buy 9 roosters at 10 bucks and release them on a public and go find a few. I'm cheap LOL I like to keep the money I made.
    Springer
    You talk about the best way to stop it. If it stops then most of my food plots have to turn into soybean fields and my CRP turns into corn fields. Then the hunters that are here have to go someplace else and put more pressure on the places that are left. I think that the market is doing it's job and finding a place that works for most of the hunters. If you prefer to support a local preserve rather than habitat that benefits many types of wildlife, then do so. But the wild bird pheasant industry also benefits ducks and geese and deer and rabbits and mice and owls and coyotes and hawks etc. What is so bad about that?

  2. #72
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    Dec 2006
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    MN-MT
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    Anybody that has a good dog and is willing to work at it, spend all day should have no trouble getting a three rooster limit on public land in ND or SD.
    Don't understand why people pay hundreds of dollars a day to shoot 3 birds in a half hour.

  3. #73
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    Oct 2011
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    Waverly, Al
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    I have seen this same issue here in the south with deer hunting. When I was a kid you could get access to land for free or for a very nominal fee. My dad use to lease several thousand acres for a whole year for $1.00 per acre. Now it is over $10.00 per acre. What caused this? It is simply economics 101. Demand for the hunting rights went up and prices followed. Do I like it? No. Do I still lease property? Yes. If I want my son to have the same hunting experiences that I did, I have no other choice. Well, that is not exactly true. I could just buy property and pay the mortgage, taxes, insurance, etc. but I choose to lease.

    Having come to South Dakota for many years now, I see a similar situation. I choose to hunt public ground, but have no issues with those that choose to pay, nor do I have an issue with property owners charging for access. It is their property, they pay the mortgage, taxes, insurance, etc. If they make a profit farming or by charging access fees, well that is the Amercan way. If you don't want to pay the fees to hunt someone else's property, then don't. Hunt public property or better yet, buy you a section of land and then you can charge access fees.

    I would love to go back to the days when you could simply ask and get permission to hunt for free, but those days are gone. Let's enjoy what we have while we have it because if this country continues down the path it's going, it's all going to be gone soon.

  4. #74
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    Jan 2011
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    basehor, ks
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    Quote Originally Posted by haymaker View Post
    Springer
    You talk about the best way to stop it. If it stops then most of my food plots have to turn into soybean fields and my CRP turns into corn fields. Then the hunters that are here have to go someplace else and put more pressure on the places that are left. I think that the market is doing it's job and finding a place that works for most of the hunters. If you prefer to support a local preserve rather than habitat that benefits many types of wildlife, then do so. But the wild bird pheasant industry also benefits ducks and geese and deer and rabbits and mice and owls and coyotes and hawks etc. What is so bad about that?
    Haymaker,

    You will never convince these guys that have a problem with what you and others do. They would have you plant half your land in CRP, and the other half in milo that you only harvested half of. Then allow unlimited free acess to anyone that came by. It is your land. Do with it what you will. I really could care less if farmers drive a 50k truck, and ride in a 1m dollar combine. So they make enough farming so the hunting should be free? I appreciate the fact that what you leave helps the birds everywhere around your farm. I would far prefer that over the guy that farms ditch to ditch with no regard for wildlife.

  5. #75
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    Oct 2006
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    UGUIDE South Dakota Pheasant Hunting
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnmthunting View Post
    Anybody that has a good dog and is willing to work at it, spend all day should have no trouble getting a three rooster limit on public land in ND or SD.
    Don't understand why people pay hundreds of dollars a day to shoot 3 birds in a half hour.
    Come on Wayne. You are experiencing what I enjoyed hunting solo in Iowa. South Dakota is a whole different game. You have underestimated the surreal value of Pheasant Camp. Shooting 3 birds a day is not the only activity at Pheasant Camp.

    I admire your style though as you go where others are not will to go and by principle have reserved yourself a nice little honey hole as long as others are not willing to go the distance.

  6. #76
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    South Dakota
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    Quote Originally Posted by carptom1 View Post
    Haymaker,

    You will never convince these guys that have a problem with what you and others do. They would have you plant half your land in CRP, and the other half in milo that you only harvested half of. Then allow unlimited free acess to anyone that came by. It is your land. Do with it what you will. I really could care less if farmers drive a 50k truck, and ride in a 1m dollar combine. So they make enough farming so the hunting should be free? I appreciate the fact that what you leave helps the birds everywhere around your farm. I would far prefer that over the guy that farms ditch to ditch with no regard for wildlife.
    Thank you. I don't need to convince anyone, I do hope that I give them something to think about. It is a bigger picture type thing than how much do I pay for the pheasants I shoot. I believe U Guide calls it a partnership of some kind where the sportsman contributes directly to the creation of habitat. That habitat does good for many species and the soil and the water and the air.

  7. #77
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    Oct 2006
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    UGUIDE South Dakota Pheasant Hunting
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    Quote Originally Posted by carptom1 View Post
    Haymaker,

    You will never convince these guys that have a problem with what you and others do. They would have you plant half your land in CRP, and the other half in milo that you only harvested half of. Then allow unlimited free acess to anyone that came by. It is your land. Do with it what you will. I really could care less if farmers drive a 50k truck, and ride in a 1m dollar combine. So they make enough farming so the hunting should be free? I appreciate the fact that what you leave helps the birds everywhere around your farm. I would far prefer that over the guy that farms ditch to ditch with no regard for wildlife.
    Well said CT1,

    I had a very hard time seeing things from the landowners position before I owned land. Some can do this and are gifted in my opinion but my perspective changed 100% when on the owners side. A revelation if you will.

    As a side note CRP's bright shing moment in South Dakota, from a farmers perspective, is that hay prices are sky high and they could hay 50% of their CRP. I bet the ones that converted it and got no crop were maybe they had left it in CRP. The ones that had it maybe were glad they did?

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ramsey, MN
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    7

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    We should notify those "Occupy" protesters of the problems in SD with the way the 1% is sticking it to us poor hunters....

    We have never been asked for anything from the rancher who lets us hunt, but we love going to SD and having incredible access to birds so much that we always leave a good chunk of cash with him when we leave. I would also bet that over the last few years when the bird numbers have been ridiculously good, we have spent far less time actually hunting than we did helping out around the farm. Us city boys have just as much fun playing on the farm as we do shooting birds.

    If you look at it on a cost per bird basis, you will make yourself sick. It's all about the experience and the time with family and friends. Some of my best memories of my Grandfather are of pheasant hunting in South Dakota. From that perspective our trips were worth every penny and we will continue to pay, help out, and do anything else required to keep the tradition going.

  9. #79
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    Jun 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by haymaker View Post
    Thank you. I don't need to convince anyone, I do hope that I give them something to think about. It is a bigger picture type thing than how much do I pay for the pheasants I shoot. I believe U Guide calls it a partnership of some kind where the sportsman contributes directly to the creation of habitat. That habitat does good for many species and the soil and the water and the air.
    and i think everyone clearly understands the concept, as do the father and his 2 sons, who can't afford $450 per day for tresspass fees.....clearly the sport has become more for the "haves", than the "have nots"....but leftovers are always available.

  10. #80
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    Oct 2010
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    New Prague, MN
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    I still dont get how people think you have to pay tress pass fees. SD has plenty of public to shoot birds on. If SD is getting to be to much money head to ND. If its not posted and there is no fence its public.

    Shooting a limit of birds is not what pheasant hunting or hunting is really all about. All im trying to say is the people that pay the money and can afford it are helping keep CRP alive when corn is $8. Find land around that area hunt some ditches and min maintenance roads.

    As for what this thread was started about. Im sure there is still going to be plenty of birds and SD will harvest 3x times the amount of birds than any other state combined. It cant be any worse than last year witch is still better than any other state by far. The only real way to know is to go hunt.

    I know if I was not having a kid Oct 26th ( ya bad timing on my part ) I would be in SD for 2 weeks this year.

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